• Response of Micro-Sprinkler Irrigated ‘Lisbon’ lemons to N Rate and Source on a Superstition Sand

      Sanchez, C. A.; Peralta, M.; Wright, Glenn (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      Much of the citrus produced in southwestern Arizona is grown on sandy soils. Because these soils have a low ion exchange capacity, are highly permeable to water, and are prone to nitrate leaching, achieving efficient N management presents a continuing challenge. Studies were conducted during 1999, 2000, and 2001 to evaluate the response of micro-sprinkler irrigated lemons to N rate (0, 1.8, and 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1) and N source (UN32, CAN-17, CN9, and mixed program) on Superstition Sand. Lemon yield increased by N rate during the first and second harvests in 1999, 2000, and 2001. In 1999, yields increased linearly to 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1 but in 2000 and 2001 yields were maximized at 1.8 kg N tree-1 yr-1. In 1999 where larger increments of N were applied over a smaller time period relative to the other seasons, UN32 seemed to decrease yields at the highest N rate. There were no significant effects to N source in 2000 and 2001.
    • Results of New Cultivar Selection Trials for Lemon in Arizona - 2002

      Wright, Glenn C.; Peña, Marco A.; Wright, Glenn; Department of Plant Sciences, U. of A.; Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      Three lemon cultivar selection trials are being conducted at the Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center in Somerton, AZ. Data from these trials suggest that ‘Limonero Fino 49’ selections may be a suitable alternative for the varieties most commonly planted in Southwest Arizona today. ‘Cavers Lisbon’ and ‘Villafranca’ might also be planted on an experimental basis
    • Results of New Cultivar Selection Trials for Orange in Arizona - 2003

      Wright, Glenn C.; Peña, Marco A.; Wright, Glenn; Department of Plant Sciences, U. of A.; Yuma Mesa Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
      Three orange cultivar trials have been established in Arizona, one at the Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ and one at the Citrus Agriculture Center, Waddell, AZ. For the navel orange trial in Yuma, ‘Fisher’ navel continues to have the greatest yield, but is unacceptably granulated For the Waddell trial, the second year data has been collected, and suggests that ‘Fisher’ and ‘Beck- Earli’ are outperforming the other cultivars tested to date.