• Identifying Short-Range Migration by the Sweet Potato Whitefly

      Byrne, David N.; Palumbo, John C.; Orum, T. V.; Rathman, Robin J.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Populations of the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, have been shown to consist of both migratory and trivial flying morphs. The behavior of these forms as part of the process of short-range migration needed to be examined under field conditions. Insects were marked in a field of cantaloupes using fluorescent dust. During the first growing season traps, used to collect living whiteflies, were placed along 16 equally spaced transects (22.5° apart) radiating out from the field to a distance of up to 0.6 miles. Wind out of the northeast consistently carried migrating whiteflies to traps placed along transects in the southwestern quadrant because cold air drainages dictate wind direction during early morning hours. For this reason, during the second season traps were laid out in a rectangular grid extending 3 miles to the southwest of the marked field. If dispersal was entirely passive or wind directed patterns could be described using a diffusion model. Statistical examination of the data, however, demonstrate that the distribution on all days was patchy. Traps in the immediate vicinity of the marked field caught more whiteflies than the daily median. Large numbers were also collected from around the periphery of the grid. Whiteflies were far less prevalent in the grid's center. As a result, the distribution of captured whiteflies can be described as bimodal. These patterns confirm behavior observed in the laboratory, i.e., a portion of the population are trivial fliers that do not engage in migration and are consequently captured in traps near the field and a portion initially ignore vegetative cues and fly for a period of time before landing in distant traps. This second population comprises the second peak in the model that appeared 1.6 miles from the marked field. On a localized level, 1.6 miles seems to be how far whiteflies move in a day. Earlier studies indicate that whiteflies only fly one day.
    • Field Evaluation of Potential New Fungicides for Control of Sclerotinia Leaf Drop of Lettuce in 1994 and 1995

      Matheron, Michael E.; Misaghi, Iraj J.; Porchas, Martin; DeCianne, Dominic; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Leaf drop of lettuce is caused by the plant pathogenic fungi Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum. Cool and moist environmental conditions favor disease development. Potential new fungicides were evaluated in field trials for control of this disease in 1994 and 1995. In the 1994 trial, Fluazinam and Topsin M provided significant decrease of disease and significant increase inmarketable yield compared to no treatment in plots infested with Sclerotinia minor or S. sclerotiorum. In 1995, Fluazinam, Topsin M, and two compounds from Ciba significantly reduced disease caused by Sclerotinia minor and increased marketable yield of treated lettuce when compared to nontreated plots.
    • Efficacy of Biorational Insecticides to Beet Armyworm and Cabbage Looper on Iceberg Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Four tests were conducted evaluating biorational insecticides for control of beet armyworm (BAW) and cabbage looper (CL) on iceberg lettuce. Treatment means for BAW were difficult to separate due to low population densities. The new formulation of Javelin appeared to be the most efficacious Bt overall. However, when Bts were compared on a equal cost/A basis, there were no significant derences among products for CL control. All Bts were comparable to Lannate for CL control. The neem oil extract Align, provided adequate BAW and CL control, and its efficacy at low rates seemed to be slightly enhanced by the addition of Sunspray Ultrafine Oil. Larvin at lower than label recommended rates gave good BAW and CL control as did Javelin. The tank-mix of these two products did not enhance worm control over that of the products used alone. Mustang gave good control of CL but appeared to be slightly weak against BAW.
    • Field Evaluation of Potential New Fungicides for Control of Downy Mildew of Broccoli in 1994 and 1995

      Matheron, Michael E.; Porchas, Martin; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Downy mildew of broccoli is caused by the plant pathogenic fungus Peronospora parasitica. Cool damp weather with high humidity is highly favorable for sporulation, dissemination of spores, and infection by this pathogen. The severity of disease is affected by the duration of weather conditions favorable for disease development. Potential new fungicides were evaluated for disease control in field trials conducted during 1994 and 1995. Downy mildew did not occur in the 1994 trial. In 1995, disease was moderate and all tested fungicides provided significant disease control compared to no treatment at all. Three new fungicides, Fluazinam, Dimethomorph, and ICIA-5504, show promise as potential new materials for control of downy mildew on broccoli.
    • Admire® Insecticide Use and Influence on Cantaloupe Growth

