• Nutritional Status of Wine Grap Cultivars Grown in Southern Arizona

      Kilby, Michael W.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Ten winegrape vineyards consisting of different cultivars were leaf petiole sampled at bloomtime. Petioles were analyzed and results composited for the survey. There were indications that boron, iron, nitrogen and phosphorus were nutrients where potential problems (deficiencies) were likely to occur. This survey supplied information for the basis of developing a monitoring program on an annual basis.
    • Pruning Methods Affect Yield and Fruit Quality of 'Merlot' and 'Sauvignon Blanc' Grapevines

      Kilby, Michael W.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      One red and one white cultivar of winegrapes grown in Southern Arizona was pruned to four different methods. The red cultivar was 'Merlot' and the white was 'Sauvignon Blanc'. The pruning methods were 2 bud spur, 4 bud spur, cane and basal buds only. The basal bud treatment was eliminated for 'Sauvignon Blanc'. The 4 bud spur method resulted in significantly greater yield when compared to the other methods. Fruit produced from the basal bud only treatment resulted in fruit that was significantly greater in pH and acid content. The 'Sauvignon Blanc' cultivar had significantly higher yield with cane pruning with no difference in fruit quality.
    • The Response of Table Grape Growth, Production, and Ripening to Water Stress

      Garrot, D. J.; Gibson, R. D. Jr.; Kilby, M. W.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Four year old 'Flame Seedless' grapevines, located in a commercial vineyard, were subjected to increased water stress levels based on infrared canopy temperatures and the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) for two years. CWSI levels were approximately .18, .30 and .33 for the wet, medium and dry treatments. In the first year there were no significant differences in yield however, there was a significant reduction in the amount of water applied in both the medium and dry treatments when compared to the wet treatment. In addition, the wet treatment had significantly greater growth during the first growing season when comparing pruning weights.