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dc.contributor.authorEl-Lissy, O.*
dc.contributor.authorAntilla, L.*
dc.contributor.authorStaten, R. T.*
dc.contributor.authorLeggett, J. E.*
dc.contributor.authorWalters, M.*
dc.contributor.editorSilvertooth, Jeffen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-06T18:28:20Z
dc.date.available2012-02-06T18:28:20Z
dc.date.issued1994-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/209641
dc.description.abstractA large scale for the control of sweetpotato (silverleaf) whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, (SPW) was carried out in Paloma and Painted Rock near Gila Bend, Arizona, on approximately 6,156 ha of cotton during the 1993 season. Within the program area 40 fields were randomly selected for comparison with 15 fields in each of 2 locations outside the program. They were identified as check east (approximately 11 k northeast of the program) and check west (approximately 3 k west of the program). Whitefly populations in both check areas were controlled according to individual grower protocol. On a weekly basis, adult counts were taken from all 4 edges and the centers of each field using the oil pan technique. Insecticides were applied aerially in the program area on the full field or edges based on population density recorded from pan samples. Insecticide combinations were rotated weekly in an attempt to reduce the potential for the development of pesticide resistance. During the 16 -week evaluation period SPW adults were significantly higher in check east and check west than the program area by 2- and 6-fold respectively; eggs were higher by 3- and 39 fold, respectively; and nymphs were also significantly higher in check east and check west by 3- and 60-fold respectively. Ginning records for 1993 indicate approximately a 20% increase in yield in the program area a 5% increase in check east and a 40% decrease in check west as compared to 1992. These results demonstrate that an area -wide approach, utilizing edge treatment where possible, based on extensive field sampling regimens represent an important integrated strategy in a successful whitefly control program.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370096en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-96en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.titleControl of Sweepotato (Silverleaf) Whitefly, Bemisia Tabaci, on Cotton in Paloma, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Cotton Research and Protection Council, Phoenix, AZen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Phoenix, AZen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA-ARS-Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZen_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T02:03:34Z
html.description.abstractA large scale for the control of sweetpotato (silverleaf) whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, (SPW) was carried out in Paloma and Painted Rock near Gila Bend, Arizona, on approximately 6,156 ha of cotton during the 1993 season. Within the program area 40 fields were randomly selected for comparison with 15 fields in each of 2 locations outside the program. They were identified as check east (approximately 11 k northeast of the program) and check west (approximately 3 k west of the program). Whitefly populations in both check areas were controlled according to individual grower protocol. On a weekly basis, adult counts were taken from all 4 edges and the centers of each field using the oil pan technique. Insecticides were applied aerially in the program area on the full field or edges based on population density recorded from pan samples. Insecticide combinations were rotated weekly in an attempt to reduce the potential for the development of pesticide resistance. During the 16 -week evaluation period SPW adults were significantly higher in check east and check west than the program area by 2- and 6-fold respectively; eggs were higher by 3- and 39 fold, respectively; and nymphs were also significantly higher in check east and check west by 3- and 60-fold respectively. Ginning records for 1993 indicate approximately a 20% increase in yield in the program area a 5% increase in check east and a 40% decrease in check west as compared to 1992. These results demonstrate that an area -wide approach, utilizing edge treatment where possible, based on extensive field sampling regimens represent an important integrated strategy in a successful whitefly control program.


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