• Host Preference of Silverleaf Whitefly and Factors Associated with Feeding Site Preference

      Chu, C. C.; Hennberry, T. J.; Cohen, A. C.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Silverleaf whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii, Bellows and Perring, preferred cantaloupe to cotton, broccoli and lettuce in field and greenhouse studies. In the absence of cantaloupe, SLW preferred cotton to broccoli and lettuce. In the field, more eggs and fewer nymphs were found on broccoli than on cotton. Differences in the relative abundance of vascular bundles per unit of leaf area between the four plant species may partly account for differences in oviposition site selection. Vascular bundle volume/unit of leaf tissue volume was 50% greater in cantaloupe than in cotton and broccoli, which in turn were significantly greater than in lettuce. Most SLW on cotton leaves are found on underside leaf surfaces. Distances from top and underside leaf surfaces to the nearest vascular bundles in cotton leaves were 131 and 60 tun, respectively, in the present studies.
    • The Interaction and Effects of Soil Moisture Regime and Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) Density on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Growth

      Moffett, Jody E.; McCloskey, William B.; Husman, Stephen H.; Dixon, Gary L.; Silvertooth, Jeff; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The goal of our research is to determine the effects of yellow nutsedge competition on cotton and to examine how the competitive relationship between these two species is modulated by soil moisture. In support of this goal, a competition experiment with various nutsedge densities and three irrigation regimes was conducted at the University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center. The results of this study indicate that increasing nutsedge density caused a significant linear decrease in cotton seed yield in both 1993 (p=0.03) and 1994 (p=0.002). The cotton yield reductions caused by the highest nutsedge densities, 33 and 50 tubers /m of crop row in 1993 and 1994, respectively, were 13.5 and 15.5 percent, respectively. Stem biomass, an indicator of total above ground biomass, increased significantly with increasing soil moisture. There was also a trend of increasing seed cotton yield with increasing soil moisture with the wet treatment (i.e., irrigation at 35 percent soil moisture depletion) resulting in the highest biomass and yields. In 1994 this trend was significant (p=0.0001) but in 1993 it was not (p=0.098) probably because fewer replications were used in 1993. An important goal of this research was to determine if cotton, with its deeper tap root type of root architecture, is more competitive against yellow nutsedge, which has a fibrous root system, when irrigation is less frequent. However, analysis of variance showed that there was no significant interaction between soil moisture availability and seed cotton yield reductions caused by nutsedge competition in either 1993 (p=0.44) or 1994 (p=0.62).
    • Irrigation Efficiencies and Lint Yields of Upland Cotton Grown at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1994

      Sheedy, Mike; Watson, Jack; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A field trial was conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to observe the effects of four irrigation efficiencies (65 %, 75 %, 85 %, and 95 %) on the lint yield produced from two upland cotton varieties (DP 5415 and DP 5816). Nitrogen requirements for the crop were determined using pre -season soil samples and in-season petiole samples with data collected from crop monitoring at weekly intervals. AZSCHED was used as a guide to the irrigation timing and amount of water applied during the season. The irrigation efficiency did not have an effect on the lint yield of the cotton crop regardless of variety, but there was a significant difference in yield between the varieties. Lint yields ranged from 1165 #/acre to 1299 #/acre for DP 5415 and 869 #/acre to 986 #/acre for DP 5816.
    • Irrigation Frequency and Cotton Yield in Short-Season Cotton Systems

      Chu, Chang-chi; Henneberry, Thomas J.; Silvertooth, Jeff; USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      We tested the hypothesis that small frequent irrigations during the July cotton peak fruiting stage would result in better fruiting and higher cotton yields than the same amount of water applied less frequently. Over three years under a short - season production system, irrigation intervals of every 5-d with 42 mm of water applied at each irrigation increased cotton lint yield by 5-11 % compared to irrigation intervals of 10- and 15-d with 80 and 130 mm of water applied at each irrigation, respectively. The results show that small, frequent furrow irrigations during cotton fruiting are highly effective in reducing water deficit during critical growth stages and improved lint production in a short - season cultural system. Soil salt content in the top 15 cm of soil was not increased after three years of study.
    • Multiple Plant Growth Regulator Use on Short Staple Cotton

      Hood, L. R.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A field trial was conducted during the 1992 & 1993 growing seasons to evaluate the activity of Cytokin and Pic applied alone or in combination to short staple cotton. The Cytokin treatment significantly increased tint yield over the other treatments in 1992. There were no statistically significant seed cotton differences between the non - treated check and any treatment in 1993. Fruit retention remained high throughout 1992 and very high throughout the 1993 season. Under high fruiting conditions, use of a plant growth regulator would not normally be recommended.
    • Nitrogen Management BMPs Parker Valley Demonstration

