• Fall Armyworm Control on Sweet Corn with Granular Insecticide

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Several seasons of work indicate that topical application of granular pesticides to the whorl of fall grown sweet corn will effectively control the fall armyworm. First application to be made when the corn is approximately 12 inches high, followed by one or two additional applications at intervals of one week. The following three materials: 5 percent Diazinon granular, 5 percent Zectran granular, and 2 percent Endrin granular are the most promising when applied at 20-30 pounds per acre.
    • Insect Control on Cabbage with New Pesticide Compounds

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A number of different chemicals have been evaluated for control of cabbage loopers and other lepidopterous pests of cole crops over the past several years. These materials are usually formulated as dusts or emulsifiable concentrates but some have been prepared as wettable powders or granular formulations. Some are more effective against one species of insect than another. Only a very few of the prospective pesticides passed all the required testing and became available commercially.
    • Lettuce Insect Control with Experimental Insecticide Compounds

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A number of chemical compounds have been field evaluated as potential pesticides for control of insects on lettuce over the past several years. The important pests of fall planted lettuce being the cabbage looper, beet armyworm and corn earworm. In addition to the chemical compounds, the disease organism Bacillus Thuringiensis was used. It is slower in acting, but can be quite effective, particularly against the cabbage looper. Some of the chemical compounds which have been evaluated and are now available commercially are Sevin, Dibrom and Bidrin. This evaluation will continue as new and possibly more effective materials are made available.
    • Low Volume Spray Applications of Technical Malathion to Vegetable Crops

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      An experimental application of technical grade malathion was made by helicopter to a mixed planting of vegetables on the University of Arizona Mesa Experiment Station. Technical malathion at the rate of one pint per acre was not phytotoxic to onions, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. This dosage did not satisfactorily control cabbage loopers and beet armyworms.
    • Potato Insect Control with Granular Systemic Insecticides

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Ten percent granular formulations of phorate and Di-Syston at 20 pounds per acre will effectively control psyllids, aphids and thrips on potatoes. Two years study varying the placement of granular systemic insecticides in the soil in relation to the seed piece has not produced any significant differences in the insect control. The yields from plots in which the granules were placed four inches to the side and two inches below the seed piece were greater. All were better than the untreated check. Of two new systemic insecticides applied as granules at planting time, the material US-21149 (Temik R) gave outstanding insect control and above average yields on Kennebec variety potatoes. Compound NIA-10242 gave less effective insect control and yields below UC-21149.