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dc.contributor.advisorMaldonado-Maldonaod, G. Almaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCantwell, Brendan
dc.creatorCantwell, Brendanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:49:59Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:49:59Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195383
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a qualitative investigation into international postdoctoral employment in life science and engineering fields at universities in the United States and United Kingdom. Data were gathered through 49 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with international postdocs, faculty members who have supervised international postdocs from abroad at two universities in the US and two universities in the UK. The number of postdoctoral appointments has increased dramatically over the past decade, as has the share of these appointees who come from aboard. Yet few studies have investigated what is underlying this growing trend. By examining interactions between structure and agency at local, global and national levels, this study explored the roles that international postdocs play in academic production and the process by which they become mobile. Theory on globalization, higher education policy and models of academic production guide this study. Findings show that international postdocs are becoming scientific employees, rather than trainees, who are incorporated into capitalist modes of academic production as low-cost, high-yield scientific workers. Universities and individual faculty members seek international postdocs because of their contributions to research production; however, few postdocs have the opportunity to move into tenure-tracked faculty jobs. For international postdocs, becoming mobile is an individual process that is often constructed by individuals who negotiate home country academic policies in a global academic market. Mobility is a multi-stage process that begins with the potential to become mobile and is realized by actual mobility, which occurs through a transnational space produced by international journals that define global science.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectacademic capitalismen_US
dc.subjectacademic productionen_US
dc.subjecthigher education internationalizationen_US
dc.subjectinternational postdocsen_US
dc.subjectmigrationen_US
dc.titleInternational Postdocs: Educational Migration and Academic Production in a Global Marketen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairMaldonado-Maldonaod, G. Almaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750940en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaldonado-Maldonaod, G. Almaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLee, Jenny J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10315en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-03T20:12:49Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation is a qualitative investigation into international postdoctoral employment in life science and engineering fields at universities in the United States and United Kingdom. Data were gathered through 49 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with international postdocs, faculty members who have supervised international postdocs from abroad at two universities in the US and two universities in the UK. The number of postdoctoral appointments has increased dramatically over the past decade, as has the share of these appointees who come from aboard. Yet few studies have investigated what is underlying this growing trend. By examining interactions between structure and agency at local, global and national levels, this study explored the roles that international postdocs play in academic production and the process by which they become mobile. Theory on globalization, higher education policy and models of academic production guide this study. Findings show that international postdocs are becoming scientific employees, rather than trainees, who are incorporated into capitalist modes of academic production as low-cost, high-yield scientific workers. Universities and individual faculty members seek international postdocs because of their contributions to research production; however, few postdocs have the opportunity to move into tenure-tracked faculty jobs. For international postdocs, becoming mobile is an individual process that is often constructed by individuals who negotiate home country academic policies in a global academic market. Mobility is a multi-stage process that begins with the potential to become mobile and is realized by actual mobility, which occurs through a transnational space produced by international journals that define global science.


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