Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFrizvold, George
dc.contributor.authorTronstad, Russell
dc.contributor.authorMortensen, Jorgen
dc.contributor.editorSilvertooth, Jeffen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-15T18:19:32Z
dc.date.available2011-12-15T18:19:32Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/197451
dc.description.abstractThis study uses a quadratic programming model to estimate impacts of Bt cotton adoption on consumer benefits, cotton program outlays, and producer returns, by state and by grower adoption status. Three scenarios were considered simulating low, moderate, and high impacts of Bt cotton adoption. For the moderate impact scenario, U.S. benefits from Bt cotton adoption grew from $44 million in 1996 to $66 million in 1998. Annual U.S. consumer benefits ranged from $46– $55 million. Benefits to Bt adopters grew from $57 million in 1996 to $97 million in 1998. Losses to non-adopters fell from -$59 million in 1996 to -$8 million in 1998 as rising commodity program payments countered the impact of lower prices. In 1998, gains to Arizona Bt cotton adopters (net of adoption costs) were about $9 million, averaging over $15,000 per adopting farm.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1170en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.titleEconomic Impacts of Bt Cotton Adoption: A National and Regional Assessmenten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T23:52:43Z
html.description.abstractThis study uses a quadratic programming model to estimate impacts of Bt cotton adoption on consumer benefits, cotton program outlays, and producer returns, by state and by grower adoption status. Three scenarios were considered simulating low, moderate, and high impacts of Bt cotton adoption. For the moderate impact scenario, U.S. benefits from Bt cotton adoption grew from $44 million in 1996 to $66 million in 1998. Annual U.S. consumer benefits ranged from $46– $55 million. Benefits to Bt adopters grew from $57 million in 1996 to $97 million in 1998. Losses to non-adopters fell from -$59 million in 1996 to -$8 million in 1998 as rising commodity program payments countered the impact of lower prices. In 1998, gains to Arizona Bt cotton adopters (net of adoption costs) were about $9 million, averaging over $15,000 per adopting farm.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
az117010a-2000.pdf
Size:
32.64Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record