Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoloney, Jerome V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXie, Yong
dc.creatorXie, Yongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:43:19Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:43:19Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195217
dc.description.abstractWith the manufacture of nano-scale features in the last ten years, it is possible to do optical experiments on features as small as a tenth/hundredth wavelength. It turns out that the experimental data cannot be explained by classical diffraction theories. Thus, it is necessary to develop new methods or use existing approaches which are effective in other fields, to solve problems in photonics. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD), to study transmission properties of sub-wavelength slits in a metallic film. By doing simulations on periodic and single slits, we confirm that the TE mode has a cutoff while a TM mode always has a propagating mode in the small apertures. Then we find that the transmittance is minimum when the array period is equal to the wavelength of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) at normal incidence. In fact, the SPP-like waves exist in both periodic and isolated slits, and they help the transmittance of small apertures. In order to establish the role of SPP in the transmission mechanism, it is necessary to single out each mode from the total fields. We developed Bloch mode method (BMM) to calculate the amplitudes of the lowest N orders, and the amplitudes tell us which one is dominant (not including the guided mode) at high and low transmission. BMM converges very fast and it is more accurate than FDTD since it does not suffer from numerical dispersion. Both methods can resolve the Wood anomaly and SPP anomaly; however, FDTD converges very slowly at the SPP resonance and oscillates around the value obtained through BMM at the Wood anomaly. BMM is not sensitive to material types, incident angles, and anomalies; it will be a useful tool to investigate similar problems.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectsurface plasmon polaritonen_US
dc.subjectbloch mode methoden_US
dc.subjectwood anomalyen_US
dc.subjectsub-wavelength apertureen_US
dc.subjectgratingen_US
dc.titleTransmission Properties of Sub-Wavelength Metallic Slits and Their Applicationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairMoloney, Jerome V.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746429en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMansuripur, Masuden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Ewam M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1872en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T22:49:29Z
html.description.abstractWith the manufacture of nano-scale features in the last ten years, it is possible to do optical experiments on features as small as a tenth/hundredth wavelength. It turns out that the experimental data cannot be explained by classical diffraction theories. Thus, it is necessary to develop new methods or use existing approaches which are effective in other fields, to solve problems in photonics. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD), to study transmission properties of sub-wavelength slits in a metallic film. By doing simulations on periodic and single slits, we confirm that the TE mode has a cutoff while a TM mode always has a propagating mode in the small apertures. Then we find that the transmittance is minimum when the array period is equal to the wavelength of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) at normal incidence. In fact, the SPP-like waves exist in both periodic and isolated slits, and they help the transmittance of small apertures. In order to establish the role of SPP in the transmission mechanism, it is necessary to single out each mode from the total fields. We developed Bloch mode method (BMM) to calculate the amplitudes of the lowest N orders, and the amplitudes tell us which one is dominant (not including the guided mode) at high and low transmission. BMM converges very fast and it is more accurate than FDTD since it does not suffer from numerical dispersion. Both methods can resolve the Wood anomaly and SPP anomaly; however, FDTD converges very slowly at the SPP resonance and oscillates around the value obtained through BMM at the Wood anomaly. BMM is not sensitive to material types, incident angles, and anomalies; it will be a useful tool to investigate similar problems.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_1872_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
5.774Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_etd_1872_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record