• The Citrus Peel Miner, Marmara salictella, in Arizona Grapefruit in 1994

      Gibson, Roberta; Bacon, Dean; Langston, Dave; Kerns, David; Gibson, Richard; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-11)
      The life history of the citrus peel miner was investigated. The peel miner larvae were found in low levels in grapefruit throughout the summer. In September the infestation level rose to 10%. Peel miners were also found in oleanders, mesquites, grapes and tree cottons. Peel miners were found to infest at higher levels in the skirt of the tree (less than 32. A parasitic wasp of the larval stage was discovered
    • Influence of Nut Cluster Position on the Incidence of Viviparity for the Pecan Cultivars "Western Schley" and "Wichita"

      Gibson, Richard; Kilby, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Vivaparity, a significant quality- reducing condition found in pecans grown in warm, temperate climates, was evaluated by location of the pecan nut within the cluster in two varieties, "Wichita " and "Western Schley". Percentage vivaparity was not affected by position.
    • Pecan yields and nut quality as influenced by soil trenching and tree pruning

      Gibson, Richard; Nunan, Linda; Kilby, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      Trenching and pruning applications were placed on mature Wichita pecan trees in Maricopa, Arizona in 1998. Yield and nut quality data from the test are presented. Unfortunately, the cool, favorable growing weather minimized quality degradation during the growing season and confounded the test. Data presented probably do not reflect the true benefits of the treatments.
    • Performance of mature pecan varieties in the low desert 1997 and 1998

      Gibson, Richard; Nunan, Linda; Kilby, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      Mature pecan trees at Picacho, Arizona were evaluated for variety performance during 1997-98. Total average yield per tree, percent kernel and percent viviparity were observed. During 1997, a severe viviparity year, only Bradley, Cheyenne, Souix and Tejas showed viviparity values of 20% or lower. Tejas did not return an acceptable percent kernel leaving Bradley, Cheyenne and Souix as potential varieties able to withstand low desert growing conditions on a regular basis. In 1998, the cool growing season confounded the test and no conclusions were drawn from the data.
    • Performance of Mature Pecan Varieties in the Low Desert of Pinal County 1997-1999

      Kilby, Michael; Gibson, Richard; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Twelve varieties of pecans were evaluated for yield, viviparity, and nut quality. The commercially recommended varieties 'Western Schley' and 'Wichita' produced the greatest yields but also had the highest percentage of pregermination. The varieties 'Cheyenne' and 'Sioux' exhibit great potential for commercial production in the low desert of Arizona.
    • Rejuvenation of mature pecan trees by pruning

      Kilby, Michael; Gibson, Richard; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      Neglected mature 'Wichita' pecan trees were rejuvenated using various pruning techniques in 1997. Trees were pruned using proven horticultural techniques which included dehorning (cutting main scaffolds to within 2 feet of trunk) and cutting main scaffolds by 50%. To date the treatments have resulted in an increase in yield when compared to trees that received no pruning. In 1999 the grower has developed an orchard management program conducive to maximum production.
    • Rejuvenation of Neglected, Mature "Wichita" Pecan Trees By Corrective Pruning

      Gibson, Richard; Kilby, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-02)
      An attempt was made in 1997 to rejuvenate neglected, mature 'Wichita' pecan trees in a commercial Pinal County grove by applying two types of heading back pruning cuts. The treatments were applied during the dormant season prior to the growing season. The trees were pruned using proven horticultural techniques which included dehorning (cutting main scaffolds to within 2 feet of the trunk) and cutting main scaffolds by 50%. After four years of data, the trees receiving no pruning treatments are producing as well or better than trees to which the pruning treatments were applied. The data suggests that a return to normal irrigation and fertilization practices alone will return neglected, water-stressed trees to normal productivity as early as trees that have been headed-back.
    • Revitalizing "Wichita" Pecan Productivity Through Corrective Pruning - First Year Results

      Gibson, Richard; Kilby, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      A pruning study was established in stressed pecan trees to identify effective means of returning unproductive trees to full productivity. The study was comprised of two pruning systems and one untreated check. The number of nuts harvested from pruned trees was lower than that harvested from the unpruned trees, but the quality of the nuts from the pruned trees was improved when compared with the unpruned trees.