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dc.contributor.advisorMichaels, Cathleen L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, Kathleen Nevin
dc.creatorHall, Kathleen Nevinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T14:15:38Z
dc.date.available2011-12-06T14:15:38Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/195965
dc.description.abstractPhysical activity (PA) is beneficial for older women, yet, many older women are physically inactive. One way to motivate older women to become physically active is through physically active identity development. This study tested an intervention to see if physically active identity development could be facilitated, and if a facilitated physically active identity resulted in increased PA. A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used with a convenience sample of 43 older women. Data analyses compared those who completed the study versus those who did not complete the study and those assigned to the intervention versus the attention-control group. Those who did not complete the study (N=22) had significantly higher walking frequency (p=.023) and significantly lower duration of sitting (p=.000). Among those who participated in the intervention (N=12) or attention-control (N=9) activities, there were no significant differences in physically active identities or PA at the end of the nine-week study period. Therefore, the study's two hypotheses were not supported. Significant associations were noted between physically active identity measures and health status (p=.039), ego-resiliency (p=.040, p=.016), general fear of performing PA (p=.024), and access to PA (p=.017). Limitations of the study include the high risk of error in the statistical conclusions due to low statistical power, the limitations of the sample, limitations of the intervention itself, and the failure to track subjects longitudinally. Implications for nursing education, practice, and research are discussed. Recommendations for future studies were suggested.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectolder womenen_US
dc.subjectphysical activityen_US
dc.titleFacilitating Physically Active Identity Development in Older Womenen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.contributor.chairMichaels, Cathleen L.en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor-Piliae, Ruthen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11358en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-25T12:42:08Z
html.description.abstractPhysical activity (PA) is beneficial for older women, yet, many older women are physically inactive. One way to motivate older women to become physically active is through physically active identity development. This study tested an intervention to see if physically active identity development could be facilitated, and if a facilitated physically active identity resulted in increased PA. A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was used with a convenience sample of 43 older women. Data analyses compared those who completed the study versus those who did not complete the study and those assigned to the intervention versus the attention-control group. Those who did not complete the study (N=22) had significantly higher walking frequency (p=.023) and significantly lower duration of sitting (p=.000). Among those who participated in the intervention (N=12) or attention-control (N=9) activities, there were no significant differences in physically active identities or PA at the end of the nine-week study period. Therefore, the study's two hypotheses were not supported. Significant associations were noted between physically active identity measures and health status (p=.039), ego-resiliency (p=.040, p=.016), general fear of performing PA (p=.024), and access to PA (p=.017). Limitations of the study include the high risk of error in the statistical conclusions due to low statistical power, the limitations of the sample, limitations of the intervention itself, and the failure to track subjects longitudinally. Implications for nursing education, practice, and research are discussed. Recommendations for future studies were suggested.


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