• The Effects of Burstᴿ on DPL-61

      Hofmann, W. C.; Else, P. T. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      An experiment was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Experiment Center to evaluate Burstᴿ, a cytokinin based plant growth regulator, on the growth, development and productivity of DPL-61. Six treatments were included in the experiment which varied application timing and frequency. No significant differences in yield were observed.
    • An Evaluation of the BioHumaNeticsᴿ Plant Growth Substance

      Hofmann, W. C.; Else, P. T. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Plant growth substances and fertilizers from BioHumaNeticsᴿ were evaluated under field conditions on DPL 61 at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1985. Treatments included: 1)standard fertilization recommended for the farm, 2)no added fertilizers and 3)a treatment schedule prescribed by BioHumaNetics. No statistically significant differences were detected.
    • Effects of PIX and PREP on Short Staple Cotton, Bonita, Graham County

      Haas, Bob; Haas, Randy; Haas, Paul; Cluff, Ron; Clark, Lee J.; Cramer, Gary; Haas, Ted (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Four different treatments of PIX were evaluated with and without PREP on short staple cotton on two locations in the southern part of Graham county above the 4000 foot level. PIX caused significant decreases in plant height. The effect of the PIX treatments on yield, even though not significant, varied with the robustness of the cotton plants. PREP caused significant increases in maturity with no changes in yield on both locations.
    • The Eveonomics of Linear-Move Irrigation: Preliminary Results

      Roupal, R. H.; Wilson, P. N.; Hart, W. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Yield of 12 Upland Cotton Varieties Planted at 5 Dates at Marana in 1985

      Kittock, David L.; Hofmann, Wallace C.; Else, Peter T.; Malcuit, Joel; Michaud, Carl (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Lint yield from planting on 2 April averaged 406 pounds of lint/acre less than from the 23 April planting for the 12 varieties. After 23 April, lint yield decreased an average of 6 pounds of lint/day to 7 May. For the 7 May to 20 May period the daily decrease was 10 pounds/day and from 20 May to 7 June it was 23 pounds/day. Deltapine (DP) 775, DP 90, and DP 90Y had the highest lint yield for the first two plantings and the lowest lint yield for the last planting. Centennial, in contrast, had the lowest yield for the first three planting dates and the highest yield for the last planting date. This illustrates the importance of selecting a variety that is best adapted for the particular planting period.
    • Effect of CO₂ on Cotton Yile and Water Use

      Kimball, B. A.; Mauney, J. R.; Nakayama, F. S.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Seed cotton yields were increased an average 80% by a near doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration (approximately 650 ppm) in 3 years of experiments using CO₂-enriched, open-top chambers on field-grown cotton. Water use was not changed much or in a consistent direction, so water use efficiency increased in step with the dramatic yield increase.
    • Fifty-Two Chromosome Caducous Bract Cotton

      Muramoto, H.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Caducous bract (bracts which fall before the bolls open) tetra-ploid cottons with 52 chromosomes were developed after many years of hybridization and selection. Since the bracts shed, and are not present when the bolls open and the cottons harvested, it would mean cleaner cotton that would be an economic benefit to the farmers. It would also prevent textile mill workers from being exposed to the cotton dust of bract origin.
    • Regional Variety Test

      Fisher, W. D.; Pegelow, E. J.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • F₂ Genetic Tests for the Associations of Monosomes and Telosomes with Marker Genes, 1985

      Endrizzi, J. E.; Sherman, R.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Effects of the Experimental Plant Regulator XE-1019 on Cotton

      Briggs, R. E.; Ledbetter, C. A.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      The experimental plant regulator XE-1019, a product of Chevron Chemical Company, was applied to short staple cotton at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center in 1985. Plant height was modified by the chemical due to greatly shortened internode length. The 1.0 lb. a.i. XE-1019 per acre rate applied before bloom yielded significantly less than the other treatments at final harvest. Data collected from eight harvests through the season from sub-plots resulted in significant yield differences from the second through the sixth harvest dates.
    • Harvesting Progress in 1985

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Response of Surface Drip Irrigated Cotton to Water Levels, Varieties and Plant Populations

      Hofmann, W. C.; Stroehlein, J. L.; Taylor, B. B.; Michaud, C.; Else, P. T. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      A drip irrigation trial was conducted at Eloy, Arizona to investigate optimal irrigation levels for cotton. Five irrigation levels (23.6, 26.7, 29.9, 32.8 and 33.8 acre inches) were applied to DPL 41, DPL 90 and DPL 774. The varieties were planted at 5, 10, and 20 pounds/acre. There were no statistical differences in yield in the 3 wetter irrigation treatments. Both of the drier water levels produced significantly lower yields. Significant differences were also detected in the response of the varieties and populations.
    • Steron-Inhibiting Fungicides to Control Southwestern Rust of Cotton

      Young, Deborah J.; Sullivan, L. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      The use of sterol-inhibiting fungicides significantly decreased the number of aecial pustules on cotton leaves. The use of these fungicides did not significantly increase seed cotton yields when compared to check plots nor when compared to plots where a conventional, protective fungicide was used.
    • Nitrogen and Water Effects in Drip Irrigated Cotton

      Tucker, T. C.; Fangmeier, D. D.; Husman, S.; Stroehlein, J. L.; Doerge, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Nitrogen at five rates and water at three levels (0.6, 1.0, and 1.3 CU) were studied in a buried drip irrigation system on a Casa Grande sandy loam soil at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1985. Yield was increased by N at 50 lbs/Ac on the 1.0 and 1.3 CU water levels but not at the 0.6 CU water treatment. Yields were higher with increasing water application, 28.6" < 40.4" < 48.9". Soil nitrate-N was lower in 1985 than 1984 resulting in a greater fruiting and yield response to applied N fertilizer.
    • Effects of Temperature on Floral Inititiation and Production of 4-Bract Squares by DPL-90

      Mauney, Jack R.; Western Cotton Research Lab (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      When DPL-90 was exposed to average daily temperatures above 78 °F, the plants were delayed in the location of the first fruiting branch and produced squares which had 4-bracts. At temperatures below 78 °F, there were very few 4-bract squares produced.
    • Early Postemergence Control of Purple Nutsedge in Cototn Moore Farms, Waddell

      Heathman, Stanley; Chernicky, Jon; Farr, Charles (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Fruit Set Response of Cotton Varity DP-90 to Early Season Insecticide Application

      Barstow, Ben (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Nodes to first square and number of fruit in early fruiting positions were evaluated in Pinal County early season insecticide trials. Acephate treatments increased the number of fruit in early fruiting positions at three of four locations. Two of these same locations also received sidedressed aldicarb applications, but no significant response to aldicarb was observed.
    • Is Laser Leveling for Cotton Production Profitable?

      Ayer, Harry W.; Wright, N. Gene (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • A Presence/Absence Sampling Plan for Pink Bollworm Eggs in Cotton

      Hutchinson, W. D.; Henneberry, T. J.; Martin, J. M.; Beasley, C. A.; Western Cotton Research Lab; University of California (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      A new monitoring approach for the pink bollworm (PBW) was developed where only the presence or absence of one or more viable eggs/boll must be determined. Since individual eggs do not have to be counted, an experienced checker can examine a 25-boll sample in approximately 12 minutes. To use egg sampling for making treatment decisions, it is recommended that 3 to 4 25 -boll samples be taken per field.
    • Publications

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)