• Host Preference of Silverleaf Whitefly and Factors Associated with Feeding Site Preference

      Chu, C. C.; Hennberry, T. J.; Cohen, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii, Bellows and Perring, preferred cantaloupe to cotton, broccoli and lettuce in field and greenhouse studies. In the absence of cantaloupe, SLW preferred cotton to broccoli and lettuce. In the field, more eggs and fewer nymphs were found on broccoli than on cotton. Differences in the relative abundance of vascular bundles per unit of leaf area between the four plant species may partly account for differences in oviposition site selection. Vascular bundle volume/unit of leaf tissue volume was 50% greater in cantaloupe than in cotton and broccoli, which in turn were significantly greater than in lettuce. Most SLW on cotton leaves are found on underside leaf surfaces. Distances from top and underside leaf surfaces to the nearest vascular bundles in cotton leaves were 131 and 60 tun, respectively, in the present studies.
    • Irrigation Frequency and Cotton Yield in Short-Season Cotton Systems

      Chu, Chang-chi; Henneberry, Thomas J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      We tested the hypothesis that small frequent irrigations during the July cotton peak fruiting stage would result in better fruiting and higher cotton yields than the same amount of water applied less frequently. Over three years under a short - season production system, irrigation intervals of every 5-d with 42 mm of water applied at each irrigation increased cotton lint yield by 5-11 % compared to irrigation intervals of 10- and 15-d with 80 and 130 mm of water applied at each irrigation, respectively. The results show that small, frequent furrow irrigations during cotton fruiting are highly effective in reducing water deficit during critical growth stages and improved lint production in a short - season cultural system. Soil salt content in the top 15 cm of soil was not increased after three years of study.
    • Silverleaf Whitefly: Honeydew Sugars and Relationship to Sticky Cotton

      Henneberry, T. J.; Hendrix, D. L.; Perkins, H. H.; Forlow Jech, L.; Burke, R. A.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ; USDA-ARS, SAA, Clemson, SC (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      In cotton plots heavily infested with silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring, amounts (mg /g of lint) of sugar (fructose, glucose and sucrose combination) on lint from tagged bolls, varied but showed a general trend to increasing amounts with increasing time of exposure (days) for 52 days. Minicard lint stickiness ratings responded in a similar manner and all values were above acceptable thresholds. Lint from harvested mature open bolls that were exposed on trays suspended in the interior of SLW infested cotton plots showed increasing amounts of sugar and higher minicard ratings after 6 days. Amounts of sugar and minicard ratings were drastically reduced following rains of 1.5 inches.