• Cantaloupe Herbicide Weed Control Study

      Umeda, K.; Gal, G.; Strickland, B.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-02)
      Clomazone (Command®), bensulide (Prefar®), sulfentrazone, and halosulfuron treatments applied preemergence (PREE) provided very good control of prostrate pigweed (Amaranthus blitoides), lambsquarters (Chenopodium album), and common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) at better than 90% at 5 weeks after treatment (WAT). Halosulfuron was effective in controlling all weeds better than 90% at 7 WAT Carfentrazone was not effective against most of the weeds present in the test but appeared to be safe on cantaloupe. Postemergence (POST) treatments alone did not provide acceptable control of pigweeds but controlled lambsquarters and common purslane at 2 WAT. Halosulfuron and bentazon (Basagran®) applied POST following PREE treatments controlled most of the weeds better than 90% through 7 WAT. Cantaloupe yields were highest with good weed control provided by PREE treatments followed by POST herbicide applications. Basagran at 0.50 lb /A injured cantaloupe after applications but yields were not affected compared to the untreated check. Command, sulfentrazone, and halosulfuron caused cantaloupe injury after PREE applications. Basagran caused substantial crop injury after POST applications.
    • Comparison of New Fungicides for Management of Powdery Mildew of Cantaloupe in 1997

      Matheron, Michael E.; Porchas, Martin; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-02)
      Powdery mildew of cucurbits, which include cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon as well as cucumbers and squash, occurs every year in Arizona. Moderate temperatures and relative humidity, succulent plant growth and reduced light intensity are factors that favor the development of powdery mildew, which is caused by the pathogenic fungus Sphaerotheca fuliginea Potential new fungicides were evaluated and compared to existing chemicals for control of powdery mildew of cantaloupe in a field trial conducted in the spring of 1997 at the Yuma Agricultural Center. The top performer in this study for disease control as well as reduction in culled fruit was a combination of Topsin-M + Trilogy. Other effective materials included BAS 490, Quadris, Procure, Benlate, Microthiol Special and Rally. Bayleton significantly reduced the amount of culled fruit, but did not significantly reduce the severity of powdery mildew. Compared to nontreated plots, a gain of up to $973 per acre could have been realized due to the reduction in amount of culled fruit in plots treated with fungicides. The potential availability of new chemistries for management of powdery mildew of cantaloupe and other cucurbits could help in the implementation of fungicide resistance management strategies, which strive to minimize the risk of resistance development by the pathogen to these compounds.
    • Insecticides for Whitefly Control in Cantaloupe

      Umeda, K.; Gal, G.; Strickland, B.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-02)
      In small plot field testing, the new IGR's, buprofezine, pyriproxyfen, and fenoxycarb plus CGA-215944 , offered very good reduction of the WF adults and immature stages for several weeks. Combinations of the new insecticides and alternating weekly applications were effective in minimizing WF season-long. Pyrethroids, bifenthrin and esfenvalerate plus endosulfan treatments, were effective after early applications and nymph counts were elevated after the third application. Oxydemeton-methyl and imidacloprid treatments applied weekly compared favorably with the new chemistries to reduce adults and immatures. Pyridaben applied weekly reduced adult counts relative to the untreated check but immatures increased after the third application.
    • Leafminer Control in Cantaloupe

      Umeda, K.; Gal, G.; Strickland, B.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-02)
      In a small plot field test on cantaloupes, abamectin (Agri-mek®), cyromazine (Trigard®), spinosad (Success®), and pyriproxyfen (Knack®) demonstrated efficacy to reduce the number of mined leaves caused by leafminers (Liriomvza sativae and L. trifolii). Multiple applications of Agri-mek and Trigard resulted in melons having the fewest number of mined leaves. Success and Knack were effective in reducing the number of mined leaves relative to the untreated check. All of the treatments provided effective control of leafminers for 14 to 21 days after treatment. Success exhibited a rate response with the highest rate showing the fewest number of mined leaves compared to the lower rate.
    • Postemergence Weed Control in Cantaloupe Study

      Umeda, K.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-02)
      The postemergence (POST) herbicide treatments did not cause any crop stand reduction following applications. Bentazon (Basagran®) at 0.50 lb AI /A caused marginally acceptable injury on the cantaloupe leaves. At 2 weeks after treatment (WAT), the amount of injury decreased and cantaloupe treated with Basagran at 1.0 lb AI/A showed marginally acceptable injury symptoms. Halosulfuron (Monsanto) at 0.05 to 0.10 lb AI/A caused slightly more injury (10 to 17 %) with increasing rates. Basagran at 1.0 lb Al/A gave good control ( >90 %) of morningglory and was marginal in controlling morningglory at 0.75 lb AI/A Halosulfuron at 1 WAT was marginal in controlling morningglory but improved to give acceptable control at 2 WAT. Fewer and smaller plants were removed by hand-hoeing from Basagran and halosulfuron treated plots compared to the untreated check.