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dc.contributor.advisorVenable, D. Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorst, Jonathan Lamar
dc.creatorHorst, Jonathan Lamaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-17T21:15:30Z
dc.date.available2012-01-17T21:15:30Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/203503
dc.description.abstractPositive frequency-dependent predation (FDP) has been proposed as a species coexistence mechanism and theoretical models have shown how it may function. In positive FDP a rare species receives a temporary reprieve from predation pressure allowing an increase to its population growth rate and a chance for it to recover from rarity. This study tests for frequency-dependent foraging by granivorous desert rodents on the seeds of three species of winter annual plants that grow in the Sonoran Desert. While the preference for one species is much higher than the other two, preferences for each species are higher when common than when rare showing an asymmetric form of positive FDP. This study is the first empirical test for positive FDP on winter annual plants and by granivorous desert rodents and one of few to use more than two prey species, native prey species, or asymmetrically preferred prey species.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectseed predationen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectwinter annual plantsen_US
dc.subjectEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subjectfrequency dependenceen_US
dc.subjectrodentsen_US
dc.titleFREQUENCY DEPENDENT PREDATION ON WINTER ANNUAL SEEDS BY GRANIVOROUS RODENTSen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPrice, Mary V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChesson, Peteren_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T19:24:33Z
html.description.abstractPositive frequency-dependent predation (FDP) has been proposed as a species coexistence mechanism and theoretical models have shown how it may function. In positive FDP a rare species receives a temporary reprieve from predation pressure allowing an increase to its population growth rate and a chance for it to recover from rarity. This study tests for frequency-dependent foraging by granivorous desert rodents on the seeds of three species of winter annual plants that grow in the Sonoran Desert. While the preference for one species is much higher than the other two, preferences for each species are higher when common than when rare showing an asymmetric form of positive FDP. This study is the first empirical test for positive FDP on winter annual plants and by granivorous desert rodents and one of few to use more than two prey species, native prey species, or asymmetrically preferred prey species.


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