• Fairway Overseed Turfgrass Trials, 1996-1997 Season

      Kopec, David M.; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Kerr, Darren E.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Twenty-three overseed entries (and a non-overseed check) were evaluated from November 1996 to June 1997 for turf performance over Tifgreen (328) bermudagrass. Entries varied for turfgrass establishment, color, quality, density, texture and uniformity on all evaluation dates. One annual ryegrass and three intermediate ryegrass Lolium hybridium entries were included. The intermediate type 'Hybrid X-NC' had better performance than 'Froghair' or 'Hybredium' intermediate hybrids in most cases, except for early transition. Entries which consistently had the darkest green genetic color included 'Citation III', 'LPQ-N3', 'EP-20', 'Charger II', '84-91', 'WX-140', and 'Roadrunner'. Entries which consistently ranked high in overall turfgrass performance included 'Citation III', '2-DLM', '84-91', 'Roadrunner', 'Charger II', 'WX-140', '93-7', and 'LPQ-N3'.
    • Field Performance of Selected Mowed Distichlis Clones, USGA Research Report #1

      Kopec, David M.; Marcum, Kenneth P.; Hughes, Harrison; Christiansen, Dana; Koski, Anthony; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Twenty-one clonal selections of saltgrass (Distichlis) were evaluated in March and May for initial green-up, plot growth, unmowed canopy height, number of satellite plants emerging from rhizomes and floral expression. Accessions were statistically different for all variables measured. Colorado’s accessions (5 of 7) were upright in growth habit and had the greatest number of satellite plants at the surface in March. These plants also had the greatest percent plot coverage. Arizona’s accessions had lower growth in height, were more compact in growth and were less sprawling. However, their plot coverage (grow-in) was not as great as the upright, rapid growing Colorado accessions. Of the twenty-one clones included, thirteen are males and eight are females, with expression ranging from 1 to more than 200 flowering culms per plot.
    • Field Performance of Selected Mowed Distichlis Clones, USGA Research Report #2

      Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Twenty-one clonal selections of saltgrass (Distichlis spp.) were evaluated during the first full summer growing season (May - October 1999) for turf characteristics and general adaptation. Initial percent plot cover in May ranged from 8% to 42% among clonal accessions. Accessions which produced the highest unmowed canopy heights had the greatest initial cover in May. This trend reversed itself by August and September whereby entries which exhibited less elevated foliage tended to produce turfs which had higher shoot densities, greater percent plot cover, visual estimates of density and more acceptable overall turfgrass quality under accumulated mowing pressure. The "treatment" (clonal accession) affect was significant on all dates for all field variables demonstrating clearly that differences exist for growth parameters of Distichlis screened under mowing stress.
    • Field Performance of Selected Mowed Distichlis Clones, USGA Research Report #3

      Kopec, David M.; Adams, Alan; Bourn, Chris; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Marcum, Kenneth P.; Pessarakli, Mohammed; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Twenty-one clonal (genotype) accessions of Distichlis are being continually evaluated for field performance as replicated mowed turf plots under desert conditions. The genotype ("treatment") affect was significant for most field variables measured, or assigned to plots using visual rating scales customary for turf evaluations. Genotype differences occurred for percent plot composition color, quality, texture, uniformity and leaf width. Visual stress (prolonged hot weather without irrigation) and leaf hair presence were not significant responses between accessions. Long term mowing stress shows divergent performance amount Distichlis germplasm for growth characters and turf persistence under mowed conditions.
    • Field Performance of Selected Mowed Distichlis Clones, USGA Research Report #4

      Kopec, David M.; Adams, Alan; Bourn, Chris; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Marcum, Kenneth P.; Pessarakli, Mohammed; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Clonal accessions (genotype selections) of Distichlis continue to show divergent responses for turf-type growth habit and general turf-type adaptation under field mowing stress. The treatment (clonal accession) affect was significant for all field response variables from mid July to mid August (data collections for Report #4, except for "percent plot straw" on October 12. In July 2000, mean percent plot green cover ranged from 47% to 96% among clonal accessions. Turfgrass quality in July was best among the entries A138, A86, A137, A48, A51, and A40. These entries had the greatest percent plot cover, moderately fine leaf texture, and high shoot density, compared to other entries. In the calendar year 2000, (includes weather conditions in Report #3), the test site was exposed to atmospheric conditions which included a reference ET. of 3.59" (January); 4.42" (February); 6.23" (March); 8.96" (April); 11.32" (May); 9.08" (June); 9.31" (July); 7.53" (August); 7.37" (September); 3.55" (October). The test was subjected to severe drought conditions throughout the test, starting April 2000. Rainfall from January too, and including April was 1.28 inches. There was no rain from May 1 to June 15. Four rains from July 17 to July 30 added 2.94 inches of rainfall, with two thirds of this occurring from one storm on July 29. No irrigation was added from July 1, until September 15. During that time period, 3.26 inches of rain fell in July. In August, 2.47" of rainfall occurred. From June 1 to September 15, the accumulated reference ET. was 29.68 inches. Total rainfall was 5.81" (no irrigation practiced). Most (but not all) Distichlis accessions maintained adequate turf color and percent plot green, up to late August. Visual stress ratings in early August showed differences in visual stress ratings and leaf canopy temperatures measured with a hand held IRT device. Entries A48, A51, A40, A138, A61, and C10 exhibited the least amount of visible drought stress in early August. Accessions that had the highest overall quality ratings in July were A138, A86, A137, A48, A51, and A40. Accessions that exhibited acceptable (highest) turf quality prior to and during the drought period included A138, A40, and A51. Drought induced dormancy finally occurred at the beginning of September, as most accessions drastically decreased the amount of green plot foliage after a prolonged period without irrigation. After flood irrigation and fertilizer applications on September 15 and September 29, plots recovered by mid October. The recovery was not full, as the greatest amount of green percent plot cover ranged from 23% to 83% among entries. Entries with the greatest amount of green cover after the post dormancy period included, A65, A138, A137, A77, and A72. All entries did exhibit reduced quality in comparison to July ratings. Based on these results, Distichlis should be irrigated once/month in a desert condition to avoid drought induced dormancy. During the calendar year 2000, accessions which had notable performance included: Early Spring Green Up: C8, A77, A138, A86; Early Summer Quality (non-water stress in May, and water stressed in June): A55, A86, A51, and A40, A138; Mid Summer Quality: A48, A86, A137, A51, A138; During Drought Quality: A138, A40, A51; Post Dormancy Quality: A65, A138, A137, A77, A72.
    • Overseed Greens Trial 1997-1998

