• Evaluation of Trap Crops as a Component of a Community-Wide Pink Bollworm Control Program

      Thacker, Gary W.; Moore, Leon; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Combs, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Trap crops were evaluated as a part of a community -wide pink bollworm (PBW) control program. We measured extraordinarily high numbers of PBW larvae in the trap crops in 1992, which indicated that the trap crops were attracting PBW moths from wide areas. However, we have no direct way of measuring any effect this would have on the main crop. Overall PBW populations were very low in 1993. While PBW numbers drastically declined in the community, this study offers no conclusive evidence as to whether trap crops are an effective component of a community-wide IPM program.
    • Cotton Producers Working in Unison: The Multi-Component IPM Program in Marana, AZ

      Thacker, Gary W.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Moore, Leon; Combs, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Cotton growers in Pima County, Arizona are working together to implement a community-wide Integrated Pest Management program. Participation is voluntary; and is unanimous in at least some components of the program. The IPM program employs many control components aimed at the pink bollworm, the principle cotton insect pest in the area. Growers time the deployment of the control components to act in unison throughout the community. Insecticide applications in the area have trended downward since the program began in 1991, indicating that we are making progress toward our goal of reducing the reliance on pesticides.
    • Do Prowl and Treflan Cause Cotton Injury?

      Moffett, Jody; McCloskey, William B.; Husman, Stephen H.; Dixon, Gary L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Two dinitroaniline herbicides, Prowl and Treflan, were tested in field experiments with cotton to determine their differences, if any, in terms of weed control and crop injury potential. Plots treated with the lowest rate of Treflan (0.125 lb a.i./A at one location and 0.25 lb a.i./A at a second location) exhibited reduced weed control in comparison to the other herbicide treatments. Although root inhibition was slight, lateral root growth of cotton was inhibited more by the higher rates of Treflan (0.75 and 1.0 lb a.i./A) than by the higher rates of Prowl (1.0 and 1.25 lb a.i./A). However, differences in weed control and crop injury were not reflected in differences in cotton stand counts, height measurements and yield as there were no significant differences in these parameters between treatments.
    • Nutsedge Control in Cotton Using Norflurazon (Zorial Rapid 80): A Progress Report

      McCloskey, William B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Field experiments were conducted in 1992 and 1993 to determine the crop safety and efficacy of norflurazon applications for control of purple and yellow nutsedge in cotton. Norflurazon was applied preplant-incorporated (PPI) or in two applications, PPI and postemergence (POST) when cotton was 3 to 4" tall. As the PPI norflurazon application rate increased from 0.5 to 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 lb a.i./A, early season nutsedge control increased from 29 to 49, 58, and 76% of control. Early season weed control declined after about 6 weeks. POST emergence applications of norflurazon prolonged the period of nutsedge control. Data collected 71 and 21 days after the PPI and POST applications, respectively, showed that the 0.5 +1.5, 0.75 +1.25, and 1.0+1.0 lb a.i./A (PPI +POST) treatments resulted in 85, 76, and 73% control of nutsedges. Nutsedge control declined throughout the season with the 0.5 +1.5, 0.75 +1.25, and 1.0+1.0 lb a. i./A split applications all resulting in about 27% control 3 months after the POST applications. PPI rates 1.5 to 2 times the labeled rate for a particular soil type caused cotton injury in several experiments in the 1993 cotton season although no injury was observed in the 1992 season.
    • The Use of AZSCHED to Schedule Irrigation on Cotton, Safford Agricultural Center - 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Carpenter, Eddie W.; Slack, Donald C.; Martin, Edward C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      An irrigation scheduling trial was implemented on both long and short staple cotton on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1993. It is a continuation of studies initiated in 1991, where plots were irrigated when they reached 40 %, 50% and 60% soil water depletion level as predicted by the AZSCHED software. Results for this study are given as well as a summary of the three year study.
    • Irrigation Efficiencies and Lint Yields of Upland Cotton Grown at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1993

      Sheedy, Mike; Watson, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      The computer program AZSCHED, with weather data obtained from AZMET, was used to schedule irrigations for a yield trial of early season Upland Cotton (DPL 20) at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Cotton lint yields were compared between plots from five treatments involving five irrigation efficiencies (50 %, 65 %, 75 %, 90% and 110 %). As in previous years, a potassium bromide tracer was applied to select areas in each plot to monitor the movement of water and nitrates down the soil profile. The total amount of fertilizer as nitrogen applied in two split applications and sidedressed was 100 #/a. The total amount of water applied to the plots ranged from 42.7" for 50% to 26.6" for 110% (deficit) irrigation efficiency. The plots were harvested on October 5, 1993. There was a significant difference in lint yield between the irrigation efficiency treatments. The 50% irrigation efficiency treatment produced 1190 # lint /acre while the 110% efficiency produced 883 # lint /acre.
    • Initial Post Plant Irrigation Effects on Low Desert Upland Cotton Yields Using Leaf Water Potential Measurements