      Umeda, K.; Fredman, C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Cantaloupe growth was influenced by using imidacloprid (Admire®) insecticide to control, suppress, or reduce whiteflies. The growth rate of cantaloupe was evaluated at regular intervals after crop emergence and a rate response was observed with greater growth with respect to increase in Admire® rate. Following at planting time applications, at 3 and 4 weeks after treatment (WAT) cantaloupe plants had more foliar growth and a greater number of leaves with increasing Admire® rate. At 5 to 8 WAT, cantaloupe vines exhibited greater growth with increasing rates of Admire®.
    • Evaluation of Admire Soil Treatments on Colonization of Green Peach Aphid and Marketability of Lettuce

      Palumbo, John; Kerns, David; Hannan, Todd; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Admire (imidacloprid), applied as a soil treatment, protected lettuce plants from developing infestations of green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), for 60-100 d after planting based on two small plot and two commercial field trials. Admire applied 7.6 cm sub-seed furrow provided longer and more consistent protection from green peach aphid than treatments applied to the soil surface, as a side-dress, or 15.2 cm sub-seed furrow. Surface band applications of Admire provided inconsistent control probably because of inadequate hydrological incorporation into the soil. In small plot trials, effective control of aphids by Admire applied 7.6 cm sub seed furrow resulted in greater than 90.0% marketable heads while the untreated plots contained 20.0% marketable heads. When used in a commercial setting, Admire applied 7.6 cm sub-seed furrow on leaf lettuce prevented aphid colonization (<3 aphids per plant) for approximately 100 d after planting, while the untreated and commercial standard treated areas contained 30.7 and 26.8 aphids per plant respectively at 100 d after planting. In addition, marketability of lettuce was greater in Admire treated plots. As a sub-seed furrow treatment, Admire provides a more suitable approach to aphid control than is currently available with foliar insecticides.
    • New Insecticides for Potential Use for Whitefly Control in Cantaloupes

      Umeda, K.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Most experimental treatments effectively reduced Bemisia tabaci [sweetpotato whitefly (WF) also known as silverleaf WF, B. argentifolii] adults and eggs in cantaloupes relative to the untreated check at 6 days after treatment of each of five applications. Acephate (Orthene®), buprofezin (Applaud®), bifenthrin (Capture®), endosulfan, fenpropathrin (Danitol®), naled (Dibrom®), and pymetrozine(CGA -215944, Ciba) treatments had the fewest adults and eggs. Insect growth regulator (IGR) materials in combinations, pyriproxyfen (S-71639, Valent) and fenoxycarb (Ciba),were more effective in reducing WF relative to the untreated check than when applied alone. Registered products, Dibrom®, endosulfan, and methamidaphos (Monitor®) were effective in combinations or in alternating applications.
    • Field Evaluation of Potential New Fungicides for Control of Powdery Mildew of Cantaloupe in 1994

      Matheron, Michael E.; Porchas, Martin; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Powdery mildew of cantaloupe in Arizona is caused by the plant pathogenic fungus Sphaerotheca fuliginea. The disease is found in melon fields each year; however, the incidence and severity of the disease is quite variable. Disease development is favored by low relative humidity, moderate temperatures, and succulent plant growth. Potential new fungicides were evaluated for disease control in a field trial conducted in the spring of 1994. In this study, Rally and Reach provided the highest level of disease control and highest percentages of marketable fruit when compared to untreated cantaloupe plants.
    • Soil-Applied Herbicides for Weed Control in Broccoli

      Umeda, K.; Gill, A.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Three commonly used herbicides for use in broccoli were effective when applied alone or in combinations as a preplant incorporated (PPI) or a preemergence (PE) application. DCPA (Dacthal®) at 10.0 lb product/A PE gave acceptable control of most weeds. Trifluralin (Treflan® SEC) at 1.0 pt/A and bensulide (Prefar® 4EC) PPI were also effective but mustard weeds were not adequately controlled. Combinations of the herbicides at lower rates did not provide any advantage in improving weed control efficacy.
    • Efficacy and Temporal Mortality of Selective Insecticides on Beet Armyworm Larvae in Lettuce

      Palumbo, J. C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
    • Broccoli Variety Trials 1994/1995