      Watson, J.; Winans, S.; Sheedy, M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A nitrogen management demonstration was conducted in the Parker Valley in 1994. Grower nitrogen application practices were compared with nitrogen application recommendations based upon pre plant soil samples plus petiole nitrates and plant mapping data. The only significant difference in amounts applied occurred in May, with grower applied rates exceeding recommended rates. Grower rationale for the application was logical, however, it being dependent upon the uncertainty of irrigation timing in June.
    • Nitrogen Management Experiments for Upland and Pima Cotton, 1994

      Silvertooth, J. C.; Norton, E. R.; Unruh, B. L.; Navarro, J. A.; Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Three field experiments were conducted in Arizona in 1994 at three locations ( Maricopa, Marana, and Safford). The Maricopa and Safford experiments have been conducted for six consecutive seasons, with consistent plot locations; the Marana site was initiated in 1994. The purposes of the experiments were to validate and refine nitrogen (N) fertilization recommendations for both Upland and Pima cotton. The experiments each utilized N management tools such as pre-season soil tests for NO₃⁻-N, in-season plant tissue testing (petioles) for N fertility status, and crop monitoring to ascertain crop fruiting patterns and crop N needs. Results at each location revealed a strong relationship between the crop fruit retention levels and N needs for the crop. This pattern was further reflected in final yield analysis as a response to the N fertilization regimes used. The effects of N fertility levels have been consistently evident in crop maturity and its relationship to lint yields.
    • Pima Cotton Genetics

      Percy, R. G.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      A short season feasibility study, using early maturing Pinta genotypes was conducted for a second season. Four early maturing genotypes, a short season check (P62) and a full season check variety (PS-7) were evaluated in replicated tests under short season and full season regimes. In both 1993 and 1994, most genotypes reached cutout around August 4, with 2759 accumulated heat units. All genotypes were earlier maturing than PS-7, as indicated by plant growth measurements and by sequential harvests. In 1994, the four early maturing experimental genotypes produced yields equal to or slightly better than the longer season cultivar PS-7. No differences in yield occurred between the short season and standard practice management systems in either year. A fiber improvement project was initiated in 1989 with the primary goals of increasing the fiber length and strength potential of Pima cotton. In 1989 the early maturing, short statured Pima strain P62 was crossed to Giza 45 and Giza 70 to transfer the fiber strength of those varieties into a heat tolerant, earlier maturing, productive Pima background. Likewise, P62 was crossed to the Sea Island cultivar St. Vincent V-135 with the objective of transferring the latter cultivar's long fiber length into an agronomic Pima background. Two resulting lines, one possessing high fiber strength and the other possessing high fiber length are planned for release in 1995-96.
    • Pima Cotton Improvement

      Moser, H. S.; Percy, R. G.; Ray, I. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of five experimental lines (P73, P75, P76, P80, and P81) with two commercial varieties ('Pima S-6' and 'Pima S-79 of Pima cotton. All seven strains were grown in replicated strip tests at four locations across the Pima belt in 1994. While none of the experimental lines produced significantly more lint than the best Pima variety at any site, some of them possess traits that are valuable to Pima cotton breeders. P73 has long and strong fiber. P76 is a high yielding, early maturing line that produces long and strong fiber. P80's lint yields are similar to Pima S-7, but it is significantly earlier.
    • Pima Cotton Regional Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Ten long staple varieties (including two Pima experimental lines) were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in Graham county at an elevation of 2950 feet. Even though the total number of heat units received during the season was nearly as high as the previous year, the average yield was nearly 300 pounds per acre lower. Olvey and Associates OA 304 was the highest yielding variety with a yield of 776 pounds per acre of lint and only two varieties broke the bale and a half mark. Yield and other agronomic data as well as fiber quality data are contained in this paper.
    • Pima Regional Variety Test; Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1994

      Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Clark, L. J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Nine Pima varieties and experimental strains were grown in a replicated trial at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Lint yield, boll size, lint percent, plant population and fiber property data are presented in this report.
    • Plant Growth Regulator Studies at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Methanol, Cytokin and PGR IV plant growth regulators were tested on long and short staple cotton on the Safford Agricultural Center in 1994. It was a follow up study on Methanol and Cytokin and a first time look at PGR IV.
    • Plant Population Evaluation for Upland Cotton

