• Mechanical Harvesting of Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Research work aimed at developing a selective mechanical harvester for crisphead lettuce was initiated in 1961. During the course of the project, two experimental machines were constructed. Commercial development of the harvester was assumed by Lockwood Grader Corporation in 1964 under terms of a contract between Lockwood and the Arizona Research Foundation. Lockwood is now in the process of constructing a four row prototype harvester that will be capable of harvesting 1.5 acres of lettuce per hour.
    • Potato Fertilization

      Pew, W. D.; Park, J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Results from experiments with varying levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium have shown that the ratios of 1 - 2.5 - 0 to 1 - 3 - 0 produce the highest yields. While the ratio between nitrogen and phosphorus appears important, the water solubility of the phosphorus seems to be the most important factor in proper fertilization. Proper placement of the fertilizer as well as irrigation and other cultural practices are musts in potato production.
    • Potato Insect Control with Granular Systemic Insecticides

      Gerhardt, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Ten percent granular formulations of phorate and Di-Syston at 20 pounds per acre will effectively control psyllids, aphids and thrips on potatoes. Two years study varying the placement of granular systemic insecticides in the soil in relation to the seed piece has not produced any significant differences in the insect control. The yields from plots in which the granules were placed four inches to the side and two inches below the seed piece were greater. All were better than the untreated check. Of two new systemic insecticides applied as granules at planting time, the material US-21149 (Temik R) gave outstanding insect control and above average yields on Kennebec variety potatoes. Compound NIA-10242 gave less effective insect control and yields below UC-21149.
    • Potato Soft-Rot Diseases

      Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Investigations on the problem of black-leg and tuber rots have revealed an interaction between two pathogenic organisms, a bacterial species and Pythium aphanidermatum.
    • Precision Planting Lettuce

      Harriott, B. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Compared to current planting practices using naked lettuce seed, precision planting coated lettuce seed can result in substantially reduced thinning costs, increases in number of marketable lettuce heads per acre, and higher average head weight. The use of coated seed, however, requires more attention to seedbed preparation, planting depths, irrigation schedules, and stand maintenance. Hill - dropping naked seed does not appear to offer advantages over conventional planting practices except in a slight reduction of seed cost per acre.
    • Response of Dry Onions to Varying Levels of Soil Moisture

      Pew, W. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Onions respond favorably to increasing levels of soil moisture as measured by increase in bulb size and total yields. Maintaining a soil moisture level of 18-20 centibars of tension (nearly field-holding capacity) produces the greatest yields of bulbs. However, dry onions so produced are somewhat softer in texture, tended toward thick -neck growth, matured slower, and are more difficult to cure adequately in the normal length of time. Onions grown on lesser amounts of water tend to have the reverse characteristics. Costs of production are similarly increased under high soil moisture levels because of the need for replacing nitrogen leached out of the root zone. Also, the costs of the water and its application must be increased. Therefore, the economics involved would be a required consideration.
    • Sclerotiniose or Drop of Lettuce

      Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Preliminary tests have been initiated in a program for control of Sclerotiniose, or drop of lettuce. Damping-off problems are concurrently being investigated.
    • Studies on Fall Production Problems with Irish Potatoes in Arizona

      Bessey, Paul M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Teaching Program in Vegetable Crops

      Fazio, Steve (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Vegetable Crops Extension Program

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08
    • Vegetable Growers Association Memorial Scholarships

      Fazio, Steve (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
    • Verticillium Wilt of Potato

      Stone, William J. H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Isolates of Verticillium Albo-atrum were obtained from potato and from cotton. Investigations are in process to ascertain the relationship between cotton Verticillium wilt and potato Verticillium wilt and to determine the significance of the disease to Arizona potato production.
    • Yuma Sweet Corn Variety Trials

      Oebker, N. F.; Grounds, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-08)
      Eighteen sweet corn hybrids were compared in the Yuma Valley in the spring of 1961. Golden Cross Bantam, especially the 51-T strain, gave the best overall performance.