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dc.contributor.authorCooper, Roger Willson
dc.creatorCooper, Roger Willsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T13:57:08Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T13:57:08Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195547
dc.description.abstractThis study illuminates the perceptions of dental school administrators and faculty of a new, non-traditional dental school and the extent to which these perceptions influence the processes of dental education within their school as well as their perceptions of crises in dental education.Using an instrumental case study approach, an intrinsic case study examines perceptions that developed a non-traditional dental school. The case study is then instrumental in examination of the influences of the new economy and networks within the theory of academic capitalism that influence the formation and operation of this new school as well as influences on perceptions of crises in dental education as defined by organized dentistry.All characteristics of the new economy (globalization, knowledge as raw material, non-Fordist manufacturing, educated/tech savvy workers) are perceived as profoundly influencing the processes of dental education at the new school. Of four networks within the theory of academic capitalism (new circuits of knowledge, interstitial organization emergence, intermediating networks, extended managerial capacity) only new circuits of knowledge are perceived to have profound influence on the formation and operation of the school.The perceptions of characteristics of the new economy and networks of the theory of academic capitalism have established a dental school decidedly distinctive in the approach to dental education with the crises in dental education perceived as real and influencing this distinct approach taken by this school in providing dental education.Salient characteristics of the new economy and networks within the theory of academic capitalism, when operationally defined, serve as powerful tools as explanatory vehicles to define the extent of their influence on the foundations and operations of this dental education institution and the extent to which these foundations and operations may influence the crises in dental education.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.titleCrises in Dental Education: An Instrumental Case Study Examinationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747180en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaldonado-Maldonado, Almaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2073en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-16T06:50:17Z
html.description.abstractThis study illuminates the perceptions of dental school administrators and faculty of a new, non-traditional dental school and the extent to which these perceptions influence the processes of dental education within their school as well as their perceptions of crises in dental education.Using an instrumental case study approach, an intrinsic case study examines perceptions that developed a non-traditional dental school. The case study is then instrumental in examination of the influences of the new economy and networks within the theory of academic capitalism that influence the formation and operation of this new school as well as influences on perceptions of crises in dental education as defined by organized dentistry.All characteristics of the new economy (globalization, knowledge as raw material, non-Fordist manufacturing, educated/tech savvy workers) are perceived as profoundly influencing the processes of dental education at the new school. Of four networks within the theory of academic capitalism (new circuits of knowledge, interstitial organization emergence, intermediating networks, extended managerial capacity) only new circuits of knowledge are perceived to have profound influence on the formation and operation of the school.The perceptions of characteristics of the new economy and networks of the theory of academic capitalism have established a dental school decidedly distinctive in the approach to dental education with the crises in dental education perceived as real and influencing this distinct approach taken by this school in providing dental education.Salient characteristics of the new economy and networks within the theory of academic capitalism, when operationally defined, serve as powerful tools as explanatory vehicles to define the extent of their influence on the foundations and operations of this dental education institution and the extent to which these foundations and operations may influence the crises in dental education.


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