• Validity of the Pinhead Square Treatment Program for Pink Bollworm Suppression and Impact of Several Insecticides on Arthropod Fauna in Cotton

      Ellsworth, Peter C.; Meade, Donna L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A limited chemical control tactic known as pinhead square treatment has gained recent Favor as a component of pink bollworm population management. The strategy has economic and ecologic goals of using reduced insecticides early in the season (to include lower rates, half the acreage, and less potent chemistry) in order to reduce later season risk of pink bollworm infestations. This strategy also depends in part on the cultural tactic which results in "suicidal emergence" of overwintering pink bollworms through optimal planting date management. The combination of these tactics has been used in the past to overcome boll weevil populations area-wide. This study is focused on the evaluation of this system as a basis for pink bollworm suppression. Though only preliminary is presented here, it is clear that there are numerous insects impacted by this practice which interact in complex ways to influence pest populations of all kinds. Furthermore, the fate of such a practice in any production system is also influenced by the specific chemical agent used. This experiment details the use of four different classes of insecticide chemistry as well as one bioinsecticide. The experiment has been duplicated in 1993; however, only 1992 data are shown here.
    • Sweetpotato Whitefly (Bemisia Tabaci Gennadius) Population Relationships to Cotton Yield and Quality

      Chu, C. C.; Henneberry, T. J.; Akey, D. H.; Prabhaker, N.; Perkins, H. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Sweetpotato whitefly (SPWF) Bemisia tabaci Gennadius strain B has been a devastating pest of cotton in Arizona and California in recent years. Management systems involving cultural procedures, SPWF population monitoring crop sanitation, crop sequencing chemical control and other technology are developing slowly. SPWF population information in relation to cotton yield and quality losses are urgently needed Preliminary studies with cotton insecticide treatments initiated each week from shortly after cotton seedling emergence to late in the cotton season were conducted at the Irrigated Desert Research Station, Brawley, CA in 1993. The results suggest significant correlations for numbers of SPWF per leaf disc from cotton leaves vs. cotton yield and lint stickiness. Cotton lint yield was negatively correlated to all stages of SPWF populations (-0.783 or higher). Lint stickiness was high positively correlated to SPWF populations (0.707 or higher) and cotton defoliation was positively correlated to SPWF populations (0.876 or higher).
    • A Community-wide Approach to Whitefly Management

      Diehl, J. W.; Ellsworth, P. C.; Husman, S. H.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      An extension supported, grower controlled, community pest management group was initiated in the Laveen and Tolleson communities of Arizona with the management of sweetpotato whitefly (SPWF) as its initial focus. The three functions of this group were awareness, communication, and cooperation. Increased awareness and communication of pest management problems and solutions were achieved through regular meetings and newsletters. Community cooperation took the form of a community-based overwintering survey and a sticky trap network. These two cooperative activities served both an educational and a research function. From the overwintering survey and the sticky trap network, growers learned about the overwintering habits and movement dynamics of whiteflies in their area, the limits of sticky traps for SPWF detection, the need for the reduction of SPWF populations before they move onto cotton. and the need for careful infield sampling of SPWF populations.
    • Numerical and Binomial Sequential Sampling Plans for Adult Bemisia Tabaci in Cotton

      Naranjo, S. E.; Flint, H. M.; Henneberry, T. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Fixed-precision numerical and binomial sequential sampling plans are reported for adults of Bemisia tabaci (Strain B) on cotton. Both plans are based on whole leaf sample units from the fifth mainstem node (counted from the terminal). Numerical sampling plans allow for the efficient estimation of adult population density. Numerical sampling stop lines are presented relating the cumulative number of adults counted to the number of leaves examined for two levels of statistical precision. Binomial plans were developed to allow classification of adult population density for pest management decision -making application. These plans were devised for three action threshold levels; 5, 10 or 15 adults per leaf Binomial sampling stop lines are presented relating the cumulative number of infested leaves to the number of leaves examined as an aid for determining the need for population suppression.
    • Whole Season Rotational Pesticide System for Integrated Pest Management for Control of Sweetpotato Whitefly in Cotton

