• Analysis and Evaluation of the Performance of Surface N-Fertigation on the Yuma Mesa

      Sanchez, C. A.; Zerihun, D.; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      The application of N-fertilizers mixed with a surface irrigation stream (surface N-fertigation) is widely practiced in the Yume Mesa. Guidelines for the efficient management of surface N-fertigation systems are needed. The purpose of the work reported herein is to evaluate the relative effectiveness of existing surface N-fertigation management practices in the Yuma Mesa. This has been accomplished through the following steps: (1) a complete set of performance indices that can be used to assess the relative merit of alternative management scenarios are identified and defined and Equations as well as solutions for quantifying the performance indices are proposed; (2) surface fertigation field experiments (using Br- as a tracer) were performed in two irrigation basins at the Yuma Mesa research farm of the University of Arizona during the fall season of 2000; (3) the spatial distribution as well as the application efficiency and adequacy of Br- applied with irrigation water was determined using the performance functions proposed herein; and (4) the results were analyzed to assess the merits and limitations of existing practices.
    • Applying roundup to the base of lemon tree canopies: effects on leaves, flowers, fruitlets, and yield

      McCloskey, William B.; Wright, Glenn C.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Dept. Plant Sciences, U. of A., Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center, Yuma, Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      The effect of Roundup on lemon trees (Citrus limon) was evaluated by repeatedly spraying 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 lb. a.i./acre (corresponding to 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5 quarts of Roundup Ultra/acre) on the bottom 20 to 24 inches of the tree canopies, over a three year period. The Roundup applications caused significant leaf injury in the sprayed area of the canopies and there was also significant defoliation of branches at the higher Roundup rates in all three years of the study. In 1996 after three Roundup applications, increasing rates of Roundup had no effect on flower or fruitlet production in either the sprayed or unsprayed portions of the tree canopies as judged by the counts collected from branches in each canopy zone. Similarly, in 1997 after five Roundup applications, and in 1998 after nine Roundup applications, increasing rates of Roundup had no effect on flower or fruitlet production in the sprayed or unsprayed portions of the tree canopies. Spraying Roundup on the bottom of the tree canopies did not reduce total lemon yield per tree in 1996, 1997 or 1998 at any of the application rates. In all three years of the study, increasing Roundup rates had no effect on the yield of the first or second ring picks or the percentage of the total crop picked on the first harvest date. Increasing Roundup rates also did not affect fruit size at any harvest date in 1996, 1997 or 1998. Similarly, increasing Roundup application rates did not affect fruit quality at any harvest in 1996, 1997 or 1998. Thus, there was no relationship between the rate of Roundup sprayed on the trees and yield, fruit size or quality in all three years of this study. The three years of data collected in this study indicate that accidental drift or inadvertent application of Roundup onto lemon trees when spraying weeds on the orchard floor has no significant effect on lemon tree productivity.
    • Applying Roundup to the Base of Lemon Tree Canopies: Preliminary Effects on Leaves, Flowers, Fruitlets, and Yield

      McCloskey, William B.; Wright, Glenn C.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike; Department of Plant Sciences; Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      The effect of Roundup on lemon trees was evaluated by repeatedly spraying 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 lb. a.i./acre on the bottom 20 to 24 inches of the tree canopies over a three year period. The Roundup applications caused significant leaf injury in the sprayed area of the canopies and there was also significant defoliation of branches at the higher Roundup rates in all three years of the study. In 1996, flower and fruitlet counts were not affected by the Roundup applications and the 1998 data were inconclusive. However, flower and fruitlet counts in 1997 in the sprayed zone of the canopy were significantly reduced by Roundup and the effect increased with increasing Roundup rate. The 1996 and 1997 yield data indicated that Roundup applied to the bottom 20 to 24 inches of the tree canopies did not significantly affect lemon yield. The preliminary data suggest that accidental drift or misapplication of Roundup on to lemon trees when spraying weeds on the orchard floor has no short-term effect on grove productivity.
    • Biology and Control of Lemon Tree Wood Rot Diseases

