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dc.contributor.advisorKost, Alan R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdi, Abdeq M*
dc.creatorAbdi, Abdeq Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T14:04:25Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T14:04:25Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195714
dc.description.abstractIn this work, concepts of smart structures, health monitoring systems, and Infrastructure Optics are discussed. This accumulates in the development of the Optical and Structural Simulation software that integrates all key components of Infrastructure Optics. Recent developments in the use of Coherent Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (C-OFDR) to interrogate Fiber Bragg Grating Arrays (FBGA) have shown promise in its use in infrastructure health monitoring systems. In this work, the modeling, design, simulation, fabrication, calibration, and testing of a three-element, 15.3 cm fiber Bragg grating strain sensor array with C-OFDR interrogation technique are demonstrated. The FBGA/C-OFDR was initially simulated using in-house software that incorporates transfer matrices. Compared to the previous techniques used, the transfer matrix method allows a system wide approach to modeling the FBGA/C-OFDR system.In the second half of this work, a cavity interference suppression method is used to suppress interferences between fiber Bragg gratings. The cavity interference suppression method is simulated using two transfer matrices, after which, a practical design using a circular polarized source and polarization devices is proposed. Compared to previous techniques, the cavity interference suppression method does not require down shifting the cavity interferences to a lower frequency band, potentially saving fiber material and bandwidth.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleStructural Monitoring With Fiber Bragg Grating Strain Sensor Array and Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometryen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairKost, Alan R.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355449en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKost, Alan R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHonkanen, Seppoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKueppers, Frankoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1399en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-29T15:34:12Z
html.description.abstractIn this work, concepts of smart structures, health monitoring systems, and Infrastructure Optics are discussed. This accumulates in the development of the Optical and Structural Simulation software that integrates all key components of Infrastructure Optics. Recent developments in the use of Coherent Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (C-OFDR) to interrogate Fiber Bragg Grating Arrays (FBGA) have shown promise in its use in infrastructure health monitoring systems. In this work, the modeling, design, simulation, fabrication, calibration, and testing of a three-element, 15.3 cm fiber Bragg grating strain sensor array with C-OFDR interrogation technique are demonstrated. The FBGA/C-OFDR was initially simulated using in-house software that incorporates transfer matrices. Compared to the previous techniques used, the transfer matrix method allows a system wide approach to modeling the FBGA/C-OFDR system.In the second half of this work, a cavity interference suppression method is used to suppress interferences between fiber Bragg gratings. The cavity interference suppression method is simulated using two transfer matrices, after which, a practical design using a circular polarized source and polarization devices is proposed. Compared to previous techniques, the cavity interference suppression method does not require down shifting the cavity interferences to a lower frequency band, potentially saving fiber material and bandwidth.


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