• Evaluation of a Feedback vs. Scheduled Approach to PIX Application

      Fletcher, D. C.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Unruh, B. L.; Lewis, E. A.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Two field experiments were conducted in 1993 in Arizona to compare a scheduled approach (based on stage of growth) versus a feedback approach (based on vegetative status) to mepiquat chloride (PIX™) applications on Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). PIX feedback treatments received no PIX applications due to plants lacking vegetative tendencies based upon height:node ratios (HNRs) and established baselines. Scheduled PIX applications ranged from 0.5pt. /acre to 0.75 pt./acre, and were applied at early bloom (approx. 1500 heat units after planting (HUAP), 86/55 °F threshold) and post early bloom (approx. 2000 HUAP). PIX treatments did consistently reduce plant heights compared to an untreated check. Statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in lint yield were observed among the treatments (feedback vs. scheduled)at the Safford location only. Evidence from these studies do reinforce the use of a feedback approach from the standpoint of conserving inputs and maintaining optimum growth control.
    • Nitrogen Management Experiments for Upland and Pima Cotton, 1993

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Unruh, B. L.; Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Two field experiments were conducted in Arizona in 1993 at two locations (Maricopa and Safford). Both experiments have been conducted for five consecutive seasons, with consistent plot locations. The purposes of the experiments were to validate and refine nitrogen (N) fertilization recommendations for both Upland and Pima cotton. The experiments each utilized N management tools such as pre - season soil tests for NO₃⁻-N, in-season plant tissue testing (petioles) for N fertility status, and crop monitoring to ascertain crop fruiting patterns and crop N needs. Results at both locations revealed a strong relationship between the crop fruit retention levels and N needs for the crop. This pattern was further reflected in final yield analysis as a response to the N fertilization regimes used. The effects of N fertility levels have been consistently evident in crop maturity and its relationship to lint yields.
    • Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium Uptake by Upland and Pima Cotton

      Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Steger, A. J.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Several investigations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptake by Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have been conduced, however no investigations of this type have included American Pima cotton (G. barbadense L.). We conducted a study to describe the total N, P, and K uptake and the partitioning of each nutrient into various plant parts for both Upland and Pima cotton. During the growing seasons of 1990, 1991, and 1992 at two south-central Arizona locations, both Upland (var. DPL 90) and Pima (var. S-6) cotton were grown. Beginning 14 to 20 d after emergence, whole cotton plants were removed and cotton plants were separated into stems, leaves (including petioles), burs (carpel walls), lint, and seeds. The bur fraction, also included squares, flowers, immature bolls, and burs from mature bolls. The appropriate analyses for total N, P, and K were determined on each fraction (except lint). Regression analyses was used to model nutrient uptake as a function of both days after planting (DAP) and heat units after planting (HUAP). Regression analyses indicated that HUAP was equally good, and in most cases superior to using DAP to model total nutrient uptake and partitioning within both Upland and Pima cotton. In every case there was close agreement between the predicted and actual total nutrient uptake. For Upland cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 250 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 255 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. For Pima cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 196, 29, and 215 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted was 210, 29, and 229 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. The pattern of nutrient partitioning in Upland cotton were similar to the findings of others and Pima showed the same general patterns of partitioning as Upland cotton. Seeds were a major sink of nutrients. Nutrient uptake in seeds resulted in decreasing uptake in leaves and stems. Presumably, due to mobilization of nutrients from those parts to the seeds during seed development. The nutrient requirements to produce 100 kg lint ha' for Upland cotton was 15, 2.2, and 19 kg ha⁻¹ for N, P, and K, respectively and was 20, 3.0, and 22 kg ha⁻¹, respectively for Pima cotton.
    • Physiological Response of Cotton to Terminal Damage

      Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Hanline-Boerum, T. R.; Marlow, B. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The terminal of a cotton (Gossypium spp.) plant controls the growth of lower vegetative branches through the production of hormones. If the terminal is damaged then the lower vegetative branches will begin to grow and produce new mainstems. The objective of this study was to determine what delays, if any, are caused by damage to the terminal meristem. Three identical experiments (differing only by their planting date) were conducted in the greenhouse in which Upland (G. hirsutum L., var. DPL 5415) cotton was planted in 24 pots and allowed to grow until the majority of the plants reached the four true -leaf stage. At that point half of the plants had their terminals removed. Twice weekly series of plant measurements were recorded for each plant in the study. Measurements taken included the number of mainstem nodes, plant height, node of the first fruiting branch (FFB), days after terminal removal (DATR) until the appearance of the FFB, node of the first bloom, and DATR until the appearance of the first bloom were recorded. Removal of the terminal significantly increased the node of the FFB, the node of the first bloom, and the occurrence of each of these by 7 to 8 days. Regression analysis was used to model plant height and the accumulation of mainstem nodes as a function of DATR. Results showed that plants with terminals removed did reach the same height as the control group. However, the plants with their terminals removed never accumulated as many mainstem nodes as their counterparts in the control group.
    • Potassium Fertilization of Upland and Pima Cotton

      Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Galadima, A.; Clark, L. J.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      In a continuing effort to assess the agronomic necessity of potassium (K) fertilization in Arizona cotton (Gossypium spp.) production, one new and two on-going (Maricopa and Safford Ag. Centers), K fertility studies were conducted in 1993. They included locations ranging from western (Yuma) to eastern (Safford) Arizona, with both Upland (G. hirsutum L.) and American Pima (G. barbadense L.) cotton, using soil and foliar applications of K. The results indicated that there was no response to the added K at any of the locations by either Upland or Pima cotton.