      Matheron, Michael E.; Porchas, Martin; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick; University of Arizona, Yuma Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      Brown heartwood rot is commonly found in mature lemon groves in southwestern Arizona. Two basidiomycete fungi, Antrodia sinuosa and Coniophora eremophila, have been isolated from symptomatic trees. A major difference between the two pathogens is that Antrodia forms spore-producing fruiting bodies on infected wood within lemon groves, whereas fruiting on lemon wood infected by Coniophora has not been observed. A third fungus, a species of Nodulisporium, recently was recovered from small dead lemon tree branches with an internal white wood rot. Experiments were conducted to compare the severity of wood rot caused by each of these pathogens. The highest rates of wood decay for each pathogen occurred from May through October, when the mean length of wood decay columns for Antrodia, Coniophora and Nodulisporium was 183, 94 and 146 mm, respectively, and the mean air temperature was 29°C. In comparison, the mean length of wood decay columns from November through April for the same pathogens was 35, 18 and 38 mm, respectively, with a mean air temperature of 17°C. When inoculated with Antrodia, Coniophora or Nodulisporium, the length of wood decay columns on 40- mm-diameter branches was 26, 38 and 24% larger, respectively, compared to wood decay on 10-mm-diameter branches. The length of wood decay columns on inoculated Lisbon lemon was always numerically greater than that on tested orange, grapefruit and tangelo trees. Compared to lemon, wood decay columns ranged from 45 (on grapefruit) to 62 %( on orange) shorter when inoculated with Antrodia, 52 (on orange) to 59% (on tangelo) for Coniophora and 20 (on tangelo) to 51% (on grapefruit) for Nodulisporium. Compared to non-treated branches, suppression of wood decay in the presence of a test fungicide ranged from 28 to 79% for Antrodia, 77 to 91% for Coniophora and 71 to 92% for Nodulisporium. For each pathogen, the lowest numerical degree of wood rot suppression occurred in the presence of trifloxystrobin (Flint), whereas the highest level of suppression was observed with propiconazole (Break). On greasewood, mesquite, Palo Verde and salt cedar, the length of wood decay columns ranged from 20 to 60 mm when inoculated with Antrodia, 1 to 63 mm for Coniophora and 24 to 90 mm for Nodulisporium. For all three wood-rotting fungi, resultant wood decay columns were always much greater on lemon compared to tested desert-dwelling plants. Current disease management strategies include minimizing branch fractures and other non-pruning wounds as well as periodic inspection of trees and removal of infected branches, including physical removal of all wood infected with Antrodia from the grove site.
    • Citrus Orchard Floor Management 2001: Comparison of a Disk, "Perfecta" Cultivator, and Weed Sensing Sprayer

      McCloskey, William B.; Wright, Glenn C.; Sumner, Christopher P.; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Department of Plant Sciences, Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center, University of Arizona, Yuma, Arizona; Yuma County Pest Abatement District, Yuma, Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      Mechanical (disk and Perfecta cultivator) and chemical weed control strategies were compared in a Yuma, AZ lemon orchard. In addition, an optical weed sensing sprayer (WeedSeeker) was evaluated for making post-emergence Roundup Ultramax herbicide applications. The use of pre-emergence herbicides in conjunction with the WeedSeeker spray units has the potential to significantly reduce the amount of post-emergence herbicide and water needed to spray flood irrigated citrus orchards. There was a relationship between weed ground cover and the area sprayed by the WeedSeeker units that indicated the maximum herbicide saving will occur a low weed densities. The use of the Kawasaki Mule with its superior suspension system allowed for faster spraying speeds than were possible with the tractor mounted sprayer and this also reduced spray volume per plot. Weed control was similar for the conventional and the WeedSeeker sprayers. Future investigations will include efforts to improve the estimation of percent weed groundcover, the use of higher rates of pre-emergence herbicides and the development of crop budgets based on experimental operations.
    • Citrus Peel Miner Marmara salictella Monitoring Techniques and Control Measures 1996-1997