      Wilson, Mark; Oebker, Norman F.; The Barkley Company (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
    • Basal Crop Coefficients for Vegetables in Central Arizona

      Martin, E. C.; Slack, D. C.; Pegelow, E. J.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      The world supply of quality water for irrigation of crops is being depleted. Growers in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world, where irrigation is a requirement for crop production, are looking for ways to conserve their water use and increase their irrigation efficiency. One tool that has been useful in helping growers reduce their irrigation water inputs is computerized irrigation scheduling programs. This study is part of a joint project between the government of Egypt (National Agricultural Research Project), USA1D and The University of Arizona. Working together, researchers from Egypt and Arizona are developing water management tools that will help both countries better use their scarce water resources in arid environments. The main thrust of this segment of the project is to develop water use data on vegetables grown in both regions. These data will then be used to develop crop coefficient data to be used in AZSCHED, a computerized irrigation scheduling program developed at the University of Arizona. Using a subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system, carrots, cauliflower, head lettuce, and tomatoes were grown to determine water use patterns and develop basal crop coefficients. Water use data were collected using a neutron moisture gauge and a time domain reflectometer (TDR). Soil water data were collected 1 day following an irrigation and just prior to the next irrigation. Additionally, three different watering regimens were employed using available water content in the rootzone as a trigger to initiate irrigation (20 %, 30% and 40% depletion). The carrots, cauliflower and lettuce were planted in early October, 1993, using a randomized block design. Yield data showed no significant differences between treatments for any of the vegetables. Also, the soil moisture data did not indicate water stress in the treatments. In March of 1994, tomato transplants were planted and the irrigation treatments were altered to 30 %, 40% and 50% depletion, in an attempt to get significant differences between treatments. The results for all four vegetables showed high variability in soil water data between replications, although an initial determination of basal crop coefficients was possible. Additional data will be required to better refine the crop coefficients.
    • Subsurface Drip Irrigation of Leaf Lettuce and Broccoli II: Water Balance

      Thompson, Thomas L.; Maki, Kerri L.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      The objective of this research was to estimate a season -long water balance under one subsurface trickle- irrigated plot each of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. Waldmann's Green) and broccoli (Brassica olearacea L. var. Claudia). One lettuce plot during 1992-93 and one broccoli plot during 1993-94 were intensively instrumented with automated tensiometers. Tensiometer readings and estimates of evapotranspiration were used to estimate seasonal water contents in the crop root zone, and water losses due to leaching. For the monitored portion of the 1992-3 growing season, 19.1 an of irrigation water was applied, 12.5 cm of rainfall fell, and ET, was 11.5 cm. Estimated deep percolation was 60% of total water applied (irrigation plus rainfall). Leaching was periodic, and was mostly associated with rainfall events. During the monitored portion of the 19934 season, 21.2 cm of irrigation water were applied, 8.0 an of rainfall fell, and ET, was 21.9 cm. Estimated deep percolation was 28% of total water applied. Almost all of this leaching was associated with one major rainfall event. Water stored in the root zone (top 50 cm) was relatively constant at 12-14 cm water/50 cm soil except after rainfall.
    • Postemergence Weed Control in Onions

      Umeda, K.; Fredman, C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Oxyfluorfen (Goal®) herbicide at 0.125 to 0.25 lb. a.i./A applied postemergence (POST) to onions at the 3-leaf stage of growth effectively controlled London rocket, yellow sweetclover, and prostrate pigweed with marginal injury to onions. Earlier POST applications on 1- and 2-leaf onions caused injury and some stand reduction. Bromoxynil (Buctril®) herbicide at 0.25 lb. a.i./A applied early POST gave generally good weed control but did not adequately control sweetclover. Buctril® applied in clear weather did not injure 1-leaf onions but caused severe injury on 2- and 3-leaf onions when applied during cloudy weather conditions. Buctril® plus pendimethalin (Prowl®) tank-mix combination applied POST provided good control of London rocket, sweetclover, and prostrate pigweed; however, onion injury was severe due to applying Buctril® in cloudy weather. Buctril® and Goal® effectively controlled weeds present in the onions but timing of POST applications was critical with respect to onion size and weather conditions to minimize injury.
    • Early Postemergence Herbicide Weed Control in Onions