      Norton, E. R.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Stedman, S. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Plant population management is an important aspect of cotton production. Recommendations for optimum plant densities range from 25,000 - 45,000 plants per acre (ppa). A study was conducted in Pinal county in 1994 to evaluate the recommendations already given. Plant densities for this study ranged from approximately 18,000 - 65,000. Yields increased with populations of 18,000, 28,000, and 39,000 ppa. For populations of 43,000 and 65,000 ppa a corresponding decrease in yield from 39,000 ppa was observed. This study serves to reconfirm the recommendations for optimum plant densities.
    • Practical Considerations of Precision Guidance and Weed Control in Cotton

      Thacker, Gary W.; Coates, Wayne E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      This paper offers practical advice to growers interested in precision guidance technologies. Various types of guidance systems are described, along with their potential applications and benefits in a farming operation. Also discussed are some of the techniques which can be employed with precision guidance, including mechanical removal of weeds in the row, improved nutsedge control, and precision herbicide applications.
    • Precision Guidance Techniques to Reduce Weed Competition and Production Costs in Cotton

      Thacker, Gary W.; Coates, Wayne E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      The objective of this project is to evaluate the benefits of precision guidance systems as a means of using tillage to kill weeds, and to confine herbicide applications to narrow bands. In cotton, a precision guided close cultivation with a directed spray of MSMA significantly reduced a purple nutsedge stand early on. However this reduction was not significant by the end of the season. For controlling woolly morningglory, the use of a precision guided cultivator equipped with in -row weeding devices resulted in much lower numbers of morningglory weeds, although the differences were not significant at the 95% confidence level. The guidance system kept the implement precisely aligned to the drill rows at a higher speed than was possible with the cooperator's non - precision cultivator. This higher productivity more than offsets the cost of the guidance system and the in-row weeding devices.
    • Short Staple Cotton Advanced Strains Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Twenty six short staple advanced strains/varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. SureGrow SGX247 was the highest yielding cultivar in the trial with a lint yield of 1628 pounds per acre. The exciting feature of this trial is that the top two swains exceeded the highest yield in the Regional variety trial by 100 to 150 pounds of lint. This is the first time that so many advanced strains were tested in a given year. The site at Safford gives cotton breeders an insight as to how their advanced strains or new varieties will perform in the high deserts of Arizona and New Mexico. HVI data for the varieties in the trial indicate that the average fiber length was greater than 1.11 inches and the average fiber strength was greater than 30 grams/tex.
    • Short Staple Regional Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Hart, G. L.; Nelson, J. M.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Fifty five short staple varieties were grown in a replicated field trial on the Safford Agricultural Center. Germain's GC 9033, a variety with the same apparent maturity as DP 90 was the top variety for seedcotton yield but came in third place in lint yield behind two varieties from Australia. Average yields were about 200 lbs per acre lower than 1993, which were about 200 pounds per acre lower than in 1992. HW data for the varieties in the trial are included in this report.
    • Short Staple Variety Demonstations, Graham County, 1994

      Clark, Lee J.; Cluff, Ronald E.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Two on farm, replicated short staple variety demonstrations were established in 1994. Fifteen varieties were evaluated on the Layton farm in Thatcher and eighteen varieties were evaluated on the Colvin farm in Eden. Several new varieties were planted in both studies. Stoneville 324 and HS 46 were the highest yielding varieties with yields of 1060 and 975 pounds of lint per acre at the Thatcher and Eden locations, respectively.
    • Short Staple Variety Trial, Greenlee County, 1994

      Clark, Lee J.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Nine short staple cotton varieties including five New Mexico acalas, four California acalas were tested in the 1994 variety study. The highest yielding variety was 1517-91 with a lint yield of 1009 pounds per acre. The average yield was nearly 200 pounds per acre higher than the previous three years. In addition to lint yields; percent lint, plant heights, height to node ratios and plant populations are shown. A lint yield comparison for 1991, 1993 and 1994 is included in this paper.
    • Short Staple Variety Trials in Cochise County, 1994

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Silvertooth, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-03)
      Variety trials were grown at two locations and with two different sets of short staple varieties. One dial on the Robbs farm, north of Kansas Settlement, tested eight acolas varieties from New Mexico and California. The other trial on the Curry farm, southwest of Kansas Settlement and north of Sunsites, tested twelve upland varieties as part of the statewide testing program. The latter trial was grown under drip irrigation. Yields were exceptionally high at these high elevation trials due to the record breaking heat experienced during the summer. Top yielding varieties were Prema in the acala trial and DP 5409 in the upland trial with lint yields of 892 and 1791 pounds per acre, respectively.