• 1993 Parker Valley & Mohave Valley Short Staple Cotton Variety Trial

      Hood, L. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two short staple cotton variety trials were conducted in the Colorado River Basin. One trial was located in the Parker Valley and one in the Mohave Valley. Ten varieties from various seed companies were entered in each test. Yields varied considerably among varieties and locations. However, these trials among others provides evidence that current variety choices are viable components of Arizona cotton production.
    • The 1995 Arizona Cotton Advisory Program

      Brown, P.; Russell, B.; Silvertooth, J.; Ellsworth, P.; Stedman, S.; Thacker, G.; Husman, S.; Cluff, R.; Howell, D.; Winans, S.; Grumbles, R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Arizona Cooperative Extension generates and distributes weather -based Planting Date and Cotton Development Advisories for 11 cotton production areas (Marana, Laveen, Paloma, Litchfield Pk., Pinal Co., Parker, Mohave Valley, Queen Creek, Safford, Yuma Valley, and Aguila). Planting Date Advisories are distributed from mid- February through the end of April and stress 1) planting cotton varieties according to heat unit accumulations rather than calendar date and 2) the importance of soil temperature to good germination. Cotton Development Advisories are distributed from early May through mid -September and provide updates on crop development, insects, weather and agronomy. The Cotton Advisory Program will continue in 1994 and growers may obtain the advisories by mail or fax from the local county extension office, and by computer from the AZMET computer bulletin board. Improved normal weather statistics and the addition of an advisory for Cochise County are the main changes planned for the 1995 program.
    • Multiple Plant Growth Regulator Use on Short Staple Cotton

      Hood, L. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A field trial was conducted during the 1992 & 1993 growing seasons to evaluate the activity of Cytokin and Pic applied alone or in combination to short staple cotton. The Cytokin treatment significantly increased tint yield over the other treatments in 1992. There were no statistically significant seed cotton differences between the non - treated check and any treatment in 1993. Fruit retention remained high throughout 1992 and very high throughout the 1993 season. Under high fruiting conditions, use of a plant growth regulator would not normally be recommended.
    • Silverleaf Whitefly: Honeydew Sugars and Relationship to Sticky Cotton

      Henneberry, T. J.; Hendrix, D. L.; Perkins, H. H.; Forlow Jech, L.; Burke, R. A.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ; USDA-ARS, SAA, Clemson, SC (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      In cotton plots heavily infested with silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring, amounts (mg /g of lint) of sugar (fructose, glucose and sucrose combination) on lint from tagged bolls, varied but showed a general trend to increasing amounts with increasing time of exposure (days) for 52 days. Minicard lint stickiness ratings responded in a similar manner and all values were above acceptable thresholds. Lint from harvested mature open bolls that were exposed on trays suspended in the interior of SLW infested cotton plots showed increasing amounts of sugar and higher minicard ratings after 6 days. Amounts of sugar and minicard ratings were drastically reduced following rains of 1.5 inches.
    • Short Staple Cotton Advanced Strains Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Twenty six short staple advanced strains/varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. SureGrow SGX247 was the highest yielding cultivar in the trial with a lint yield of 1628 pounds per acre. The exciting feature of this trial is that the top two swains exceeded the highest yield in the Regional variety trial by 100 to 150 pounds of lint. This is the first time that so many advanced strains were tested in a given year. The site at Safford gives cotton breeders an insight as to how their advanced strains or new varieties will perform in the high deserts of Arizona and New Mexico. HVI data for the varieties in the trial indicate that the average fiber length was greater than 1.11 inches and the average fiber strength was greater than 30 grams/tex.
    • 1994 Cottonseed Treatment Evaluations

      Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Cottonseed was treated with several fungicide treatments in an effort to protect the seed and seedling from disease. Seed germination and vigor was evaluated in three Arizona locations; Maricopa, Marana, and Safford. Stand counts were taken on two separate dates after emergence at both Safford and Marana and once at Maricopa and percent emergence was calculated. Among the three locations two, Marana and Safford, showed significant differences among treatments. Treatment number 5 placed first at both locations where significant differences were found. The untreated control placed last in the ranking at both Marana and Safford for all dates of sampling.
    • Effect of Combinations of Accelerate and other Defoliants on Defoliation and Yield of Pima and Upland Cotton