      Akey, D. H.; Henneberry, T. J.; Wuertz, D. A.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA, ARS, Western Cotton Res. Lab., Phoenix, 85040; Sundance Farms, Coolidge, AZ 85228 (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A season long pesticide rotational system for cotton management of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (SPWF) was put in place. The system tried to minimize pesticide impact on midseason build -up of beneficials against SPWF. SPWF thresholds were used to begin use of "potent, efficient" insecticides to stop exponential increase of SPWF in late season. Insecticide class rotation was a key element of the system to prevent insecticide resistance. Comparisons between test blocks and best agricultural practices for rest of field showed that SPWF eggs and large immature of September populations, yields (2.68 bales /Ac), and beneficials were about the same among the blocks. The cotton was free of stickiness in the entire field.
    • The Effects of PIX Application Timing on Upland Cotton Lint Yield and Growth and Development Parameters

      Husman, S. H.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Six commercial scale field studies were conducted from 1991-1993 to further evaluate and predict Upland cotton yield and development responses to PIX application timing as a function of cotton growth and condition. Treatments imposed intended to further clarify some response trends observed in previous years of field studies. Treatments were all at the maximum label rate of one and one half pints with application timing the main variable. Timing was based on heat unit accumulation and resultant growth stage since date of planting. Two of the six studies resulted in significant lint yield increase of roughly one hundred pounds across all PIX treatments in contrast to the untreated check. The two studies which resulted in lint yield increases both had height: node ratio measurements in excess (vegetative) of previously defined guidelines.
    • Boll Maturity Estimates for Mid- and Late-Season Flowering Dates in Arizona

      Brown, P. W.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Boll maturity dates and the number of days after flowering for a boll to reach physiological maturity were estimated for six representative flower dates: 15 July, 29 July, 12 August, 26 August, 9 September and 23 September. Estimates were developed for 28 locations using historical heat unit (HU) information using the assumption that 600 HUs are required after flowering for a boll to reach physiological maturity. The results are presented in both tabular and graphical forms.
    • Effect of Plant Water Status on Defoliation and Yield of Pima Cotton

      Nelson, J. M.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A field study was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to determine the influence of plant water status at the time of defoliation on the effectiveness of defoliants and the yield of Pima cotton. Irrigation termination dates of 3 and 20 September and 8 October were used to achieve different levels of plant water stress at the time defoliants were applied (26 October). A single application of defoliants was not adequate to defoliate the cotton under the conditions of this test. The 3 September irrigation termination date resulted in the highest percentage of defoliation (63 %). CWSI and plant water content (RWC) measurements indicated that the irrigation termination treatments resulted in large differences in plant water stress at defoliation time. There was a significant increase in the percent defoliation as the CWSI values increased from 0.54 to 0.99.
    • Nutsedge Control in Cotton Using Norflurazon (Zorial Rapid 80): A Progress Report

      McCloskey, William B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Field experiments were conducted in 1992 and 1993 to determine the crop safety and efficacy of norflurazon applications for control of purple and yellow nutsedge in cotton. Norflurazon was applied preplant-incorporated (PPI) or in two applications, PPI and postemergence (POST) when cotton was 3 to 4" tall. As the PPI norflurazon application rate increased from 0.5 to 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 lb a.i./A, early season nutsedge control increased from 29 to 49, 58, and 76% of control. Early season weed control declined after about 6 weeks. POST emergence applications of norflurazon prolonged the period of nutsedge control. Data collected 71 and 21 days after the PPI and POST applications, respectively, showed that the 0.5 +1.5, 0.75 +1.25, and 1.0+1.0 lb a.i./A (PPI +POST) treatments resulted in 85, 76, and 73% control of nutsedges. Nutsedge control declined throughout the season with the 0.5 +1.5, 0.75 +1.25, and 1.0+1.0 lb a. i./A split applications all resulting in about 27% control 3 months after the POST applications. PPI rates 1.5 to 2 times the labeled rate for a particular soil type caused cotton injury in several experiments in the 1993 cotton season although no injury was observed in the 1992 season.
    • Initial Post Plant Irrigation Effects on Low Desert Upland Cotton Yields Using Leaf Water Potential Measurements

