• Cantaloup Bed Shape Modification for Mechanical Harvest

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Current Arizona cultural practices for cantaloup are not compatable with mechanized harvesting equipment now being developed for cantaloup. Mechanical harvesters will require a uniformly sloped bed, preferably flat, at harvest time. Experiments thus far indicate that this condition can be met by reshaping the conventional bed after the plants have emerged.
    • Mechanical Harvesting of Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Research work aimed at developing a selective mechanical harvester for crisphead lettuce was initiated in 1961. During the course of the project, two experimental machines were constructed. Commercial development of the harvester was assumed by Lockwood Grader Corporation in 1964 under terms of a contract between Lockwood and the Arizona Research Foundation. Lockwood is now in the process of constructing a four row prototype harvester that will be capable of harvesting 1.5 acres of lettuce per hour.
    • Precision Planting Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Compared to current planting practices using naked lettuce seed, precision planting coated lettuce seed can result in substantially reduced thinning costs, increases in number of marketable lettuce heads per acre, and higher average head weight. The use of coated seed, however, requires more attention to seedbed preparation, planting depths, irrigation schedules, and stand maintenance. Hill - dropping naked seed does not appear to offer advantages over conventional planting practices except in a slight reduction of seed cost per acre.