• Biochemical Studies of Rib Discoloration and Pink Rib of Lettuce

      Sharples, G. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Characteristics of Harvested Lettuce Heads

      Oebker, N. F.; Hariott, B. L.; Page, Carmy G.; Foerman, B. R.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A study was made of the characteristics of harvested lettuce heads in Arizona during the 1964-65 season. Information on size, weight, firmness and number of wrapper leaves of each head sampled was collected and set up for analysis. No results were available at the time of this progress report.
    • Effect of Fertilizers on Yield, Quality and Nutrient Uptake by Lettuce

      Strohlein, J. L.; Tucker, T. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A series of studies on lettuce fertilization have been carried out over the past few years. Fertilizer applications increased yield through increased head size and did not affect the number or quality of harvested heads. The lower rates used were as effective as the higher rates. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization generally increased the nitrate and phosphorus content of the various plant parts selected for analysis.
    • Lettuce Insect Control with Experimental Insecticide Compounds

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A number of chemical compounds have been field evaluated as potential pesticides for control of insects on lettuce over the past several years. The important pests of fall planted lettuce being the cabbage looper, beet armyworm and corn earworm. In addition to the chemical compounds, the disease organism Bacillus Thuringiensis was used. It is slower in acting, but can be quite effective, particularly against the cabbage looper. Some of the chemical compounds which have been evaluated and are now available commercially are Sevin, Dibrom and Bidrin. This evaluation will continue as new and possibly more effective materials are made available.
    • Lettuce Nutrition as Influenced by Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium and Magnesium Fertilization

      Stanersen, L. A.; Turner, Fred Jr. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Lettuce Packing Procedures

      Oebker, N. F.; Grounds, R. E.; Foerman, B. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Lettuce Variety Trials in Cochise County

      Oebker, N. F.; Page, C.; Foster, R. E.; Bessey, P. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Lettuce varieties were compared in Cochise County for late spring and early fall harvests. The Great Lakes 659 types consistently performed as well as any in the trials for these times of year in this area.
    • Mechanical Harvesting of Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Research work aimed at developing a selective mechanical harvester for crisphead lettuce was initiated in 1961. During the course of the project, two experimental machines were constructed. Commercial development of the harvester was assumed by Lockwood Grader Corporation in 1964 under terms of a contract between Lockwood and the Arizona Research Foundation. Lockwood is now in the process of constructing a four row prototype harvester that will be capable of harvesting 1.5 acres of lettuce per hour.
    • Precision Planting Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Compared to current planting practices using naked lettuce seed, precision planting coated lettuce seed can result in substantially reduced thinning costs, increases in number of marketable lettuce heads per acre, and higher average head weight. The use of coated seed, however, requires more attention to seedbed preparation, planting depths, irrigation schedules, and stand maintenance. Hill - dropping naked seed does not appear to offer advantages over conventional planting practices except in a slight reduction of seed cost per acre.
    • Sclerotiniose or Drop of Lettuce

      Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Preliminary tests have been initiated in a program for control of Sclerotiniose, or drop of lettuce. Damping-off problems are concurrently being investigated.