• Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1994

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Nine short staple cotton varieties including five New Mexico acalas, four California acalas were tested in the 1994 variety study. The highest yielding variety was 1517-91 with a lint yield of 1009 pounds per acre. The average yield was nearly 200 pounds per acre higher than the previous three years. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, plant heights, height to node ratios and plant populations are shown. A lint yield comparison for 1991, 1993 and 1994 is included in this paper.
    • Upland Cotton Water Stress Sensitivity by Maturity Class and Suggesting Management Strategy

      Husman, S.; Wegener, R.; Brown, P.; Martin, E.; Johnson, K.; Schnakenberg, L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Lint yield response to differing irrigation treatments based on maximum allowable soil moisture depletions was tested in an indeterminate (D +PL 5816) and a determinate variety (D+PL 5415) selection. The Arizona Meteorological Weather Network (AzMet) was used to summate evapotranspiration demands with irrigations triggered at 35 (wet), 50 (med), and 65 % (dry) maximum allowable soil moisture depletion levels. Soil water holding capacity was gravimetrically measured to a depth of four feet on one foot increments. The study consisted of three treatments replicated four times utilizing a complete block split plot design. When the allowable depletion level was attained, the water volume necessary to refill the effective root zone was delivered. This was accomplished by manipulating irrigation set times and flow rates. Irrigation volumes were 66.7, 57.2, and 46.9 acre - inches for the wet, medium, and dry treatments respectively. Lint yields were significantly reduced when the maximum allowable soil moisture depletion exceeded 50% in the determinate variety selection while there were no significant lint yield differences in any of the irrigation treatments with the more indeterminate variety. Water stress sensitivity is increased with the determinate variety while the indeterminate variety is more forgiving. With variety selection shifts in the Central Arizona desert towards a reduced season approach and utilization of more determinate varieties, water management strategy should be modified to minimize or eliminate any water stress during the flowering period. The AzMet weather network information offers cost effective (free) and reliable water use information. The system can be used to assist with irrigation scheduling if a producer is willing to attempt to characterize differing soil water holding capacities on the farm and manage accordingly.
    • Cotton Leaf Curl Virus, A Threat to Arizona Cotton?

      Nadeem, Athar, 1955-; Xiong, Zhongguo; Nelson, Merritt; Silvertooth, Jeff; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A serious virus disease of cotton in Pakistan is distantly related to cotton leaf crumple in Arizona. It is much more destructive on cotton than leaf crumple, and has never been found in the western hemisphere. Cotton leaf crumple in Arizona causes only modestly damaging midseason infections, while leaf curl, has had a major impact on the crop in Pakistan. Modern transportation and the increasing movement of living plants in global trade has resulted in them recent introduction of a similar disease of another crop to the western hemisphere.
    • Evaluation of Late Season Pix™ Applications

      Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The effects of late -season Palm on the growth characteristics and yield of Upland cotton was examined in this study. Three treatments were imposed late-season (3447 HUAP), 1, a check plot, receiving no Pix™, 2 receiving 0.75 pt/acre, and 3; receiving 1 pt/acre. The imposed treatments did not have a statistically significant effect on plant growth characteristics or earliness nor were there any significant overall yield differences detected among treatments.
    • 1994 Weather Conditions

      Brown, P.; Russell, B.; Silvertooth, J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The 1994 cotton production season began with near optimal weather conditions. Temperatures and precipitation during planting and early vegetative growth were near optimal levels and were generally near normal. Summer brought an extended period of high day and night temperatures which began in June and continued through September at most locations. The period of high temperature associated with the monsoon (July and August) coincided with a rapid decline in fruit retention across much of the state. While the monsoon provided the usual rise in night temperature and humidity, summer rainfall was relatively light at most locations. Early fall weather was warm and dry, providing generally good conditions for finishing the crop. Weather conditions then cooled dramatically in the late fall prior to the onset of heavy rains in December. The wet December conditions limited post harvest field work in many locations.
    • Plant Growth Regulator Studies at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Methanol, Cytokin and PGR IV plant growth regulators were tested on long and short staple cotton on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1994. It was a follow up study on Methanol and Cytokin and a first time look at PGR IV.
    • Cotton Defoliation Evaluations, 1993

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two field experiments were carried out in representative cotton producing areas of Arizona to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of defoliation treatments on Pima cotton. These experiments were conducted at Coolidge and Marana. The treatments employed principally consisted of relatively new materials available in Arizona, and were compared to current standard treatments. All treatments showed promise in terms of effectiveness and the results provide a basis for use recommendations in 1995.
    • Determining Soil Moisture for Irrigation Management

