• Arizona Potato Variety Trials, 1961-1964

      Oebker, N. F.; Bessey, P. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      In potato variety trials in Central Arizona, Kennebec and Merrimack performed the best as potatoes for chipping. Red varieties Viking, LaRouge, and Red LaSoda yielded about the same as Red Pontiac, the standard for the area; however, Viking had much better appearance and uniformity than the other three reds.
    • Bacterial Soft-Rot of Vegetables

      Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A highly virulent bacterial isolate was obtained from Arizona vegetables. Pathogenicity and physiological studies were made in an effort to correctly identify the isolate.
    • Biochemical Studies of Rib Discoloration and Pink Rib of Lettuce

      Sharples, G. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Cantaloup Bed Shape Modification for Mechanical Harvest

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Current Arizona cultural practices for cantaloup are not compatable with mechanized harvesting equipment now being developed for cantaloup. Mechanical harvesters will require a uniformly sloped bed, preferably flat, at harvest time. Experiments thus far indicate that this condition can be met by reshaping the conventional bed after the plants have emerged.
    • Cantaloup Harvest Aids

      Larsen, W. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Characteristics of Harvested Lettuce Heads

      Oebker, N. F.; Hariott, B. L.; Page, Carmy G.; Foerman, B. R.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A study was made of the characteristics of harvested lettuce heads in Arizona during the 1964-65 season. Information on size, weight, firmness and number of wrapper leaves of each head sampled was collected and set up for analysis. No results were available at the time of this progress report.
    • Chili Pepper Variety Trials

      Oebker, N. F.; Page, Carmy G. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Results from pepper variety tests across the state indicate that New Mexico 6-4, Rio Grande 21 and Sandia A are desirable varieties to grow in Arizona. Which variety to select will depend on use, location and individual preferences. No variety in the tests was found suitable for growing for paprika.
    • Cucurbit Virus Investigations

      Nelson, Merritt R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Continuing studies on cucurbit viruses have reinforced previous conclusions that these diseases are the most important factors in cantaloup crown blight. Epidemiological studies of the several viruses concerned are concentrated on ascertaining the sources of virus for cantaloup infection and developing methods for the mathematical analysis of linear spread of virus. New methods of identification of the viruses are being developed through the use of serology. This involves biophysical studies of the viruses in the development of purification techniques. Purification viruses must be obtained before antisera can be developed.
    • Cucurbita Research

      Bemis, W. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Curly Top Resistant Tomato Variety Observations

      Oebker, N. F.; Davison, Arlen; Bears, John (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      The performances of four curly top resistant tomato varieties were observed in Arizona during the period 1961 to 1964. Owyhee showed resistance but produced small fruits. Breeding line No. 126 and its improved replacement VF 122, had field resistance, but VF 122 did not set fruit as well as other varieties under high temperature conditions. Payette appeared to be the most promising of the varieties tried. It showed better resistance than Owyhee and produced good yields of desirable fruit when staked and trained properly.
    • Economic Feasibility of Cantaloup Production in Navajo County, Arizona

      Underwood, Amos; Farrish, Raymond (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Economic Feasibility of Chili Production in Northern Arizona

      Farrish, Raymond O. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Effect of Fertilizers on Yield, Quality and Nutrient Uptake by Lettuce

      Strohlein, J. L.; Tucker, T. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      A series of studies on lettuce fertilization have been carried out over the past few years. Fertilizer applications increased yield through increased head size and did not affect the number or quality of harvested heads. The lower rates used were as effective as the higher rates. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization generally increased the nitrate and phosphorus content of the various plant parts selected for analysis.
    • Effects of Magnesium, Nitrogen, and Micronutrients on the Yield and Incidence of Crown Blight of Cantaloups in Yuma Area

      Turner, Fred Jr.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Yield differences resulting from magnesium, nitrogen, and micronutrients application were small. The incidence of crown blight was spotty and not related to fertilizer treatment.
    • Effects of Treatments on the Postharvest Senescence of Green Leaves

      Bessey, Paul M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Estimated Use of Plant Nutrients in Arizona, by Crops

      Pawson, W. W.; Stanberry, C. O.; Fuller, W. H.; Tucker, T. C.; Pew, W. D.; Hillman, J. S. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Fall Armyworm Control on Sweet Corn with Granular Insecticide

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Several seasons of work indicate that topical application of granular pesticides to the whorl of fall grown sweet corn will effectively control the fall armyworm. First application to be made when the corn is approximately 12 inches high, followed by one or two additional applications at intervals of one week. The following three materials: 5 percent Diazinon granular, 5 percent Zectran granular, and 2 percent Endrin granular are the most promising when applied at 20-30 pounds per acre.
    • Feasibility of Protectice Cropping (Plastic Greenhouse Production) in Central Arizona

      Foerman, B. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      After commercial production on a trial basis during a four-year period (1961-65), protective cropping of tomatoes and possibly a few other higher return vegetable crops shows a promising alternative enterprise for local production whosever risks are intensified. Better adapted varieties, disease control and market development are primary objectives to be overcome.
    • Fertilizer Placement in Potato Production

      Pew, W. D.; Park, J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      The importance of proper fertilizer placement has been demonstrated in recent greenhouse studies. Small, seemingly unimportant changes in fertilizer placement often in reality are very important. Specially constructed boxes with glass fronts were used to study root development as affected by fertilizer placement. Yields were significantly different one from another with the poorer ones resulting where fertilizers were placed too close to the seed piece. Yields ranging from 298 cwt, where the fertilizer was placed two inches to each side and level with the seed piece; up to 367 cwt where the fertilizer was placed four inches to each side and two inches below the seed piece. Root burning and speed of root regeneration represent the most important consideration to be reckoned within the proper placement of fertilizer.
    • Fertilizer Studies with Potatoes in the Queen Creek Area

      Turner, Fred Jr.; Pew, W. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      In a fertilizer study in the Queen Creek area, a strong response to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers was obtained. Potatoes did not respond to potassium when applied with nitrogen and phosphorus.