      Maurer, M. A.; Kerns, D. L.; Tellez, T.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Citrus peel miner populations were monitored to evaluate various methods of trapping citrus peel miners. Observing 25 fruit per tree and 10 trees per block on the lower three feet of the tree canopy provided the best technique for determining the level of citrus peel miner infestations. The use of oleander plants, clear plates and green 3 inch diameter balls sprayed with Tangle-Trap were not effective in trapping citrus peel miner. In 1996, the first of September citrus leaf miner populations rose above the 10% infestation level. Success, Lorsban, Alert and Agri-Mek provided the highest mortality levels of citrus peel miner larvae. In citrus fruit, Success, Lorsban and Alert had the greatest efficacy of citrus peel miner larvae.
    • Commercial Evaluation of M-96-015 for Control of Citrus Mealybug, Woolly Whitefly and Citrus Thrips in Lemons

      Kerns, David L.; Tellez, Tony; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      M-96-015 did not appear to effectively control woolly whitefly but does appear to kill citrus mealybug. However, as with other insecticides coverage is a problem. The real benefit of M-96-015 towards citrus mealybug would occur if it prevented their spread. However, we were not able to measure this in this study. As with previous trials, M-96-015 is an effective citrus thrips material.
    • Development of Best Management Practices for Fertigation of Young Citrus Tree

      Thompson, Thomas L.; White, Scott A.; Walworth, James; Sower, Greg; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-02)
      'Newhall' navel oranges on 'Carrizo' rootstock were planted in Mar. 1997 at the Citrus Agricultural Center. The objectives of this experiment were: i) to determine the effects of N rate and fertigation frequency for microsprinkler-irrigated navel oranges on tree N status, and crop yield and quality; and ii) to develop Best Management Practices which promote optimum tree growth and production while minimizing nitrate leaching. The trees are equipped with a microsprinkler irrigation system. The experiment is a randomized complete block factorial with N rates of 0, 0.15, 0.30, and 0.45 lb N/tree/year, and fertigation frequencies of weekly, monthly, and three times per year. Unfertilized control trees are also included in the experimental design. Each of the ten treatments is replicated five times. The trees were harvested for the first time in Feb. 2001. Fruit were processed through an automatic fruit sizer, and fruit from each plot were further evaluated for fruit quality. Although unfertilized control trees had lower leaf N content than fertilized trees, fruit yield and quality of controls was no lower than fertilized trees. Similarly, there were few statistically significant differences in fruit yield and quality between trees receiving different N rates and fertigation frequencies.
    • Development of Best Management Practices for Fertigation of Young Citrus Trees

      Thompson, Thomas L.; White, Scott A.; Maurer, Michael A.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Microsprinkler irrigation offers excellent flexibility for site-specific management of water and nitrogen inputs for citrus orchards in the southwestern United States. Escalating water costs, declining water availability, and increasing regulation of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use are causing growers to adopt practices to improve water and N use efficiency. 'Newhall' navels on 'Carrizo' rootstock were planted in Jan. 1997 and an experiment was initiated. This experiment was continued during 1999. The objective of the experiment was to develop appropriate management guidelines for N fertigation of 3-4 year old microsprinkler-irrigated navel orange trees. Treatments were factorial combinations of three N rates (0.15, 0.30, 0.45 lb N tree⁻¹ yr⁻¹) and three fertigation frequencies (3x/year, monthly, weekly). An untreated control was included. Trunk diameter was not responsive to N rate or fertigation frequency. Leaf N in all treatments, even controls, remained above the critical level (2.5%). However, at each N rate leaf N was highest with the weekly fertigation frequency. Nitrate analyses of soil samples indicate that nitrate leaching was highest with the highest N rate and 3x/year fertigation. Frequent fertigation is recommended because it results in higher leaf N and less nitrate leaching.
    • Development of Best Management Practices for Fertigation of Young Citrus Trees, 2002 Report

