• The Ash Whitefly as a Pest of Citrus

      Byrne, David N.; Butler, Marvin; Department of Entomology (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-01)
    • California Red Scale Again Eradicated from Yuma County

      McDonald, H. H.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1991-01)
      Since 1973, Yuma County has had three apparently unrelated infestations of California Red Scale (CRS). The Yuma County citrus Pest Control District (YCCPCD) was successful in eradicating the first two in 1980 and 1984, respectively. We are continuing our spray program on the third, but our detection methods indicate that this infestation has now also been eradicated.
    • California Red Scale Eradicated in Yuma County Again

      McDonald, Herbert H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-12)
      For the second time in two decades, the Yuma County Citrus Pest Control District has been successful in eradicating an infestation of California Red Scale in a commercial citrus grove within its boundaries. The first infestation, found in 1973, was declared eradicated in 1980. The latest infestation was found in 1984 and will be eradicated in record time. Eradication can be declared early next year after the third series of three sprayings each.
    • Citrus Peel Miner Marmara salictella Monitoring Techniques and Control Measures 1996-1997

      Maurer, M. A.; Kerns, D. L.; Tellez, T.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Citrus peel miner populations were monitored to evaluate various methods of trapping citrus peel miners. Observing 25 fruit per tree and 10 trees per block on the lower three feet of the tree canopy provided the best technique for determining the level of citrus peel miner infestations. The use of oleander plants, clear plates and green 3 inch diameter balls sprayed with Tangle-Trap were not effective in trapping citrus peel miner. In 1996, the first of September citrus leaf miner populations rose above the 10% infestation level. Success, Lorsban, Alert and Agri-Mek provided the highest mortality levels of citrus peel miner larvae. In citrus fruit, Success, Lorsban and Alert had the greatest efficacy of citrus peel miner larvae.
    • Control of Ctirus Thrips by Avermectin

      Rethwisch, M. D.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
      Two rates of Avermectin were mound- applied; one treatment of Avermectin B one of Carzol were applied by air to citrus in April for control of citrus thrips. Plots were sampled by beating new terminal growth and counting thrips. Ground applications had fewer thrips than applications made by air. Avermectin B1 treatments had significantly fewer thrips than Carzol at all sample dates.
    • Control of Insects and Mites Associated with Citrus in Yuma, Arizona

      Byrne, David N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-12)
      A variety of insecticides have been tested during the last three years to keep pace with the ever-present demand for effective materials to control mites and thrips on citrus. This need is particularly acute with the recent loss of dicofol (Kelthane), which for years was an industry standard for mite control. Some of the more promising new compounds include Avermectin and NC 21314. Comments are included concerning the registration status of some of the compounds we tested. Cautions are given concerning the development of resistance to compounds which are soon to be available.
    • Eradication of California Red Scale in Yuma County - An Ongoing Battle

      McDonald, H. H.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
      During the last 15 years, the Yuma County Citrus Pest Control District (YCCPCD) has twice eradicated infestations of California Red Scale within the district. A third infestation, found in late 1984 is currently being fought with eradication as the goal.
    • An Evaluation of Biological Agents for Control of Citrus Nematode and Liohippelates Eye Gnat

      Nigh, Edward L. Jr.; Sumner, Christopher; Svodoba, Thomas; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-11)
      Biological agents have been employed in a series of experiments to evaluate their efftcacy,in control of the citrus nematode and Liohippelates eye gnat in the Yuma mesa area. Steinernema riobravis, an entomopathological nematode, considered climatically adapted to western Arizona temperatures, was selected from commercially available sources. Three field trials and a greenhouse study utilizing the nematodes at population ratés of one and two billion juveniles per acre were each unsuccessful in reducing the nematode or insect pest. Poor viability and survival were attributed to the negative results in each of the investigations. The microbial nematicide, DiTera, which was included in two limited trials, was found to be highly effective in suppression of citrus nematode populations infecting Yuma citrus. These results have prompted Abbott Laboratories, manufactures of the product; to establish two demonstration plots in the Yuma mesa area.
    • Evaluation of Materials for Control of Citrus Thrips

      Butler, Marvin; Byrne, David N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-12)
      The control of citrus thrips is a major concern for citrus growers in the Yuma area. Five materials were evaluated for control of citrus thrips on Lisbon lemons at the Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center during July and August of 1985. Although there was no statistically significant differences between treatments, Mavrik appeared to provide the best control of the materials tested. Dimethoate (Cygon) and formetanate hydrochloride (Carzol) were not tested.
    • Evaluation of Potato Leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., Populations in Arizona Citrus

      Byrne, David N.; Draeger, Erich A.; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-11)
      The potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., is a significant pest in the United States, and elsewhere, of alfalfa and potatoes In Arizona and in Coastal and Central California it can also be a pest of citrus. In 1994 and 1995 we collected information concerning their seasonal abundance in a large citrus orchard near Newman Peak Arizona. To do so we employed yellow sticky traps around the orchard periphery, at the same time using a D-Vac® vacuum sampler in the weeds growing in the interior of the orchard During both years peak populations occurred near mid April. This was correlated with a drop in relative humidity and a rise in ambient air temperature.
    • Pesticide Efficacy Trials for Citrus Flat Mites on Oranges, 1988

      Byrne, D. N.; Butler, M. D.; Draeger, E. A.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
    • Seasonal Abundance and Field Testing of a Citrus Thrips Temperature Development Model in Arizona Citrus

      Rethwisch, Michael D.; McDaniel, Charles; Peralia, Manuel; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Citrus thrips populations (adults and nymphs) were monitored through the spring of 1991-1992 in several locations throughout most of the commercial citrus production areas in Yuma County to determine if citrus thrips seasonality was similar to that previously reported in California. Study findings indicate that seasonality is similar throughout the winter and very early spring. Adult thrips numbers increase rapidly in groves due to attractive foliage, whether it is weeds or citrus. High nymph numbers did not always follow adult peaks, and were not statistically correlated. Predatory mites and rains may have affected 1992 results.
    • Update on Fuller's Rose Beetle in Arizona

      Rethwisch, M. D.; Sumner, C.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
      Initial studies of Fuller rose beetle (FRB) biology have found some adult emergence in late June and early July. No adults woe found in foliage in May or early June, nor was activity noted in August and early September. FRB were not found in early October, but they began expected major emergence in mid-October. Several FRB collected did not have fused wings, atypical for this species. This finding suggests flight ability in FRB, currently unknown to occur.