• Underutilized Native Woody Legumes for Landscape Use

      Johnson, M. B.; Palzkill, D. A.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
    • Correcting Iron Chlorosis in Pyracantha

      Doerge, T. A.; Gibson, R.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      The alkaline nature of most Arizona soils contributes to widespread iron deficiency in exotic ornamental plants, such as pyracantha. An experiment was conducted in 1987 to evaluate the effectiveness of two soil-applied iron fertilizers (FeEDDHA chelate and a jarosite-type iron silicate, Ironite\) and three rates of foliar- applied FeEDDHA in controlling iron chlorosis symptoms in established pyracantha vines. Soil-applied FeEDDHA was the most effective in reducing iron chlorosis symptoms, followed by the foliar chelate treatments. The iron silicate material had no significant effect on iron chloroses symptoms compared to the untreated control. Both soil and foliar applications of FeEDDHA chelate made in the fall can effectively control iron chlorosis symptoms in established pyracantha.
    • 1988 Tall Fescue Variety Trial

      Mancino, C. F.; Kopec, D. M.; Salo, L.; Bermudez, R.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
    • Localization of Reserve Remobilization During Scalet Formation on Lilium longiflorum Scales

      Miller, W. B.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      When Lilium longiflorum bulb scales we removed and placed in a moist environment, new bulbs ("scalets") arise from the base of the original scale, providing a practical means of clonal propagation. To determine which region of the scale is responsible for the early development of the new scalet, investigations were conducted on the localization of stanch hydrolysis and accumulation of soluble sugars in basal distal and central regions. Over a six week period starch concentration decreases initially in the distal regions, followed by the central region. Soluble sugars increased in distal areas over this same time period These findings indicate the distal regions of a lily scale are important in the early development of the new scalet, in contrast to the adjacen4 basal region.
    • Spray Carrier Volume and Irrigation Method Effects on XE-1019 Efficacy on Poinsettias

      Bailey, D. A.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Plants of Euphorbia pulchenima Wind. 'Gutbier V-14 Glory Annette Hegg Dark Red', and 'Annette Hegg Brilliant Diamond' were treated with 37 iw a.i. of XE-1019 applied in 102, 204, or 408 ml-m⁻² foliar sprays. Half of the plants received overhead irrigation and the remaining received soil-surface irrigations. No spray carrier volume effect or irrigation effect was observed for final plant height, bract canopy diameter, or for days from start of short days to bloom. The results obtained do not support the hypothesis that spray carrier volume or irrigation method affect the efficacy of XE-1019 on poinsettias.
    • Estimating Turfgrass Water Use with AZMET

      Brown, P.; Kopec, D.; Mancino, C.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      The Arizona Meteorological Network provides weather-based estimates of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) for much of southern, central and western Arizona. A simple 3-step procedure to convert ETo data into reliable estimates of turfgrass water use is described The procedure requires that AZMET ETo values be multiplied by a correction factor known as a crop coefficient (Kc). The selection of the Kc depends on the type and height of the turfgrass as well as desired turf quality. The procedure is well adapted for use on computers.
    • Ryegrass Overseed Trials for 1986-1987

      Kopec, D. M.; Mancino, C. F.; Terrey, A.; Gomperts, S.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1988)
      Ryegrass cultivars, experimental accessions, blends and composite mixtures were tested for overall adaptation to overseeded turfgrass management practices under desert conditions. Entries were significantly different from each other for color and overall turfgrass quality. Gennplasm for overseeding differs for tolerance to close mowing under desert conditions. In most cases, the better adapted entries had superior scores in two years of testing.