      Husman, S. H.; Barrot, D. J. Jr.; O'Leary, J. W.; Moore, M.; Wegener, R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Leaf water potential (LWP) measurements using a pressure chamber were used to determine optimum timing of the first irrigation following planting on Upland cotton in 1992 and 1993. Previous studies have indicated that leaf water potentials are dependent on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of the surrounding air. As a result, the VPD was accounted for in the development of a Leaf Water Potential Index (LWPI). The field studies consisted of three irrigation treatments with four replicates arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCB). Targeted treatment thresholds were 0.15 LWPI (wet), 0.30 LWPI (medium), and 0.45 LWPI (dry). Timing of the first irrigation for the 1992 study occurred at 36, 53, and 63 days after planting. Timing of the 1993 first irrigation occurred at 50, 61, and 77 days after planting for the wet, medium, and dry treatments respectively. There were no significant lint yield differences between irrigation treatments in both 1992 and 1993.
    • The Use of AZSCHED to Schedule Irrigation on Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center - 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, Eddie W.; Slack, Donald C.; Martin, Edward C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      An irrigation scheduling trial was implemented on both long and short staple cotton on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1993. It is a continuation of studies initiated in 1991, where plots were irrigated when they reached 40 %, 50% and 60% soil water depletion level as predicted by the AZSCHED software. Results for this study are given as well as a summary of the three year study.
    • Pima Cotton Improvement

      Percy, R. G.; Turcotte, E. L.; Ray, I. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Pima experimental strains P73, P75, P76, P77, and the cultivars Pima S-6 (PS-6) and Pima S-7 (PS-7) were grown in replicated regional tests at twelve locations across the Pima belt in 1993. Tests were machine harvested for yield determination, plant heights were measured, and lint samples were collected for fiber analysis. Considerable genotype by environment interaction for yield potential occurred across tests in 1993. Across all locations, the strain P76 ranked first in yield followed by the cultivar PS-7 and strain P75. Strains P73 and P76 produced fiber of equal or greater length, strength, and elongation than PS-7. Plant heights were greatest for the entries PS-6 and P75. Entries PS-7 and P73 were intermediate in height, while P76 and P77 were the shortest of the entries tested. Considering yield and fiber properties concurrently, P76 was the superior entry of the 1993 tests.
    • Physiological Response of Cotton to Terminal Damage

      Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Hanline-Boerum, T. R.; Marlow, B. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The terminal of a cotton (Gossypium spp.) plant controls the growth of lower vegetative branches through the production of hormones. If the terminal is damaged then the lower vegetative branches will begin to grow and produce new mainstems. The objective of this study was to determine what delays, if any, are caused by damage to the terminal meristem. Three identical experiments (differing only by their planting date) were conducted in the greenhouse in which Upland (G. hirsutum L., var. DPL 5415) cotton was planted in 24 pots and allowed to grow until the majority of the plants reached the four true -leaf stage. At that point half of the plants had their terminals removed. Twice weekly series of plant measurements were recorded for each plant in the study. Measurements taken included the number of mainstem nodes, plant height, node of the first fruiting branch (FFB), days after terminal removal (DATR) until the appearance of the FFB, node of the first bloom, and DATR until the appearance of the first bloom were recorded. Removal of the terminal significantly increased the node of the FFB, the node of the first bloom, and the occurrence of each of these by 7 to 8 days. Regression analysis was used to model plant height and the accumulation of mainstem nodes as a function of DATR. Results showed that plants with terminals removed did reach the same height as the control group. However, the plants with their terminals removed never accumulated as many mainstem nodes as their counterparts in the control group.
    • Effect of Foliar Applications of PGRIV on Yield of Upland and Pima Cotton

      Nelson, J. M.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The commercial product PGRIV was tested in small plots on cotton at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Multiple foliar applications of PGRIV had no significant effect on lint yield or fiber properties of DP5415 or Pima S-7 cotton.
    • Methanol Treatments on Pima and Upland Cotton

      Nelson, J. M.; Nakayama, F. S.; Flint, H. M.; Garcia, R. L.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A study was conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ in 1993 to determine the effect of foliar applications of methanol on cotton physiology, growth, yield and whitefly infestation. Six applications of a 30% methanol solution during bloom had no effect on plant height, boll weight, lint yield or earliness of Pima S-7 (Gossvpium barbadense L.) or upland DP5415 (Gossvpium hirsutum L.) cotton. No effect of methanol on photosynthesis or photorespiration was observed. A significant reduction in sweetpotato whitefly nymph population occurred on DP5415 cotton seven weeks after methanol treatment began. This study provided no evidence that methanol can be used to improve cotton production.
    • The Effect of Night Temperature on Cotton Reproductive Development

