• Branch Induction with Cytokinin to Improve Appearance and Increase Cutting Production of Jojoba

      Ravetta, D.; Palzkill, D. A.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Treatment of jojoba plants with foliar sprays of benzyladenine (BA) alone, or in combination with gibberellin(4+7) (GA(4+7)) fatly increased branching frequency compared to untreated control plants and to plants from which all shoot tips were removed (pinched). Use of BA by itself resulted in an adverse reduction in intemode elongation. This was overcome in treatments which included GA(4+7) Use of GA(4+7) by itself resulted in reduced branching and abnormal shoot elongation. Pruning (pinching) of all shoot tips resulted in a slight increase in branching over untreated plants, but it had much less effect on branching than did treatments with BA. Results were very similar on two different clones tested.
    • Determining Optimum Length of Bulb Cold Storage for Oriental Hybrid Lilies in Arizona

      Miller, W. B.; Bailey, D. A.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Bulbs of three varieties of oriental hybrid lilies were stored at 4 °C for 6 to 12 weeks prior to greenhouse forcing at 18 °C night temperature. Increasing duration of storage reduced the number of days to shoot emergence, visible flower buck and anthesis for each variety. The number of days from planting to anthesis ranged from 70 to 102 and varied with cultivar and storage duration. Increasing durations of storage had no commercially significant effect on the number of flowers reaching anthesis, number of leaves or aborted flower buds. The varieties used in this study flower earlier than commercially established cultivars and may be successfully forced in Arizona for early spring holidays.
    • Evaluation of Cold Storage for Unrooted Jojoba Cuttings

      Palzkill, D. A.; El-Serafy, M.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Jojoba stem tip cuttings were stored under refrigerated conditions of 34° and 42°F for up to 2 months with no loss in rooting potential. Rooting percent for cuttings of two clones which were rooted with no prior storage was 64.8%. Rooting after 7, 14, 28 and 56 days of storage was 81.7, 72.9, 71.7 and 81.2 %, respectively.
    • Identification of the Phloem Translocated Carbohydrate in Idria columnaris (Boojum tree)

      Miller, W. B.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Sucrose was identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the only phloem-mobile carbohydrate in the Boojum tree. This result has implications for carbohydrate metabolism in the desert adapted Boojum and ocotillo, as discussed below.
    • Localization of Reserve Remobilization During Scalet Formation on Lilium longiflorum Scales

      Miller, W. B.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      When Lilium longiflorum bulb scales we removed and placed in a moist environment, new bulbs ("scalets") arise from the base of the original scale, providing a practical means of clonal propagation. To determine which region of the scale is responsible for the early development of the new scalet, investigations were conducted on the localization of stanch hydrolysis and accumulation of soluble sugars in basal distal and central regions. Over a six week period starch concentration decreases initially in the distal regions, followed by the central region. Soluble sugars increased in distal areas over this same time period These findings indicate the distal regions of a lily scale are important in the early development of the new scalet, in contrast to the adjacen4 basal region.