• Publications

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03
    • Cotton Variety Observation, Safford Agricultural Center

      Clark, Lee J.; Thatcher, L. Max (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Pima Cotton Breeding and Genetics

      Turcotte, E. L.; Percy, R. G.; Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      In the 1985 Pima Regional Tests, no strain yielded significantly above Pima S-6 at individual test sites. An official release was made for okra-leaf shape, frego bract shape, glandless plant and seed, nectariless, and male-fertility restoration noncommercial germplasm lines of Pima cotton. These germplasm lines incorporating genetic traits with potential economic value may be especially useful in developing parental material for hybrid cotton.
    • Seedling Emergence and Lint Yield of DP-90 Seed of Different Densities

      Hofmann, W. C.; Kittock, D. L.; Malcuit, J.; Else, P.; Michaud, C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Six lots of Deltapine (DP) 90 of different seed densities were planted at three planting rates in four tests in Arizona in 1985. The lowest density seed lot had significantly lower standard germination, cold test germination, field emergence, and lint yield than other seed lots. The highest density seed lot had slightly higher lint yield and field emergence than other lots on an average.
    • Effect of CO₂ on Cotton Yile and Water Use

      Kimball, B. A.; Mauney, J. R.; Nakayama, F. S.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory; Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Seed cotton yields were increased an average 80% by a near doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration (approximately 650 ppm) in 3 years of experiments using CO₂-enriched, open-top chambers on field-grown cotton. Water use was not changed much or in a consistent direction, so water use efficiency increased in step with the dramatic yield increase.
    • Yield of 12 Upland Cotton Varieties Planted at 5 Dates at Marana in 1985

      Kittock, David L.; Hofmann, Wallace C.; Else, Peter T.; Malcuit, Joel; Michaud, Carl (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Lint yield from planting on 2 April averaged 406 pounds of lint/acre less than from the 23 April planting for the 12 varieties. After 23 April, lint yield decreased an average of 6 pounds of lint/day to 7 May. For the 7 May to 20 May period the daily decrease was 10 pounds/day and from 20 May to 7 June it was 23 pounds/day. Deltapine (DP) 775, DP 90, and DP 90Y had the highest lint yield for the first two plantings and the lowest lint yield for the last planting. Centennial, in contrast, had the lowest yield for the first three planting dates and the highest yield for the last planting date. This illustrates the importance of selecting a variety that is best adapted for the particular planting period.
    • Is Laser Leveling for Cotton Production Profitable?

      Ayer, Harry W.; Wright, N. Gene (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • The Eveonomics of Linear-Move Irrigation: Preliminary Results

      Roupal, R. H.; Wilson, P. N.; Hart, W. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Cytogenetic Analysis of Lf Marker Gene and Monotelodisome 12L

      Endrizzi, J. E.; Sherman, R.; Department of Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Early Postemergence Control of Purple Nutsedge in Cototn Moore Farms, Waddell

      Heathman, Stanley; Chernicky, Jon; Farr, Charles (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • PIX Use Under Different Drip Irrigation Regimes

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      PIX application on June 24 to high flowering rate cotton suppressed growth to an average .3 inch per day compared to .85 inch for untreated cotton during the period from July 2 to July 15. Treatment of DPL 90 cotton with a flowering rate of 5 flowers per 25 feet of row held growth to .38 inch per day versus 25 flowers per 25 feet of row also increased small boll numbers by July 15, or 21 days after treatment, over untreated cotton. Treatment of cotton with flowering rate of 5 flowers per 25 feet of row increased small boll numbers by July 29 or 35 days after treatment.
    • Planting Patterns Under Drip Irrigation

      Farr, C. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Planting pattern 2x1 skip row cotton outyielded variable row 32"x44" per gross field acre under drip irrigation with saline water. Skip row planting in deep water areas appears to be a feasible selection with high water cost, reduced tubing requirement, lowered land rentals and increased yield response.
    • Trickle and Level Basin Irrigation for 1985 Cotton at the Maricopa Agricultural Center