      Kopec, David M.; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Perennial ryegrass germplasm was quicker to establish plot cover on a "Tifgreen" bermudagrass green than that of Poa trivialis when used alone. Poa trivialis alone produced lighter color turfs when compared to perennial ryegrass. Turfgrass color was generally uniform in appearance, however, within each entry. Therefore, color as a selection criteria is a matter of choice by the user. The turfgrass mixture "Catalina/Winterplay" (80% perennial ryegrass/20% Poa trivialis) was intermediate in turfgrass color. "Brightstar II" PR generally produced a dark turf throughout the growing season. For overall turfgrass quality, the perennial ryegrasses generally out performed the Poa trivialis germplasm. The mixture of "Catalina/Winterplay" produced a very dense turf, followed closely by "Turfstar Plus" PR, "95-1" PR and "PT-4" PT. ASnowbird@ PT had the least amount of living ground cover by May 31, which is desirable from a transition standpoint.
    • Overseeding Fairway Trials

      Kopec, David M.; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      Fifty-one overseed entries were evaluated in 1997-1998 for turfgrass performance. New experimental accessions of perennial ryegrass were darker in color than most of the commercially available germplasm included in this test. Ryegrass germplasm had better turfgrass quality after April, than did mixtures of perennial ryegrass with Poa trivialis, which performed well in December, January and March. General appearance for total plot leaf texture was best generally among the Poa trivialis containing mixtures. Hybrid (or intermediate) ryegrasses (L. which are crosses between perennial X annual ryegrass, are generally closer to annual ryegrass in performance. There was a vast improvement in L. hybridum (Pick YNC) when compared to annual ryegrass alone for turf performance. Intermediate and annual ryegrasses did show signs of decline in June (more so than ryegrass or Poa trivialis blends), which was desirable from a transition standpoint.
    • Ryegrass Germplasm Overseeding Trials

      Kopec, David M.; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.; Jensen, David M.; Kopec, David M. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-09)
      A field test was conducted to evaluate the turf performance of improved hybrid ryegrass (sometimes called intermediate ryegrass) Lolium hybridum versus that of perennial ryegrass germplasm (Lolium perenne) for winter overseeding purposes. "Gulf" annual ryegrass was also evaluated for comparison purposes. On all evaluation dates, the treatment effect was significant for all visual response variables measured (quality, color, texture, density, etc.). The mixture of LHRT hybrid ryegrass/Poa trivialis established quicker than other treatments during the first month (November). Perennial ryegrass entries provided the darkest color turf. Among hybrid ryegrasses, Pick A-97 was slightly darker in turf color when compared to LHRT. LHRT alone was darker in color than when mixed with Poa trivialis. In terms of overall turf quality, Pick A-97 and LHRT hybrid ryegrasses were essentially equal in performance. The spring decline was greater among hybrid ryegrasses than that of perennial ryegrass. Both hybrid ryegrasses (A-97 and LHRT) were superior to annual ryegrasses in all aspects of turf performance. By mid-June of 1999, Pick A-97 had more bermudagrass present (52%) than LHRT (28%). LHRT had more straw-colored (dead transition grass) than A-97 as well. By early July, A-97 and LHRT had 72% and 62% bermudagrass, respectively, and essentially the same amount of overseed present (20-23%). LHRT had 15% plot straw at this time, while A-97 had 8%. Among perennial ryegrasses, Sunshine had the slowest transition (42%), followed by Jiffie (50%) and Future 2500 (71%) by early July. The addition of Poa trivialis to LHRT hybrid ryegrass increased overall quality of the LHRT alone, but slowed transition slightly, most likely due to increased canopy densities achieved by the addition of Poa trivialis. This test demonstrated that the hybrid ryegrass germplasm tested here provided adequate fairway turf performance, and that transition among and between Lolium germplasm is variable, and genetically dependant.