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dc.contributor.authorUnruh, B. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, C. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, E. R.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSilvertooth, Jeffen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-09T17:25:35Z
dc.date.available2012-02-09T17:25:35Z
dc.date.issued1995-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/210327
dc.description.abstractAdvanced technologies to produce synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamide (PAS, and polymaleic anhydride (PMA) have produced products which may be economically feasible alternatives to traditional treatments such as gypsum in the desert Southwest. In 1994 three field studies were initiated, two identical studies were located in the Yuma Valley and one at Paloma Ranch. At Yuma Valley the experiments included 0, 1, and 2 tons gypsum/acre, over which, various soil-applied treatments were made; including, a check, soluble PMA (Sper Sal™), and PAM (Hydro-Growth™). Upland cotton 'DPL 5461' was grown in both Yuma Valley studies. At Paloma Ranch, Upland 'DPL 5415' planted. Prior to planting, two gypsum applications were made at 0 and 2 tons/acre. Also included as treatments were various methods and rates of Sper Salt™. No differences among treatments were detected in either of these locations relative to crop yield. At Paloma Ranch there were some early-season differences in soil crusting among the various soil amendment treatments, however, these differences dissipated as the season progressed and did not result in lint yield differences.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370099en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-99en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Soil fertilityen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Soil managementen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of Soil Conditioners and Water Treatments for Cotton Production Systemsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T05:16:34Z
html.description.abstractAdvanced technologies to produce synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamide (PAS, and polymaleic anhydride (PMA) have produced products which may be economically feasible alternatives to traditional treatments such as gypsum in the desert Southwest. In 1994 three field studies were initiated, two identical studies were located in the Yuma Valley and one at Paloma Ranch. At Yuma Valley the experiments included 0, 1, and 2 tons gypsum/acre, over which, various soil-applied treatments were made; including, a check, soluble PMA (Sper Sal™), and PAM (Hydro-Growth™). Upland cotton 'DPL 5461' was grown in both Yuma Valley studies. At Paloma Ranch, Upland 'DPL 5415' planted. Prior to planting, two gypsum applications were made at 0 and 2 tons/acre. Also included as treatments were various methods and rates of Sper Salt™. No differences among treatments were detected in either of these locations relative to crop yield. At Paloma Ranch there were some early-season differences in soil crusting among the various soil amendment treatments, however, these differences dissipated as the season progressed and did not result in lint yield differences.


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