      Husman, S. H.; Barrot, D. J. Jr.; O'Leary, J. W.; Moore, M.; Wegener, R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Leaf water potential (LWP) measurements using a pressure chamber were used to determine optimum timing of the first irrigation following planting on Upland cotton in 1992 and 1993. Previous studies have indicated that leaf water potentials are dependent on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of the surrounding air. As a result, the VPD was accounted for in the development of a Leaf Water Potential Index (LWPI). The field studies consisted of three irrigation treatments with four replicates arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCB). Targeted treatment thresholds were 0.15 LWPI (wet), 0.30 LWPI (medium), and 0.45 LWPI (dry). Timing of the first irrigation for the 1992 study occurred at 36, 53, and 63 days after planting. Timing of the 1993 first irrigation occurred at 50, 61, and 77 days after planting for the wet, medium, and dry treatments respectively. There were no significant lint yield differences between irrigation treatments in both 1992 and 1993.
    • Use of Leaf Water Potentials to Determine Timing of Initial Post-Plant Irrigation

      Steger, A. J.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Brown, P. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Presumably, from a physiological standpoint, early season water stress should be avoided to ensure early fruit initiation, good fruit retention, and optimum yield potential of cotton (Gossypium spp.). This study was conducted to determine the optimum timing of the initial post plant irrigation and the long term effect of postponement on subsequent plant growth patterns, fruit retention, and yield. A short - season Upland variety, (G. hirsutum L.), DPL 20, was planted on 19 April in Marana, AZ, elevation 1970 ft. , on a Pima clay loam (Typic Torrifluvent) soil. Plots (experimental units) consisted of eight 40 in. rows and extended the full length of the irrigation run (600 ft.). Experimental design was a randomized complete block with four replications. Initial post - plant irrigations, designated T1 , 72, and T3, were applied when the midday leaf water potential (ψ) of the uppermost, fully- developed leaf reached -15, -19, and -23 bars, respectively. All treatments received the same irrigation regime following the initial post plant irrigation. Basic plant measurements were taken weekly from each experimental unit. These included plant height, number of mainstem nodes, location of first fruiting branch, fruit retention, number of nodes above the uppermost white bloom, bloom count within a 166 ft² area, and percent canopy cover. Soil -water data at seven 25 cm depth increments was collected from a total of 36 access tubes located within the field study, with three tubes per plot. Lint yields (lb. lint /acre) were 1112, 1095, and 977 for T1 , 72, and T3, respectively. Yields were significantly lower when the initial post plant irrigation was applied after ψ, dropped below -19 bars, confirming the results of a previous study conducted in 1992. Throughout the growing season, height - node ratios (HNR) of T1 and 72 plants were at or above the upper threshold established for DPL 20, while T3 HNR remained close to the expected baseline. Fruit retention was low for all three treatments due to season -long insect pressure from lygus bug. The low fruit retention data reflects the effects of high HNR. Future work will include efforts to separate changes in ψ due to day-to-day climatic variations from those caused by soil -water depletion. A second objective will be to incorporate the data obtained from the neutron moisture meter probe into the study results in an effort to better describe the complete soil-plant-atmosphere continuum as affected by the various treatment regimes employed in this study.
    • Long Staple Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1993

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Sixteen long staple cotton varieties (including 4 Pima experimental lines) were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Plots were machine harvested twice to determine yield and percent first pick Small hand samples were taken to determine boll size, percent lint turnout and fiber qualities. Pima S-6 was the highest yielding variety with 1110 pounds per acre of lint. Five of the sixteen varieties yielded over 2 bales per acre. A new variety OA 312 looks particularly promising with yield very close to S-6, fiber quality better than S-6 and an earliness that approaches that of S-7.
    • Pima Regional Variety Test Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1993

      Hart, G.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Twelve Pima varieties and experimental strains were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Lint yield, boll size, lint %, gin turnout %, plant population and fiber property data are presented in this report.
    • Pima Cotton Improvement

      Percy, R. G.; Turcotte, E. L.; Ray, I. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Pima experimental strains P73, P75, P76, P77, and the cultivars Pima S-6 (PS-6) and Pima S-7 (PS-7) were grown in replicated regional tests at twelve locations across the Pima belt in 1993. Tests were machine harvested for yield determination, plant heights were measured, and lint samples were collected for fiber analysis. Considerable genotype by environment interaction for yield potential occurred across tests in 1993. Across all locations, the strain P76 ranked first in yield followed by the cultivar PS-7 and strain P75. Strains P73 and P76 produced fiber of equal or greater length, strength, and elongation than PS-7. Plant heights were greatest for the entries PS-6 and P75. Entries PS-7 and P73 were intermediate in height, while P76 and P77 were the shortest of the entries tested. Considering yield and fiber properties concurrently, P76 was the superior entry of the 1993 tests.
    • Pima Cotton Genetics