      Martin, E. C.; Husman, S.; Wegener, R.; Brown, P.; Johnson, K.; Schnakenberg, L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      One key component in good irrigation management is the measurement of soil moisture to help determine when to irrigate. In this study, resistance blocks and tensiometers were compared to neutron probe readings to assess how well these devices followed soil moisture and whether the resistance blocks and /or tensiometers could be used to schedule irrigation in cotton production. The resistance blocks were placed at 6, 18, and 30 inches. Tensiometers were placed at 18 and 30 inches. The readings from the resistance blocks and tensiometers were compared to neutron probe readings taken at 6, 18, and 30 inches. The resistance blocks compared well with the neutron probe readings at the 6 inch and 30 inch depth. At the 18 inch depth, there was much scatter in the data. The tensiometers also showed good comparisons at 30 inches and poor comparisons at 18 inches.
    • Pima Cotton Regional Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Ten long staple varieties (including two Pima experimental lines) were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in Graham county at an elevation of 2950 feet. Even though the total number of heat units received during the season was nearly as high as the previous year, the average yield was nearly 300 pounds per acre lower. Olvey and Associates OA 304 was the highest yielding variety with a yield of 776 pounds per acre of lint and only two varieties broke the bale and a half mark. Yield and other agronomic data as well as fiber quality data are contained in this paper.
    • Evaluation of a Feedback Approach to Nitrogen and Pix Application

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A single field experiment was conducted in 1994 at Maricopa, AZ to compare a scheduled approach (based on stage of growth) versus a feedback approach (based on vegetative status) to both nitrogen (N) and mepiquat chloride (PIX™) applications on Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). PIX feedback treatments were based upon fruit retention (FR) levels and height: node ratios (HNRs) according to established baselines. Scheduled PIX applications were made for a total of 1.0 pt./acre over two applications, with feedback PIX treatments receiving a single 0.5 pt./acre application near peak bloom (approx. 2200 heat units after planting (HUAP), 86/55 °F threshold) Scheduled applications of fertilizer N totaled 225 lbs. N/acre from four applications and feedback N treatments received a total of 135 lbs. N/acre from three 45 lb. N/acre applications. Treatments consisted of all combinations of scheduled or feedback applications of both N and PIX. The highest lint yields were from a treatment receiving feedback N and PIX and a treatment receiving scheduled N and PIX, which were not significantly differencent (P ≤ 0.05) from one another. From a practical standpoint, however, these treatments were very different in terms of the magnitude in differences of fertilizer N and PIX required to produce comparable yields.
    • Host Preference of Silverleaf Whitefly and Factors Associated with Feeding Site Preference

      Chu, C. C.; Hennberry, T. J.; Cohen, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii, Bellows and Perring, preferred cantaloupe to cotton, broccoli and lettuce in field and greenhouse studies. In the absence of cantaloupe, SLW preferred cotton to broccoli and lettuce. In the field, more eggs and fewer nymphs were found on broccoli than on cotton. Differences in the relative abundance of vascular bundles per unit of leaf area between the four plant species may partly account for differences in oviposition site selection. Vascular bundle volume/unit of leaf tissue volume was 50% greater in cantaloupe than in cotton and broccoli, which in turn were significantly greater than in lettuce. Most SLW on cotton leaves are found on underside leaf surfaces. Distances from top and underside leaf surfaces to the nearest vascular bundles in cotton leaves were 131 and 60 tun, respectively, in the present studies.
    • Evaluation of a Leaf-turn Method for Sampling Whiteflies in Cotton

      Diehl, J. W.; Ellsworth, P. C.; Naranjo, S. E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Plans for sampling sweetpotato whiteflies in cotton were evaluated within 8,000 acres of cotton within central Arizona. These plans were found to be a practical and efficient way to track whitefly populations. In general they should add about 8 minutes to a pest sampling regime. Neither time of day nor sampler experience were found to have a significant effect on the number of whiteflies counted. Therefore, this method provides a common currency for growers, PCAs and others to compare whitefly numbers among fields and through time.
    • Bioassay Results in Field Persistence of Two Pink Bollworm Parasitic Nematodes

      Lindegren, J. E.; Henneberry, T. J.; Forlow Jech, L. J.; Burke, R. A.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, HCRL, Fresno, CA; USDA-ARS, WCRL, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and S. riobravis Cabanillas, Poinar and Raulston applied in the field at the rate of 1 billion nematodes /acre equivalent persisted in the soil for 63 and 6 days, respectively. Persistence of S. riobravis in the field may offer the potential for introduction and permanent establishment of this nematode for pink bollworm (PBW), Pectinophora gossvpiella (Saunders), control in southwestern cotton growing areas.
    • Nitrogen Management Experiments for Upland and Pima Cotton, 1994