      Zeiher, Carolyn A.; Brown, Paul W.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Matumba, Nkonko; Mitton, Nancy; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A field study was initiated in the summer of 1993 to investigate the effect of increased night temperatures on cotton reproductive development. DPL 5415 was planted on May 10. Treatments consisted of two temperature regimes placed in a completely randomized design with four replications. The two temperature treatments were initiated at first bloom and treatments terminated after 6 weeks. Cotton grown under ambient night temperature served as the control treatments while plants where the infrared radiation balance was modified to increase the nighttime foliage temperature served as the high night temperature treatment. This study showed that increasing the nighttime foliage temperature of cotton reduced vegetative dry matter production, plant height, and fruit retention. The photosynthetic capacity of the two treatments was not significantly different, suggesting that increased respiration at these higher nighttime foliage temperatures may be responsible for the reduction in assimilated carbon which contributed to the poor fruit retention.
    • Upland Regional Cotton Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1993

      Hart, G.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Thirty-six upland cotton varieties were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the National Cotton Variety Testing Program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, gin turnout percent, plant population and fiber property data are presented in this report.
    • Use of Leaf Water Potentials to Determine Timing of Initial Post-Plant Irrigation

      Steger, A. J.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Brown, P. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Presumably, from a physiological standpoint, early season water stress should be avoided to ensure early fruit initiation, good fruit retention, and optimum yield potential of cotton (Gossypium spp.). This study was conducted to determine the optimum timing of the initial post plant irrigation and the long term effect of postponement on subsequent plant growth patterns, fruit retention, and yield. A short - season Upland variety, (G. hirsutum L.), DPL 20, was planted on 19 April in Marana, AZ, elevation 1970 ft. , on a Pima clay loam (Typic Torrifluvent) soil. Plots (experimental units) consisted of eight 40 in. rows and extended the full length of the irrigation run (600 ft.). Experimental design was a randomized complete block with four replications. Initial post - plant irrigations, designated T1 , 72, and T3, were applied when the midday leaf water potential (ψ) of the uppermost, fully- developed leaf reached -15, -19, and -23 bars, respectively. All treatments received the same irrigation regime following the initial post plant irrigation. Basic plant measurements were taken weekly from each experimental unit. These included plant height, number of mainstem nodes, location of first fruiting branch, fruit retention, number of nodes above the uppermost white bloom, bloom count within a 166 ft² area, and percent canopy cover. Soil -water data at seven 25 cm depth increments was collected from a total of 36 access tubes located within the field study, with three tubes per plot. Lint yields (lb. lint /acre) were 1112, 1095, and 977 for T1 , 72, and T3, respectively. Yields were significantly lower when the initial post plant irrigation was applied after ψ, dropped below -19 bars, confirming the results of a previous study conducted in 1992. Throughout the growing season, height - node ratios (HNR) of T1 and 72 plants were at or above the upper threshold established for DPL 20, while T3 HNR remained close to the expected baseline. Fruit retention was low for all three treatments due to season -long insect pressure from lygus bug. The low fruit retention data reflects the effects of high HNR. Future work will include efforts to separate changes in ψ due to day-to-day climatic variations from those caused by soil -water depletion. A second objective will be to incorporate the data obtained from the neutron moisture meter probe into the study results in an effort to better describe the complete soil-plant-atmosphere continuum as affected by the various treatment regimes employed in this study.
    • Arizona Upland Cotton Variety Testing Program

      Silvertooth, J.; Norton, R.; Clark, L.; Hood, L.; Husman, S.; Cluff, R.; Stedman, S.; Thacker, G.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Ten field experiments were conducted across the cotton growing areas of Arizona in 1993 for the purpose of evaluating Upland cotton varieties in terms of adaptability and performance. Five commercial cottonseed companies participated in the program. Two varieties were submitted from each company at each location. Experiments were conducted on grower -cooperator fields in each case. Locations used in the program spanned the range of conditions common to cotton producing areas of the state from about 500 ft. to 4,000 ft. elevation. Results indicated a broad range of adaptability and competitiveness on the part of each of the participating companies and their representative varieties. Each of the companies offers a compliment of varieties that can serve to match various production strategies commonly employed in the state as well as showing a strong capacity to be regionally adaptive.
    • Methanol Effect on Upland Cotton

      Husman, S. H.; McCloskey, W. B.; Molin, W. T.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The effects of foliar applied methanol on Upland cotton were measured in a large field study in Phoenix, AZ. An untreated check was compared to weekly applications of 30% methanol, 30% methanol plus 1% Urea and 0.1 % Fe EDTA, and 1% Urea and 0.1% Fe EDTA. Plant growth and development, photosynthesis, transpiration, soil water use and lint yields were measured. There were no differences in any of the measured variables between treatments.