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dc.contributor.advisorUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorArmendariz, Fernando R.
dc.creatorArmendariz, Fernando R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T14:14:55Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T14:14:55Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195948
dc.description.abstractThis study looked at whether a procedure of interspersing individual targeted questions would improve participation by low-responding students during a choral responding activity. Improved participation involved increased responding, increased accuracy, and decreased disruptive behavior. The study was conducted in two established elementary school classrooms. In each class, data were collected on two low-responding and two high-responding students. The choral activity was conducted in each classroom for 10 minutes a day. An ABAB reversal design was used. During baseline conditions, teachers conducted whole-group choral responding only. During the intervention conditions, teachers interspersed targeted questions to individuals who responded at low levels during the whole group choral responding activity. During the intervention (targeted questioning) conditions, the low-participating students in each classroom (a) responded to a higher percentage of the teacher's questions, (b) maintained or increased response accuracy, and (c) decreased disruptive behavior. During these same conditions, the high participating students maintained or slightly increased their participation levels. Teachers gave high social validity ratings to the targeted questioning procedure, noting that it made choral responding more effective with unwilling responders.
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBehavior Analysisen_US
dc.subjectEffective Instructionen_US
dc.subjectChoral Respondingen_US
dc.subjectDisruptive Behavioren_US
dc.subjectActive Student Respondingen_US
dc.subjecten_US
dc.titleImproving Participation During Choral Respondingen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355338en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLiaupsin, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1375en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education & Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T17:58:38Z
html.description.abstractThis study looked at whether a procedure of interspersing individual targeted questions would improve participation by low-responding students during a choral responding activity. Improved participation involved increased responding, increased accuracy, and decreased disruptive behavior. The study was conducted in two established elementary school classrooms. In each class, data were collected on two low-responding and two high-responding students. The choral activity was conducted in each classroom for 10 minutes a day. An ABAB reversal design was used. During baseline conditions, teachers conducted whole-group choral responding only. During the intervention conditions, teachers interspersed targeted questions to individuals who responded at low levels during the whole group choral responding activity. During the intervention (targeted questioning) conditions, the low-participating students in each classroom (a) responded to a higher percentage of the teacher's questions, (b) maintained or increased response accuracy, and (c) decreased disruptive behavior. During these same conditions, the high participating students maintained or slightly increased their participation levels. Teachers gave high social validity ratings to the targeted questioning procedure, noting that it made choral responding more effective with unwilling responders.


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