      Thompson, Thomas L.; White, Scott A.; Walworth, James; Sower, Greg; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      'Newhall' navel oranges on 'Carrizo' rootstock were planted in Mar. 1997 at the Citrus Agricultural Center. The objectives of this experiment were to i) determine the effects of N rate and fertigation frequency for microsprinkler-irrigated navel oranges on tree N status, and crop yield and quality; and ii) develop Best Management Practices which promote optimum tree growth and production while minimizing nitrate leaching. The trees are equipped with a microsprinkler irrigation system. The experiment is a randomized complete block factorial with N rates of 0, 0.15, 0.30, and 0.45 lb N/tree/year, and fertigation frequencies of weekly, monthly, and three times per year. Unfertilized control trees are also included in the experimental design. Each of the ten treatments is replicated five times. The trees were harvested in Jan. 2002. Fruit were processed through an automatic fruit sizer, and fruit from each plot were further evaluated for fruit quality. Leaf N concentration was responsive to N rate, but not to fertigation frequency. Leaf N in all fertilized plots was above tissue critical levels. Fruit yield in fertilized plots was higher than in unfertilized plots, but, in fertilized treatments, there was no significant effect of N rate or fertigation frequency on fruit yield or quality.
    • Effect of Foliar Application of Benomyl on Severity of Septoria Leaf Spot on Pistachio in Southeastern Arizona

      Matheron, Michael E.; Kilby, Michael W.; Call, Robert; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      The fungicide, benomyl (Benlate) was foliar applied by a commercial air blast sprayer at the rate of 1.0 lb. a.i. per acre in early to late August. Treatments varied with a number of applications i.e. one or two and were compared to an untreated control. Benomyl significantly reduced leaf necrosis surrounding nut clusters and the number of leaf spot lesions when compared to control. One or two applications were equally effective in controlling Septoria leaf spot.
    • Effect of foliar boron sprays on yield and fruit quality of navel oranges

      Maurer, Michael A.; Taylor, Kathryn C.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      A field study was designed to determine if foliar boron (B) sprays could increase fruit set and yield of 'Parent Washington' navel oranges (Citrus sinensis). Treatments consisted of two application timings (prebloom and postbloom) and five application rates 0, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 ppm B as Solubor. Leaf B levels had a significant response to both application timing and rate. There were no significant difference in fruit quality or yield.
    • Effect of Foliar Boron Sprays on Yield and Fruit Quality of Navel Oranges in 1998 and 1999

      Maurer, Michael; Truman, James; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      A field study was designed to determine if foliar boron (B) sprays could increase fruit set and yield of 'Parent Washington' navel oranges (Citrus sinensis). Treatments consisted of two application timings (prebloom and postbloom) and five application rates 0, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 ppm B as Solubor. Leaf B levels had a significant response to both application timing and rate in 1998, but there were no significant differences in 1999. There were no significant difference in fruit quality or yield in either year.
    • Effect of fungicide treatments on incidence of powdery mildew of pecan and on pecan nut quality

      Olsen, M.; Rasmussen, S.; Nischwitz, C.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-02)
      Powdery mildew of pecan, caused by Microsphaera ulni, was observed on pecan shucks by the latter part of June 2000 in a commercial pecan orchard near Sahuarita, Arizona. Results of 1999 studies indicated that infection does not reduce nut quality. In order to determine effects of fungicide treatments and to substantiate results from 1999, preventive applications of micronized sulfur and azoxystrobin were initiated on June 8, 2000 in selected clusters in both Wichita and Western varieties. Trials were established in plots that had a high incidence of powdery mildew in 1999. Whole nut weights, kernel weights, or color ratings were not significantly different among clusters of nuts that were treated with fungicides and untreated nuts that were infected with powdery mildew. Percent disease incidence was 100% in untreated clusters, 0% in clusters treated with azoxystrobin every two weeks, and 5.3% (Wichita) and 8.8% (Western) in clusters treated with sulfur three times early in the season. Results indicate that disease did not affect nut weight or quality and that early preventive fungicide treatments are effective in controlling infections.
    • Effect of Organic Amendments on Lemon Leaf Tissue, Soil Analysis and Yield