      French, O. F.; Bucks, D. A.; Roth, R. L.; Gardner, B. R.; Lakatos, E. A.; Alexander, W. A.; Powers, D. E.; U. S. Water Conservation Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Both trickle and level-basin irrigation methods, when properly managed and operated, achieved high cotton yields and water use efficiencies on a low water holding capacity soil in 1985. A maximum lint yield of 1906 kg/ha (3.8 bales/ac) was achieved for the DPL-90 variety with a single trickle irrigation line per every two rows irrigated daily on the narrow row spacing; however, the new DPL-775 was best overall. The single trickle line per every two rows irrigated daily averaged 15% more lint cotton than the level-basin, every furrow irrigated weekly for both row spacings. The narrow-row spacing (30 inch between rows) outyielded the conventional spacing (40 inch between rows) by 15%, partly because of a higher plant populations. Daily trickle irrigations averaged about 10% more yield than the twice weekly trickle irrigations, and the weekly level-basin irrigations averaged over 20% increase in yield over the biweekly (every two weeks) level-basin irrigations. Light-frequent irrigations can be advantageous for nonhomogenous soils in the semiarid Southwestern United States.
    • Report on the Effect of PREP on Cotton Fruiting, Boll Opening, and Boll Weevil Populations

      Henneberry, T. J.; Bariola, L. A.; Leggett, J. E.; Meng, T.; Akey, D.; Deeter, B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
    • Application of Herbicides in Cotton Through Gravity Flow Furrow Irrigation

      Chernicky, J. P.; Hamilton, K. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the potential of applying herbicides in the irrigation water during a furrow irrigation as an alternate method of herbicide application in cotton. Further research is needed to study this method of applying herbicides. If a program could be designed for the Arizona cotton grower, it would help reduce production costs. However before this method can be recommended the environmental impact of such a treatment must be investigated to prevent jeopardizing currently labelled herbicides in cotton.
    • Yield of 8 Upland and 2 Pima Cotton Varieties Planted at 5 Dates at Safford in 1985

      Kittock, D. L.; Hofmann, Wallace C.; Clark, Lee; Thatcher, Max; Else, Peter T.; Malcuit, Joel; Michaud, Carl (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Verticillium wilt tolerance and varietal response were factors in lint yield in this test. Highest yields were obtained from the first planting on 8 April. The 19 April planting had a lower average yield than the 7 May planting, probably because of poorer stands. Lint yields decreased an average of 5 pounds of lint/acre/day between 8 April and 7 May; 9 pounds between 7 May and 24 May; and 15 pounds between 24 May and 10 June. Deltapine (DP) 90 had the highest lint yield for the first two plantings and was among the highest for all plantings. DP 30 was highest in lint yield for the third and fourth plantings and high at other planting dates. Wilt tolerance was a factor in DP 30 performance. If the price premium for pima lint is considered, P-62 was superior to all upland cottons for the first four plantings and Pima S-6 was for the first three plantings. Wilt tolerance was undoubtedly a factor in the pima cotton performance.
    • Comparative Trap Catches in Four Boll Weevil Trap Types

      Meng, T. Jr.; Bariola, L. A.; Henneberry, T. J.; Western Cotton Research Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Four trap types were used to trap boll weevils at 1 m heights, with and without grandlure, and 2 trap types were compared at 0.5 m height, with and without grandlure. The results indicate trap height may be an important factor in boll weevil catches at certain times during the cotton season. Also trap color, design and other factors may influence trap catches since traps not baited with grandlure caught high numbers of boll weevils during certain times during the cotton growing season.
    • Fruit Set Response of Cotton Varity DP-90 to Early Season Insecticide Application

      Barstow, Ben (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      Nodes to first square and number of fruit in early fruiting positions were evaluated in Pinal County early season insecticide trials. Acephate treatments increased the number of fruit in early fruiting positions at three of four locations. Two of these same locations also received sidedressed aldicarb applications, but no significant response to aldicarb was observed.
    • Pheromone and Insecticide Treatments of Nectariless and Nataried Varieties

      Flint, H. M.; Wilson, F. D.; Curtice, N. J.; Western Cotton Research Lab (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      The pink bollworm resistant (nectariless) variety 'Deltapine NSL' yielded as much lint as the standard 'Deltapine-61' (nectaried) under treatments of conventional insecticides or gossyplure and yielded significantly more lint in untreated plots.
    • Comparison of Three and Four Bract Squares on Several Deltapine Cultivars

      Terry, Irene (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-03)
      The number of three and four bract squares on several currently used Deltapine cultivars were observed during the early squaring period in plots untreated and treated for early season insect control. The percent of four bract healthy squares counted in June were higher in Deltapine 41 than several other varieties including Deltapine 90. The percent of four bracts between treated and untreated plots were significantly different in only two out of 5 locations. In another test where both DP 90 and DP 61 were compared for total healthy plus shed squares, DP 90 and DP 61 were equal on several dates in their proportion of three and four bract squares.