• Update on Fuller's Rose Beetle in Arizona

      Rethwisch, M. D.; Sumner, C.; Butler, Marvin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-12)
      Initial studies of Fuller rose beetle (FRB) biology have found some adult emergence in late June and early July. No adults woe found in foliage in May or early June, nor was activity noted in August and early September. FRB were not found in early October, but they began expected major emergence in mid-October. Several FRB collected did not have fused wings, atypical for this species. This finding suggests flight ability in FRB, currently unknown to occur.
    • Use of a Slow Release Triazone-Based Nitrogen Fertilizer on Lemon Trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Peña, Marco A.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike; Department of Plant Sciences, U. of A., Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-10)
      Trisert CB replaced conventional foliar applied low-biuret urea and liquid urea ammonium nitrate in a typical N fertilization regime, a urea triazone based N source. There was no yield decrease, change in fruit size or grade with the use of the Trisert CB. There were no differences in leaf P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn or Zn concentration. Occasionally, leaf N concentration of trees supplied with foliar applied Trisert CB was higher than that of the control treatment.
    • Use of Plant Growth Regulators for Improving Lemon Fruit Size - 2005

      Wright, Glenn C.; Wright, Glenn; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Lemons were treated with several plant growth regulators for the 2005-06 season, with the hope of improving fruit size. These PGR’s included CropSet, Accel, Maxim, Messenger and MT350. Although there were some increases in yield, these were just trends, and were not statistically significant. Similarly, there was no improvement in fruit size with application of the treatment
    • Use of Plant Growth Regulators for Improving Lemon Fruit Size - 2006

      Wright, Glenn C.; Wright, Glenn; Department of Plant Sciences, U. of A., Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-10)
      Lemons were treated with several plant growth regulators for the 2006-07 season, with the hope of improving fruit size. These PGR’s included Bluestim, Accel, Maxim and MT1350. Although there were some increases in yield, these were just trends, and were not statistically significant. Similarly, there was no improvement in fruit size with application of the treatments.
    • Using Feeding Stimulants to Increase Insecticidal Control of Citrus Thrips

      Kerns, David L.; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004)
      Carzol and Success with and without the addition of the feeding stimulants molasses and bee-collected pollen were evaluated for their control of citrus thrips on lemons on the Yuma Mesa. Although normal use rate of Carzol and Success were efficacious toward citrus thrips, the addition of either molasses or pollen to these insecticides as a means of increasing efficacy at low rates was not encouraging. At no point did the feeding stimulants appear to increase the efficacy of the same rate of Carzol when used alone, and it appeared that the additives may have actually decreased the efficacy of Success.
    • Web-based IPM Resources for Arizona's Citrus Growers Final Report

      Jones, Jennifer S.; Kerns, David L.; Matheron, Michael E.; McCloskey, William B.; Fournier, Al; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004)
      We proposed creating a user-friendly web site that would provide independent, research-based, integrated pest management information to Arizona’s citrus growers and PCAs. This citrus IPM website, located at http://cals.arizona.edu/crops/citrus/ was created and integrated within an existing web site, the Arizona Crop Information Site (ACIS) http://cals.arizona.edu/crops. The Citrus IPM web site was launched on April 15, 2004.
    • Woodrat Control in Citrus Groves with Zinc Phosphide and Diphacinone

      Kerns, David L.; Sullivan, Lawrence M., 1939-; Wright, Glenn; Gibson, Rick (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-11)
      Two studies were conducted investigating the efficacy of Prozap (zinc phosphide), Ramik Green, and Ramik Brown (diphacinone) rodenticides on woodrats infesting citrus. Based primarily on using feeding activity as an indication of population density, Zinc phosphide (ZP) provided a rapid knockdown of the rat population, and offered 60 to 75% control. However, this product is known to cause "bait-shyness" following the initial application so additional control with subsequent applications of ZP targeting the same rat population would not likely result in a significant increase in control. Ramik Green and Ramik Brown are slow acting anticoagulant rodenticides, and performed similarly to each other. Anticoagulant rodenticides are not known to cause bait-shyness. In this study, these products only offered 20 to 38% control, but it is possible that these values may be artificially low since the rats may have been preferentially feeding on stored oat groats used to gauge feeding activity rather than consuming the anticoagulant baits.