• Transplant Nutrient Conditioning Hastens Broccoli Maturity

      McGrady, J. J.; Tilt, P. A.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Broccoli Downy Mildew Trials

      Butler, M. D.; Davis, J. A.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Transplant Nutrient Conditioning Improves Cauliflower Early Yield

      McGrady, J. J.; Tilt, P. A.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Salt Tolerance of Tepary, Navy and Backcross Beans as Expressed by Yields Over Several Seasons

      Podziewski, J.; Coons, J.; Goertz, S.; Pratt, R.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • 1987 Cauliflower Variety Trials

      Butler, M. D.; Oebker, N. F.; Davis, J. A.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Onion Variety by Date of Planting Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1987

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Thatcher, L. M.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Twenty onion varieties were planted on two different dates in March at the Safford Agricultural Center. Yields up to 780 50-pound sacks per acre were harvested, with the early planting generally yielding slightly more than the later planting. The earlier planting generally had more jumbo and large onions and fewer medium and small onions than the later planting. The highest yielding onions were yellow varieties compared to the two white and one red varieties, but premiums for the non-yellow onions at harvest compensated for the lower yields. Three intermediate-day onions were included in the test; they were out-yielded by many of the long-day varieties at both planting dates. Spring - planted, long-day onions can be successfully grown in the Safford valley with yields that are economically feasible.
    • Effect of Salinity on Yield of Two Varieties of Tomatoes

      Al-Rawahy, Salem; Stroehlein, J. L.; Clark, L. J.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Two varieties of tomatoes were grown with two water qualities and three N rates at Safford in 1987. Results indicate that adapted varieties may be suitable for commercial production in the upper Gila Valley.
    • Interactions of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Water Rates on Sweet Corn Growth, Yield and Quality

      Stroehlein, J. L.; Tucker, T. C.; Doerge, T. A.; Fangmeier, D. D.; Oebker, N. F.; McCreary, T. W.; Lakatos, E. A.; Husman, S. H.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Oriental Vegetable Cultivar Trials

      McGrady, J.; Oebker, N.; Tilt, P.; Nelson, J.; Butler, M.; White, M.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Carrot Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1987

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Thatcher, L. M.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Four carrot varieties were tested at the Safford Agricultural Center in response to local growers needs. Yields in excess of 15 tons per acre were achieved which, when coupled with the harvest price, would have yielded a gross per acre income larger than $3,000.
    • Hybrid Onion Seed Trial, 1987

      Hagler, J. R.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Successful seed production of open pollinated onion (Allium cepa L.) is difficult in Arizona. Providing adequate pollen transfer by honey bees (Apis mellifera) to ensure adequate seed set is a problem often encountered. Honey bees discriminate between onion cultivars. Onion flowers appear to be less attractive to honey bees than flowers of most competing plants. Bees may neglect the crop, particularly if another highly attractive plant species is in bloom. This honey bee discrimination has led to poor onion seed yields. This report compares seed production among five onion cultivars in Tucson, Arizona.
    • Herbicide Trial on Bok Choy and Napa

      Butler, M. D.; Howell, D. R.; Tickes, B. R.; Heathman, E. S.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Differences in Weight of 'Calsweet' Watermelons at Three Irrigation Levels

      Livingston, M. S.; Ray, D. T.; Garrot, D. J.; Fangmeier, D. D.; Hussman, S.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Calsweet' watermelons were irrigated at three levels using a drip irrigation system. Number and weight of melons were recorded for three harvest dates. The low water treatment had significantly lower average melon weight than the medium and high treatments. There were no significant differences between the number of melons produced for each treatment.
    • Stress Induced Leakage of Sugars as an Estimator of Sweet Corn (Zea Mays) Seed Vigor

      Lehle, F. R.; Oebker, N. F.; White, M.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      The seed vigor of a super-sweet mutant of sweet corn (Sweetie 76) was compared to that of a traditional, non-mutant variety (Jubilee). The inherent seed vigor of a typical super-sweet corn mutant was considerably less than that of a traditional non-mutant variety. Leakage of reducing sugars from sweet corn seeds at a low temperature was not correlated with seed vigor.
    • Techniques for Separating Tetraploid and Triploid Watermelon Seed and Effects of Some Priming Treatments on Germinaiton

      Loehrlein, M. M.; Ray, D. T.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      Seeds of the commercial cultivar for seedless watermelons, TriX313, were separated into groups based on thickness in one experiment and on weight in another. Number of triploids and tetraploids were recorded for each category. There were no significant differences in ploidy levels based on either weight or seed thickness. Seeds from this same cultivar were treated with priming solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG 8000), KNO3, and distilled water for three lengths of time (1,3, or 6 days). The seed was subsequently air-dried for 1 or 7 days and then tested for germination and emergence.
    • Thermodormancy of Several Lettuce Cultivars in Laboratory vs. Field Conditions

      Coons, J.; McGrady, J.; Simons, N.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Aphicide Trial on Cabbage

      Butler, M. D.; Hannon, T. A.; Howell, D. R.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Peanut Variety Demonstration, Safford Agricultural Center

      Clark, L. J.; Thatcher, L. M.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
    • Transmission, Host Range and Virus-Vector Relationships of Chino del Tomate Virus (CdTV), a New Whitefly-transmitted Geminivirus of Tomato

      Brown, J. K.; Nelson, M. R.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)
      The transmission properties, host range, and virus- vector relationships of chino del tomate virus (CdTV), a new whitefly-transmitted geminivirus of tomato, are described. The virus is transmitted by B. tabaci, the sweet potato whitefly, but not by seed or sap. The virus infects members of the Asclepiadaceae, Leguminosae, Malvaceae, and Solanaceae. In virus-vector studies, minimum AAF and IAF times were 1 hour and 2 hours, respectively. The virus was retained by its whitefly vector for 4.5 and 7.3 days following 24- and 72-hr AAF respectively. Relative efficiencies of transmission for 1, 5, 10 and 20 B. tabaci were 15, 49, 84 and 100 percent, respectively. The chino del tomate (CdT), or leaf curl disease of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), was first reported in cultivated tomato fields in Sinaloa, Mexico in 1970-71 (4). Presently, it occurs in tomato production areas of the west coast of Sinaloa and may affect 100 percent of the plants in a field (1). The disease is characterized by curled and rolled leaves, thickened veins, a bright-to-subdued-yellow mosaic which varies with time of the year, stunting, and a reduced fruit set (1,3). Recently, a whitefly -transmitted geminivirus, CdT virus (CdTV), was implicated as the causal agent of the disease (1,3), but information concerning the biological nature of the virus is lacking. Here, we present the results of studies involving virus transmission, experimental host range, and virus -vector relationships.
    • 1987 Broccoli Variety Trials

      Butler, M. D.; Oebker, N. F.; Davis, J. A.; Oebker, Norman F.; Kingdon, Lorraine B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988-05)