      Nelson, J. M.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Field studies were conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural center to evaluate the effectiveness of Accelerate when used in combination with other defoliants. In addition, an experimental compound was tested as a boll opener. Air temperatures were very high at the time these tests were conducted and most defoliant treatments caused desiccation of Pima leaves 7 days after treatments were applied. Several treatments did result in acceptable defoliation of Pima cotton 14 days after application. In the upland test, Ginstar used alone resulted in higher defoliation percentages than any combination of defoliants. Boll opener treatments had no effect on boll opening of Pima or upland cotton. In these tests, there were no differences among treatments in lint yield or fiber properties.
    • Short Staple Regional Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Fifty five short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Germain's GC 9033, a variety with the same apparent maturity as DP 90 was the top variety for seedcotton yield but came in third place in lint yield behind two varieties from Australia. Average yields were about 200 lbs per acre lower than 1993, which were about 200 pounds per acre lower than in 1992. HW data for the varieties in the trial are included in this report.
    • Effect of Planting Date on Yield of Upland and Pima Cotton Varieties at Marana

      Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Brown, P. W.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A single field experiment was conducted at Marana Agricultural Center (2000 fl elevation) to evaluate the response of one Pima (G. barbadense L) and two Upland (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cotton varieties to three different planting dates. Planting dates ranged from 12 April to 16 May. In general there was decreasing lint yield with later planting dates.
    • Development of a Yield Projection Technique for Upland and Pima Cotton

      Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A series of boll measurements were taken at two locations in 1994 on 5 different varieties in an attempt to develop a yield prediction model. Measurements were taken in strip plot variety trials at Maricopa Agricultural Center and Marana Agricultural Center over a period of approximately 2 months from peak bloom through cut-out. Measurements taken included boll weight, boll diameter, bolls/meter, plants/meter, and final yield from each specific measurement area. Stepwise linear regression resulted in a yield prediction model expressing yield as a function of heat units accumulated after planting, boll diameter or boll weight, and bolls/meter.
    • Chemical Control of the Sweetpotato Whitefly in Cotton

      Watson, T. F.; Tellez, M. A.; Peña, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Various registered and experimental insecticides were evaluated for sweetpotato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius) control in several field experiments at Yuma, Arizona in 1994. Best controls were obtained with insecticide mixtures, particularly a pyrethroid and an organophosphate, rather than with individual materials. Results of these experiments indicate that severe population densities can be controlled using insecticide combinations, even though sustained use of these insecticides would probably lead quickly to the development of resistance.
    • Crop Water Use Estimates

      Watson, J.; Sheedy, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Irrigation scheduling, by keeping track of irrigation applications, soil storage and crop water use, has been computerized by a number of different individuals. A key component of the computerized methods is the estimation of a reference crop evapotranspiration rate. Complaints about one such method, AZSCHED, led the authors to compare the reference crop evapotranspiration values calculated by AZSCHED with those calculated by a second procedure available used by AZMET. Results of the comparison indicated that no significant difference existed between methods, for either a traditionally "long season", or a contemporary "short season" growing period. AZSCHED did estimate crop water use to be about 5% - 8% more than AZMET, an amount that is not of importance considering the irrigation inefficiencies created by field non-uniformities. Experience by the authors indicates that inappropriate selection of irrigation efficiencies and/or soil water holding capacity may be the main cause of user complaints.
    • Defoliation of Pima and Upland Cotton at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Odom, P. N.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Experiments were effected on both Pima and upland cotton to compare the defoliation effects of different rates of Ginstar, Ginstar + Prep and sodium chlorate with an untreated check. Weather conditions after treatment applications were recorded and observations taken after one week and two weeks. Grab samples were taken from the picker to determine percent trash and to run HVI analyses.
    • Irrigation Efficiencies and Lint Yields of Upland Cotton Grown at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1994

