• Fall Planted, Late Maturing Onion Variety Trial

      Clark, L. J.; Walser, R.; Carpenter, E. W.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Thirteen late maturing onion varieties were planted in the fall of 1998 and grown in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Bulbs were pulled and the tops removed in early June. Three NuMex varieties, Mesa, Starlite and BR1, produced the best yields. Yields are shown in tabular form together with size distribution and quality characteristics.
    • Field Evaluation of Broccoli Varieties Grown in Southwest Low Desert Soils

      Zerkoune, Mohammed A.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Based on acreage, broccoli is the third largest vegetable crop in Yuma County, after head lettuce, and romaine. It generates over $36 000000 a year. Efforts are continuously made by both seed industry and growers to grow better varieties that respond to consumers’ choice. Selection of newly adapted varieties is made based on agronomic performance as well as commercial value. Stand uniformity, disease resistance, color, head shape, and head size are among characteristics that are evaluated. The objective of this demonstration trial is to evaluate the characteristics of new varieties grown under standard cultural practices. Twelve varieties were tested at Yuma Agricultural Research Center. No incidence of disease was observed and the overall evaluation rating was greater than 4 indicating that all varieties tested will do well under similar growing conditions and planting date. Significant head diameter and plant height were observed among varieties tested.
    • Field Evaluation of Cauliflower Varieties Grown in Southwest Low Desert Soils

      Zerkoune, Mohammed A.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Selection of adapted varieties to environmental factors and soil types are paramount to growing profitable cauliflower crops. Varieties are selected for uniform maturity, field holding capability, head size, shape and color. The objective of this demonstration trial is to evaluate new and existing commercial varieties under standard field conditions. Seven varieties were planted in a single row and evaluated at Yuma Agricultural Research Center (YAC) for their agronomic characteristics and their commercial values. All varieties tested performed well with an overall rating of 4 or better, indicating that when planted under similar conditions and planting dates, these varieties are expected to do well. However a significant head weight and head diameter difference was observed among varieties tested.
    • Field Evaluation of Crisp-head Lettuce Varieties Grown in Southwest Low Desert Soils

      Zerkoune, Mohammed A.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Crisp-head lettuce plays an important role in Yuma’s economy. An estimated 51000 acres are cropped to large number of varieties each year with planting season that spreads from late August to March. Three demonstration sites and three planting dates were selected to compare new and existing varieties of head lettuce on growers’ fields using standard farming practices. Selected growth parameters were evaluated throughout the growing season. Results indicate that varieties tested at JV Farms in Welton and at Yuma Agricultural Center (YAC) are expected to do well if grown under similar conditions and planting time. Some varieties tested during the second planting slot on Doug Melon Farm experienced some incidence of diseases. All three planting sites showed a significant head weight difference and two out of three planting sites showed a significant head diameter difference.
    • Lettuce Variety Trial

      Clark, L. J.; Walser, R.; Carpenter, E. W.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Eleven head lettuce varieties and four leaf lettuce varieties were grown in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1998. Desertgreen variety of head lettuce from Harris Moran produced a crop with the best head weight, size and firmness rating. Premiere variety followed closely behind. Of the leaf lettuce varieties tested, Saguaro Romaine produced the best quality and quantity product. Per acre yields are calculated for each variety in the study.
    • Melon Variety Trial

      Clark, L. J.; Walser, R.; Carpenter, E. W.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Seven cantaloupe varieties and two Honeydew melon varieties were grown in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1998. Varieties were picked regularly during the growing season. Yields are shown in tabular form to indicate how each variety performed during the season.
    • Squash Variety Trial

      Clark, L. J.; Walser, R.; Carpenter, E. W.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Five Zucchini varieties and four yellow crook/straight-necked squash were grown in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1998. Varieties were picked regularly during the growing season. Yields are shown in tabular form and also graphically to indicate how each variety performed throughout the season.
    • Sweet Corn Variety Trial

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Neff, R. A.; Martin, S. T.; Byrne, David N.; Baciewicz, Patti (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-08)
      Sixteen sweet corn varieties were grown in replicated small plot trials with two dates of planting at the Safford Agricultural Center in 1999. Candy Corner ranked number one and two in the early and late dates of planting, respectively, and FMX 413 ranked number one in the later date of planting study. Both varieties produced over 2,500 dozen ears per acre. Sugar readings were made and tabulated for all varieties using a portable refractometer.