      Percy, R. G.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A feasibility study of short season management in Pima cotton, using short season genotypes, was initiated in 1993. Four short season genotypes, a full season check, and a short season check were evaluated in replicated tests under short season and full season regimes. In this first preliminary year of data, no significant yield loss could be attributed to management regime or to earliness of genotypes. Three of the putative early maturing genotypes exceeded the full season Pima S-7 check in yield. Results were contrary to expectations. The short season test is planned for repeat in 1994. An investigation of a virescent mutant discovered in 1990 (CM-1-90) was conducted in 1991, 1992, and 1993. Crosses of the mutant to Pima S-6 to determine inheritance, and to various virescent mutants to determine allelism produced results which were anamolous to normal, nuclear inheritance. Reciprocal crosses to PS-6 and to various virescent mutants confirmed that the new mutant was cytoplasmicaly inherited.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Ten short staple cotton varieties including four New Mexico acalas, one New Mexico experimental acala, three California acalas, one hybrid acala and a rust resistant variety from Mexico were tested in the 1993 variety study. The highest yielding variety was Maxxa with a lint yield of 832 pounds per acre. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, boll weights, plant heights and plant populations are shown. Average boll weights are compared between this location and three other elevations varying from 1400 feet to 4100 feet above sea level.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One trial, north of Kansas Settlement, tested nine acalas and one rust resistant variety from Mexico. The other trial, south of Kansas Settlement and east of Pearce, tested three acalas and nine upland varieties. Top yielding varieties were Maxxa, in the acala trial and DPL 2056 in the upland trial. Yields were lower than expected due to adverse weather conditions, including hail.
    • Short Staple Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1993

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Fifty three short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. HS SAL 10, a long season variety, was the highest yielding variety in the trial with a lint yield of 1772 pounds per acre. Average yields in this trial were lower than in 1992, even though there were more heat units during the growing season. HVI data for the varieties in the trial are included in this report.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstrations, Graham County, 1993

      Clark, Lee J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Two on farm, replicated short staple variety demonstrations were established in 1993. Twelve varieties were evaluated in one location and fifteen varieties were evaluated at the other. Delta Pine 90 was the highest yielding variety at one location with a yield of 1387 pounds of lint per acre and Stoneville LA 887 was the highest yielding variety at the other location with a yield of 1134 pounds of lint per acre.
    • Upland Regional Cotton Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1993

      Hart, G.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Thirty-six upland cotton varieties were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center as part of the National Cotton Variety Testing Program. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, gin turnout percent, plant population and fiber property data are presented in this report.
    • Arizona Upland Cotton Variety Testing Program

      Silvertooth, J.; Norton, R.; Clark, L.; Hood, L.; Husman, S.; Cluff, R.; Stedman, S.; Thacker, G.; Silvertooth, Jeff; University of Arizona Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Ten field experiments were conducted across the cotton growing areas of Arizona in 1993 for the purpose of evaluating Upland cotton varieties in terms of adaptability and performance. Five commercial cottonseed companies participated in the program. Two varieties were submitted from each company at each location. Experiments were conducted on grower -cooperator fields in each case. Locations used in the program spanned the range of conditions common to cotton producing areas of the state from about 500 ft. to 4,000 ft. elevation. Results indicated a broad range of adaptability and competitiveness on the part of each of the participating companies and their representative varieties. Each of the companies offers a compliment of varieties that can serve to match various production strategies commonly employed in the state as well as showing a strong capacity to be regionally adaptive.
    • Plant Growth Regulator Studies at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1993

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      Results from several tests both on the Safford Agricultural Center and off are reported on in this paper. Methano4 Cytokin, X-Cyto, Temik and Amplify-D treatments results are included and discussed.
    • Methanol Treatments on Pima and Upland Cotton

      Nelson, J. M.; Nakayama, F. S.; Flint, H. M.; Garcia, R. L.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-03)
      A study was conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ in 1993 to determine the effect of foliar applications of methanol on cotton physiology, growth, yield and whitefly infestation. Six applications of a 30% methanol solution during bloom had no effect on plant height, boll weight, lint yield or earliness of Pima S-7 (Gossvpium barbadense L.) or upland DP5415 (Gossvpium hirsutum L.) cotton. No effect of methanol on photosynthesis or photorespiration was observed. A significant reduction in sweetpotato whitefly nymph population occurred on DP5415 cotton seven weeks after methanol treatment began. This study provided no evidence that methanol can be used to improve cotton production.