      Sheedy, Mike; Watson, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A field trial was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to observe the effects of four irrigation efficiencies (65 %, 75 %, 85 %, and 95 %) on the lint yield produced from two upland cotton varieties (DP 5415 and DP 5816). Nitrogen requirements for the crop were determined using pre -season soil samples and in-season petiole samples with data collected from crop monitoring at weekly intervals. AZSCHED was used as a guide to the irrigation timing and amount of water applied during the season. The irrigation efficiency did not have an effect on the lint yield of the cotton crop regardless of variety, but there was a significant difference in yield between the varieties. Lint yields ranged from 1165 #/acre to 1299 #/acre for DP 5415 and 869 #/acre to 986 #/acre for DP 5816.
    • Determining Soil Moisture for Irrigation Management

      Martin, E. C.; Husman, S.; Wegener, R.; Brown, P.; Johnson, K.; Schnakenberg, L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      One key component in good irrigation management is the measurement of soil moisture to help determine when to irrigate. In this study, resistance blocks and tensiometers were compared to neutron probe readings to assess how well these devices followed soil moisture and whether the resistance blocks and /or tensiometers could be used to schedule irrigation in cotton production. The resistance blocks were placed at 6, 18, and 30 inches. Tensiometers were placed at 18 and 30 inches. The readings from the resistance blocks and tensiometers were compared to neutron probe readings taken at 6, 18, and 30 inches. The resistance blocks compared well with the neutron probe readings at the 6 inch and 30 inch depth. At the 18 inch depth, there was much scatter in the data. The tensiometers also showed good comparisons at 30 inches and poor comparisons at 18 inches.
    • Host Preference of Silverleaf Whitefly and Factors Associated with Feeding Site Preference

      Chu, C. C.; Hennberry, T. J.; Cohen, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii, Bellows and Perring, preferred cantaloupe to cotton, broccoli and lettuce in field and greenhouse studies. In the absence of cantaloupe, SLW preferred cotton to broccoli and lettuce. In the field, more eggs and fewer nymphs were found on broccoli than on cotton. Differences in the relative abundance of vascular bundles per unit of leaf area between the four plant species may partly account for differences in oviposition site selection. Vascular bundle volume/unit of leaf tissue volume was 50% greater in cantaloupe than in cotton and broccoli, which in turn were significantly greater than in lettuce. Most SLW on cotton leaves are found on underside leaf surfaces. Distances from top and underside leaf surfaces to the nearest vascular bundles in cotton leaves were 131 and 60 tun, respectively, in the present studies.
    • Defoliation Research on Upland and Pima Cotton at the Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1994

      Nelson, J. M.; Hart, G. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Field studies were conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to evaluate the effectiveness of selected defoliation treatments on Pima and upland cotton under warm and cool weather conditions. Air temperatures were high for tests conducted on 16 and 22 September and cool for tests conducted on 14 October. In September tests, Pima cotton was more susceptible to leaf desiccation after applications of defoliants than upland cotton. Single applications of Ginstar or Dropp + Def gave good defoliation in September tests. In October, Pima cotton was effectively defoliated by chemical treatments but a single application of defoliants did not provide acceptable defoliation of upland cotton.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstations, Graham County, 1994

      Clark, Lee J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two on farm, replicated short staple variety demonstrations were established in 1994. Fifteen varieties were evaluated on the Layton farm in Thatcher and eighteen varieties were evaluated on the Colvin farm in Eden. Several new varieties were planted in both studies. Stoneville 324 and HS 46 were the highest yielding varieties with yields of 1060 and 975 pounds of lint per acre at the Thatcher and Eden locations, respectively.
    • Cotton Defoliation Evaluations, 1993

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two field experiments were carried out in representative cotton producing areas of Arizona to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of defoliation treatments on Pima cotton. These experiments were conducted at Coolidge and Marana. The treatments employed principally consisted of relatively new materials available in Arizona, and were compared to current standard treatments. All treatments showed promise in terms of effectiveness and the results provide a basis for use recommendations in 1995.
    • Nitrogen Management BMPs Parker Valley Demonstration

      Watson, J.; Winans, S.; Sheedy, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A nitrogen management demonstration was conducted in the Parker Valley in 1994. Grower nitrogen application practices were compared with nitrogen application recommendations based upon pre plant soil samples plus petiole nitrates and plant mapping data. The only significant difference in amounts applied occurred in May, with grower applied rates exceeding recommended rates. Grower rationale for the application was logical, however, it being dependent upon the uncertainty of irrigation timing in June.