      Zerkoune, Mohammed; Wright, Glenn; Kerns, David; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      An experiment was initiated in 2000 to study the feasibility of growing organic lemon in the southwest desert of Arizona. An eight-acre field was selected on Superstition sandy soil at the Mesa Agricultural Research Center to conduct this investigation. Lemon trees were planted at 25 feet spacing in 1998. The initial soil test in top 6 inches was 5 ppm nitrate-nitrogen and 4.9 ppm NaHCO3-P. Soil pH was 8.7 in the top 6 inches. Four treatments were applied in randomized complete block design repeated four times. The treatments were beef cattle feedlot manure and perfecta, clover and guano, guano and perfecta, and standard practice treatment. Soil samples were collected from 0-6 and 6-12 inches the first week of March 2001 and analyzed for NO₃-N NH₄-N, total nitrogen, organic matter and available P. Preliminary results showed no difference in NO₃-N, NH₄-N in 0 to 6 and 6 to 12 inches between treatments. Total nitrogen increased significantly from 0.0262% in standard treatment to 0.0375% in the manure treatment. Similarly, soil organic matter increased from 0.297% in standard treatment to 0.4337% in the manure perfecta treatment. Phosphorus level increased significantly from 6.962 ppm in guano perfecta to 11.187 PPM in manure perfecta treatment. Leaf tissue analysis indicated that nitrate level was influenced by treatment. Yields of Guano treatments were significantly greater than yields of the other treatments. Both commercial standard and organic treatments were equally effective in controlling citrus thrips, but repeated applications were required. Mite population has been detected at low level with no significant differences observed among treatments.
    • Effect of Powdery Mildew on Pecan Nut Weight and Quality

      Olsen, M.; Rasmussen, S.; Nischwitz, C.; Kilby, M.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Powdery mildew of pecan, caused by Microsphaera ulni, results in discoloration of pecan shucks, but its effects on yield and quality of kernels are not known. In 1999, powdery mildew was observed on pecan shucks by the latter part of June in a commercial pecan orchard near Sahuarita, Arizona. The fungus continued to be active throughout the summer. However, results of a field test comparing diseased and healthy nuts from two varieties of pecans indicate that powdery mildew did not affect nut weight or quality. Whole nut weights, kernel weights, color ratings or percentage of discarded nuts were not significant between paired clusters of nuts that were treated with fungicides and remained disease free and untreated nuts that were infected with powdery mildew. Although shucks may have a high percentage of area covered by powdery mildew, results from this trial indicate that fungicide treatments are not warranted.
    • Effect of Temperature and Moisture on Survival of Phytophthora in Citrus Grove Soil

      Matheron, Michael; Porchas, Martin; Maurer, Michael; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Before replanting a citrus grove in Arizona, different preplant cultural activities may be performed, such as immediate replanting of the new citrus grove, allowing soil to lay fallow for various lengths of time, or planting the site to alfalfa for one or more years before the new citrus grove is established. A study was conducted to compare the effect of these different cultural preplant practices on the survival of Phytophthora in citrus grove soils. In June, 1998, and July, 1999, a total of 18 soil samples were collected within mature lemon groves. Each initial bulk sample was pretested, found to contain Phytophthora parasitica, then thoroughly mixed and partitioned into 1-liter plastic containers, which were subjected to different environmental and cultural conditions. The soil in each 1-liter container was tested for the presence of P. parasitica 1 and 3.5 to 4 months later. All soil samples then were placed in the greenhouse and a 6-month-old Citrus volkameriana seedling was planted in soil samples not containing plants. Three 1-liter sub-samples from each of ten 7-liter volumes of soil incubated outside for three months were also planted to citrus in the greenhouse. The soil containing plants in the greenhouse was watered as needed for 3 months, then again tested for the presence of Phytophthora. Irrigating soil infested with Phytophthora parasitica, whether it was planted to a host (citrus) of the pathogen, planted to a non-host (alfalfa) of the pathogen, or not planted at all, did not lower the pathogen to nondetectable levels. Phytophthora became and remained nondetectable only in the soil samples that were not irrigated and subjected to mean temperatures of 35 to 37° C (94 to 98° F). On the other hand, the pathogen was detectable in some soil samples subjected to dryness at lower mean temperatures of 26 to 30° C (79 to 86° F) after a citrus seedling subsequently was grown in the soil for 3 months. A dry summer fallow period following removal of a citrus grove (including as much root material as possible) was the only cultural practice among those tested that reduced the level of Phytophthora to nondetectable levels in all soil samples tested.
    • Effective Management Tools for Septoria Leaf Spot of Pistachio in Arizona

