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dc.contributor.advisorOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGevrek, Zahide Eylem*
dc.creatorGevrek, Zahide Eylemen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T14:10:53Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T14:10:53Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195868
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of three essays that focuses on the role of family structure in shaping the economic integration of immigrants. The first essay analyzes the interaction between the labor market and the marriage market for immigrants. I examine the relationship between interethnic marriage and the labor market integration of immigrants. The main findings of this study indicate that intermarriage has a positive effect on immigrants' labor market outcomes. Intermarried immigrants earn more than their co-ethnic married counterparts. Marrying a native is associated with a wage premium of seven percent. Moreover, intermarriage premium varies across generations. Second-generation immigrants are found to receive no gain from intermarriage. The second essay investigates whether there is a significant difference in the educational attainment of second-generation immigrants associated with the presence of a native-born parent. It is important to study educational attainment of children of immigrants as human capital investment is a crucial factor for labor market success. The second essay provides evidence that children with a native-born parent have higher educational attainment than those with two immigrant parents. The third essay empirically examines the impact of culture on the work behavior of second-generation immigrant women. Using female labor force participation and total fertility rates in the country of ancestry as cultural proxies, I find that culture matters for the female labor supply. In line with the sociological literature that considers intermarriage as a sign of inclination toward cultural assimilation, I also find that the impact of cultural proxies is significantly larger for women with immigrant parents than for those with intermarried parents.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThe Role of Family Structure in Immigrants' Economic Integrationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752260971en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFishback, Price V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGelbach, Jonah B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest11088en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-25T11:42:38Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of three essays that focuses on the role of family structure in shaping the economic integration of immigrants. The first essay analyzes the interaction between the labor market and the marriage market for immigrants. I examine the relationship between interethnic marriage and the labor market integration of immigrants. The main findings of this study indicate that intermarriage has a positive effect on immigrants' labor market outcomes. Intermarried immigrants earn more than their co-ethnic married counterparts. Marrying a native is associated with a wage premium of seven percent. Moreover, intermarriage premium varies across generations. Second-generation immigrants are found to receive no gain from intermarriage. The second essay investigates whether there is a significant difference in the educational attainment of second-generation immigrants associated with the presence of a native-born parent. It is important to study educational attainment of children of immigrants as human capital investment is a crucial factor for labor market success. The second essay provides evidence that children with a native-born parent have higher educational attainment than those with two immigrant parents. The third essay empirically examines the impact of culture on the work behavior of second-generation immigrant women. Using female labor force participation and total fertility rates in the country of ancestry as cultural proxies, I find that culture matters for the female labor supply. In line with the sociological literature that considers intermarriage as a sign of inclination toward cultural assimilation, I also find that the impact of cultural proxies is significantly larger for women with immigrant parents than for those with intermarried parents.


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