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Unruh, B. L.; Navarro, J. A.; Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Three field experiments were conducted in Arizona in 1994 at three locations ( Maricopa, Marana, and Safford). The Maricopa and Safford experiments have been conducted for six consecutive seasons, with consistent plot locations; the Marana site was initiated in 1994. The purposes of the experiments were to validate and refine nitrogen (N) fertilization recommendations for both Upland and Pima cotton. The experiments each utilized N management tools such as pre-season soil tests for NO₃⁻-N, in-season plant tissue testing (petioles) for N fertility status, and crop monitoring to ascertain crop fruiting patterns and crop N needs. Results at each location revealed a strong relationship between the crop fruit retention levels and N needs for the crop. This pattern was further reflected in final yield analysis as a response to the N fertilization regimes used. The effects of N fertility levels have been consistently evident in crop maturity and its relationship to lint yields.
    • 1994 Low Desert Upland Cotton Advanced Strains Testing Program

      Husman, S. H.; Jech, L. E.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Forty eight , non -commercially available advanced strains cotton varieties were tested in 1994 on a commercial farm in Gila Bend, AZ. D &PL 5415 and Sure Grow 501 were included as commercial checks for comparison purposes. Ten participating cotton seed breeding companies entered five lines each of materials which were felt to show promise for potential commercialization. Lines were specifically chosen for their potential for yield performance under low desert environmental conditions. Each plot was six rows wide by 38 feet long replicated four times. The test was planted on April 1, 1994 and harvested on November 17 and November 29, 1994 for both the first and second pick respectively.
    • Short Staple Regional Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Fifty five short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Germain's GC 9033, a variety with the same apparent maturity as DP 90 was the top variety for seedcotton yield but came in third place in lint yield behind two varieties from Australia. Average yields were about 200 lbs per acre lower than 1993, which were about 200 pounds per acre lower than in 1992. HW data for the varieties in the trial are included in this report.
    • Pima Cotton Genetics

      Percy, R. G.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A short season feasibility study, using early maturing Pinta genotypes was conducted for a second season. Four early maturing genotypes, a short season check (P62) and a full season check variety (PS-7) were evaluated in replicated tests under short season and full season regimes. In both 1993 and 1994, most genotypes reached cutout around August 4, with 2759 accumulated heat units. All genotypes were earlier maturing than PS-7, as indicated by plant growth measurements and by sequential harvests. In 1994, the four early maturing experimental genotypes produced yields equal to or slightly better than the longer season cultivar PS-7. No differences in yield occurred between the short season and standard practice management systems in either year. A fiber improvement project was initiated in 1989 with the primary goals of increasing the fiber length and strength potential of Pima cotton. In 1989 the early maturing, short statured Pima strain P62 was crossed to Giza 45 and Giza 70 to transfer the fiber strength of those varieties into a heat tolerant, earlier maturing, productive Pima background. Likewise, P62 was crossed to the Sea Island cultivar St. Vincent V-135 with the objective of transferring the latter cultivar's long fiber length into an agronomic Pima background. Two resulting lines, one possessing high fiber strength and the other possessing high fiber length are planned for release in 1995-96.
    • 1993 Parker Valley & Mohave Valley Short Staple Cotton Variety Trial

      Hood, L. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two short staple cotton variety trials were conducted in the Colorado River Basin. One trial was located in the Parker Valley and one in the Mohave Valley. Ten varieties from various seed companies were entered in each test. Yields varied considerably among varieties and locations. However, these trials among others provides evidence that current variety choices are viable components of Arizona cotton production.
    • Comparative Analysis of Two Sampling Methods for Estimating Abundance of Adult Bemisia tabaci in Cotton

      Naranjo, S. E.; Flint, H. M.; Henneberry, T. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The leaf turn method and the black pan method, two sampling methods for estimating the abundance of Bemisia tabaci (Strain B) on cotton, were compared over a two year period in Maricopa and Phoenix, AZ Both methods were highly correlated with the density of immature stages prior to the use of insecticides, but more poorly correlated after insecticide use began. The two methods were highly correlated with one another, however, leaf turn counts were better predictors of immature infestation. The leaf turn method was also much less variable between individual samplers than the black pan method. Finally, in terms of cost-efficiency it takes, on average, 71% less time to estimate population density with an acceptable precision using the leaf turn method. Based on these criteria, the leaf turn method is a more reliable and efficient technique for estimating adult abundance.
    • Upland Advance Strains Cotton Variety Test at the Maricopa Agricultural Center

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Thirty -six upland cotton advance strains were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant population and fiber property data are presented in this report.