      Call, Robert E.; Matheron, Michael E.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Septoria leaf spot was detected in the United States for the first time in 1964 within an experimental pistachio planting at Brownwood, Texas. The first observation of the same disease in Arizona pistachio trees did not occur until 1986. In 1988, a survey of the 2,000 acres of pistachio orchards in southeastern Arizona revealed a widespread incidence of the disease. Since the initial discovery of the disease, Septoria leaf spot has appeared annually in some of the Arizona pistachio acreage. The onset and severity of the disease is influenced by summer rainfall that occurs in this region. Disease management trials conducted since 1992 have shown that as few as two applications of chlorothalonil in July and August can virtually prevent disease development. Applications of copper hydroxide or benomyl alone or in combination also effectively arrest disease development. Leaves around nut clusters on infected trees not receiving fungicide treatments were usually senescent at crop maturity, whereas leaves on treated trees showed no sign of senescence. Pistachio trees infected with Septoria leaf spot and not treated with an effective fungicide can defoliate in the autumn up to 2 months prematurely.
    • Effects of fluid nitrogen fertigation and rate on microsprinkler irrigated grapefruit

      Thompson, Thomas L.; Maurer, Michael A.; Weinert, Tom L.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-11)
      Microsprinkler irrigation offers excellent flexibility for site-specific management of water and nitrogen inputs for citrus orchards in the southwestern United States. Escalating water costs, declining water availability, and increasing regulation of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use are causing growers to adopt practices to improve water and N use efficiency. A three-year field experiment was initiated in the spring of 1996 on six-year-old pink grapefruit trees at the University of Arizona Citrus Agricultural Center. The objectives of this experiment are to i) evaluate the effects of fertigation frequency and fluid N application rate on the yield and fruit quality of microsprinkler irrigated grapefruit, and ii) develop best management guidelines for fluid N application frequency and rate for microsprinkler irrigated citrus. Treatments include a factorial combination of two N rates (recommended and 2 the recommended rate) and three fertigation frequencies (weekly, monthly, and tri-monthly). Minimal treatment effects were observed during the first season due to the influence of previous management practices. During the second season, fertilized trees yielded greater than the control trees. There was no significant difference between N rates, but fruit yield was generally higher with monthly or weekly fertigation. Leaf tissue samples collected during the second and third growing seasons showed increasing leaf N with increasing fertigation frequency at the high N rate.
    • Efficacy of Insecticides to Citrus Thrips on Lemons in Yuma Arizona 1997

      Kerns, David L.; Tellez, Tony; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Three small plot efficacy trials were conducted evaluating different insecticide rotation regimes using commercially available insecticides and the effectiveness of new insecticide chemistries to control citrus thrips. Because of its long residual activity, and ability to control post- application egg hatches, Carzol appears to be the product that best fits the petal fall application window. Agri-Mek, Baythroid, Dimethoate or Vydate are probably good follow -up insecticides. However, Agri-Mek and Baythroid will probably provide greater control, especially under hotter conditions. If temperatures are cool, Agri-Mek looks good at reduced rates. The best insecticide for subsequent applications depends on temperatures and what was previously applied. Avoid making back -to -back applications of the same materials, and Dimethoate or Vydate applications should probably be followed by Carzol to catch post- application egg hatches. Overall, Vydate appears to be very similar to Dimethoate in efficacy and residual activity, while Baythroid appears to be slightly better. Although the addition of Lannate to Dimethoate does slightly enhance thrips control, the additional cost probably does not justify the tank mix. Of the new chemistries (Alert, Success, Ni-25, and M-96-015) evaluated, Success and M-96-015 appeared to offer the best fruit protection. However, M-96-015 does not appear to be very effective in killing the thrips, but is very effective in repelling them. Also, M-96-015 will need to be applied at a high gallonage, i.e. 500 gal/A. None of the new products tested appear to fit the petal fall application window very well. Ni-25, Alert and Success appear to lack the residual activity of Carzol, and M-96-015 should not be used as a clean-up material but preventively following Carzol at petal fall.