• Cantaloup Bed Shape Modification for Mechanical Harvest

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Current Arizona cultural practices for cantaloup are not compatable with mechanized harvesting equipment now being developed for cantaloup. Mechanical harvesters will require a uniformly sloped bed, preferably flat, at harvest time. Experiments thus far indicate that this condition can be met by reshaping the conventional bed after the plants have emerged.
    • Cantaloup Harvest Aids

      Larsen, W. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Cucurbit Virus Investigations

      Nelson, Merritt R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Continuing studies on cucurbit viruses have reinforced previous conclusions that these diseases are the most important factors in cantaloup crown blight. Epidemiological studies of the several viruses concerned are concentrated on ascertaining the sources of virus for cantaloup infection and developing methods for the mathematical analysis of linear spread of virus. New methods of identification of the viruses are being developed through the use of serology. This involves biophysical studies of the viruses in the development of purification techniques. Purification viruses must be obtained before antisera can be developed.
    • Cucurbita Research

      Bemis, W. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Economic Feasibility of Cantaloup Production in Navajo County, Arizona

      Underwood, Amos; Farrish, Raymond (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Effects of Magnesium, Nitrogen, and Micronutrients on the Yield and Incidence of Crown Blight of Cantaloups in Yuma Area

      Turner, Fred Jr.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Yield differences resulting from magnesium, nitrogen, and micronutrients application were small. The incidence of crown blight was spotty and not related to fertilizer treatment.