• Continued Evaluation of N Fertilization Practices for Surface Irrigated Lemons

      Sanchez, Charles A.; Wright, Glenn C.; Peralta, Manuel; Wright, Glenn; Yuma Agricultural Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      Much of the citrus produced in southwestern Arizona is grown on sandy soils. Because these soils have a low ion exchange capacity, are highly permeable to water, and are prone to nitrate leaching, achieving efficient N management presents a continuing challenge. A field study was conducted on a superstition sand to evaluate the response of lemons to combinations of soil and foliar applied N. Lemon yields significantly increased by soil applied N. Foliar N increased yields of lemons the first harvest at the lower soil N rates. However, there were no other significant responses to foliar N. Overall, there were few meaningful changes in fruit quality to N fertilization. The N content of the leaves increased linearly to soil N application
    • Development of Best Management Practices for Fertigation of Young Citrus Trees

      Thompson, Thomas L.; White, Scott A.; Maurer, Michael A.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Microsprinkler irrigation offers excellent flexibility for site-specific management of water and nitrogen inputs for citrus orchards in the southwestern United States. Escalating water costs, declining water availability, and increasing regulation of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use are causing growers to adopt practices to improve water and N use efficiency. 'Newhall' navels on 'Carrizo' rootstock were planted in Jan. 1997 and an experiment was initiated. This experiment was continued during 1999. The objective of the experiment was to develop appropriate management guidelines for N fertigation of 3-4 year old microsprinkler-irrigated navel orange trees. Treatments were factorial combinations of three N rates (0.15, 0.30, 0.45 lb N tree⁻¹ yr⁻¹) and three fertigation frequencies (3x/year, monthly, weekly). An untreated control was included. Trunk diameter was not responsive to N rate or fertigation frequency. Leaf N in all treatments, even controls, remained above the critical level (2.5%). However, at each N rate leaf N was highest with the weekly fertigation frequency. Nitrate analyses of soil samples indicate that nitrate leaching was highest with the highest N rate and 3x/year fertigation. Frequent fertigation is recommended because it results in higher leaf N and less nitrate leaching.
    • Development of Best Management Practices for Fertigation of Young Citrus Trees, 2003 Report

      Thompson, Thomas L.; White, Scott A.; Walworth, James; Sower, Greg; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      ‘Newhall’ navel oranges on ‘Carrizo’ rootstock were planted in Mar. 1997 at the Citrus Agricultural Center. The objectives of this experiment, conducted during 2000 - 2003, were to i) determine the effects of N rate and fertigation frequency for microsprinkler-irrigated navel oranges on tree N status, and crop yield and quality; and ii) develop Best Management Practices which promote optimum tree growth and production while minimizing nitrate leaching. The trees were equipped with a microsprinkler irrigation system. The experiment was a randomized complete block factorial with N rates of 0, 0.15, 0.30, and 0.45 lb N/tree/year, and fertigation frequencies of weekly, monthly, and three times per year. Each of the ten treatments was replicated five times. The trees were harvested in December or January of each growing season. Fruit were processed through an automatic fruit sizer, and fruit from each plot were further evaluated for fruit quality. Leaf N concentration and fruit yield of 4-6 year old trees were responsive to N rate, but not to fertigation frequency. Fruit quality and packout were not significantly affected by either N rate or fertigation frequency. Fruit yield was optimized at annual N rates of 0.25 lb/tree (four-year-old trees) to 0.35 lb/tree (six-year-old trees) during this experiment. We propose new tissue guidelines for guiding N fertilization of young microsprinkler-irrigated navel oranges.
    • Effect of Organic Amendments on Lemon Leaf Tissue, Soil Analysis and Yield

      Zerkoune, Mohammed; Wright, Glenn; Kerns, David; Wright, Glenn; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      An experiment was initiated in 2000 to study the feasibility of growing organic lemons in the southwest desert of Arizona. An eight-acre field was selected on Superstition sandy soil at the Mesa Agricultural Research Center to conduct this investigation. Lemon trees were planted at 25 x 25 feet spacing in 1998. The initial soil test in top 6 inches was 5 ppm nitrate-nitrogen and 4.9 ppm NaHCO3-P. Soil pH was 8.7 in the top 6 inches. Four treatments were applied in randomized complete block design repeated four times. The treatments were beef cattle feedlot manure and perfecta, clover and guano from 2000 to 2002, cowpea and guano in 2003, and guano and perfecta, and standard practice treatment. Soil samples were collected from 0-6 and 6-12 inches the first week of March 2003 and analyzed for available nutrients. Results showed a difference for most nutrients in 0 to 6 and 6 to 12 inches between treatments. Nitrate- nitrogen increased significantly from 3.25 ppm in standard treatment to 19.10 ppm in the manure treatment. Similarly, soil organic matter increased from 0.1% in standard treatment to 0.2% in the manure perfecta treatment. Phosphorus level increased significantly from 7 ppm in guano perfecta to 56.5 ppm in manure perfecta treatment. Leaf tissue analysis indicated that nitrate level was influenced by treatment. Both commercial standard and organic treatments were equally effective in controlling citrus thrips, but repeated applications were required. Mite population has been detected at low level with no significant differences observed among treatments.
    • Foliar applications of Lo-Biuret Urea and Potassium Phosphite to Navel Orange trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Peña, Marco; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      This experiment was established in January 2000 in a block of ‘Washington’ navel orange trees at Verde Growers, Stanfield, AZ. Treatments included: normal grower practice, winter low biuret (LB) urea application, summer LB urea application, winter LB urea application plus winter and spring potassium phosphite, winter LB urea application plus summer potassium phosphite, and normal grower practice plus spring potassium phosphite. Each treatment was applied to approximately four acres of trees. For 2000-01, yields ranged from 40 to 45 lbs. per tree, and there was no effect of treatments upon total yield, and only slight effect upon fruit size, grade and quality. For 2001-02, there was a slight effect of treatment upon yield as LB urea led to improved yield, while potassium phosphite led to reduced yield. Normal grower practice was intermediate between these two extremes. For 2002-03, we noted a large increase in yield, however the yield data was lost when the block was inadvertently harvested.
    • Response of Micro-Sprinkler Irrigated ‘Lisbon’ lemons to N Rate and Source on a Superstition Sand

      Sanchez, C. A.; Peralta, M.; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      Much of the citrus produced in southwestern Arizona is grown on sandy soils. Because these soils have a low ion exchange capacity, are highly permeable to water, and are prone to nitrate leaching, achieving efficient N management presents a continuing challenge. Studies were conducted during 1999, 2000, and 2001 to evaluate the response of micro-sprinkler irrigated lemons to N rate (0, 1.8, and 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1) and N source (UN32, CAN-17, CN9, and mixed program) on Superstition Sand. Lemon yield increased by N rate during the first and second harvests in 1999, 2000, and 2001. In 1999, yields increased linearly to 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1 but in 2000 and 2001 yields were maximized at 1.8 kg N tree-1 yr-1. In 1999 where larger increments of N were applied over a smaller time period relative to the other seasons, UN32 seemed to decrease yields at the highest N rate. There were no significant effects to N source in 2000 and 2001.