      Umeda, K.; Fredman, C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Oxyfluorfen (Goal®) herbicide at 0.25 lb. ai./A and bromoxynil (Buctril®) at 0.38 lb.a.i. /A applied early postemergence (POST) to onions at the 1- to 2-leaf stage of growth gave near complete control ( >98 %) of lambsquarters, knotweed, cheeseweed, London rocket, and good control ( -90 %) of shepherd's purse. Buctril® did not control annual bluegrass and Goal® only slightly reduced some of the heavy population. Both herbicides caused marginally unacceptable onion injury at 17-20 %. Buctril® plus pendimethalin (Prowl®) tank-mix combination applied POST also gave very good broadleaaved weed control but annual bluegrass was reduced only 50 %. Similar onion injury was observed for the combination treatment as Buctril® alone. Buctril® caused onion injury when it was applied during cloudy weather. Buctril® and Goal® were effective for broadspectrum broadleaved weed control but onions were sensitive when treated before reaching the full 2-leaf stage of growth. Cloudy weather during applications also intensified the onion injury by Buctril® treatments.
    • Subsurface Drip Irrigation of Leaf Lettuce and Broccoli I: Spatiel Distribution of Roots and Soil Water Tension

      Thompson, Thomas L.; Maki, Kerri L.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      The objectives of this research were i) to observe the movement of the wetting front in subsurface drip irrigated lettuce and broccoli, 2) to analyze variability in soil water tension (SWT) within the profile, and 3) to determine root distributions of subsurface drip irrigated lettuce and broccoli. Lettuce and broccoli plots at the Maricopa Agricultural Center during the 1992-93 and 1993-94 winter growing seasons were intensively instrumented with automated tensiometers. During both seasons, there was good agreement between mean daily SWT, and SWT measured before irrigation. During 1992-93, the maximum variation in mean SWT among tensiometers was 2.5 kPa. Among tensiometers within the zone of greatest root density, the maximum variation was only 1.5 kPa. Therefore, the range of SWT within the lettuce root zone was small, and tensiometer placement anywhere within the root zone would have been adequate. During 1993-94, the maximum variation in mean SWT among tensiometers was 7 kPa. The maximum variation among tensiometers within the zone of greatest root density was 5.3 kPa. The larger variation in mean SWT among tensiometers, compared to lettuce, is due to the greater water use of broccoli. Tensiometer placement will be more critical for higher water use crops. During both seasons roots proliferated around the drip tubing. These results substantiate the assumption that tensiometer placement anywhere within the zone of greatest root density will be adequate for irrigation scheduling of subsurface drip irrigated crops.
    • Efficacy of Insecticides to Green Peach Aphid on Iceberg Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Palumbo, John C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Three tests were conducted evaluating foliar and soil applied aphicides for efficacy to green peach aphid infesting iceberg lettuce. Aphid population densites were low in all three studies and differences among treatments were difficult to discern. At low aphid populations we could not detect whether or not soil applications of Admire enhanced or inhibited the activity of subsequent foliar applications of other aphicides. Although when used alone, some products did offer statistically significant aphid control. However, in a commercial setting these differences would probably not be significant. At low aphid populations none of the pyrethroid tank mixes evaluated gave significantly better aphid control than the products used alone. All of the experimental aphicides evaluated appeared to have some degree of efficacy to green peach aphid.
    • Dacthal® Herbicide Rate Comparison for Preemergence Weed Control in Onions

      Umeda, K.; Fredman, C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      DCPA (Dacthal®) herbicide was applied preemergence (PE) to the soil surface after onion planting and no crop injury was observed for rates of 5.3, 7.5, and 10.5 lb. a.i. /A at one of two locations. Dacthal® gave good control of London rocket and cheeseweed (90 -94 %) at one location and marginal control at the second location (79 -85 %). Dacthal® did not exhibit a rate response to control the two weeds common to both locations. The lower rate of Dacthal® did not differ in efficacy compared to higher rates to completely control lambsquarters and nettleleaf goosefoot. All rates of Dacthal® marginally controlled yellow sweetclover and other mustard weeds present. Dacthal® provided adequate weed control to allow onion stand establishment.
    • Mixed Lettuce and Romaine Variety Trials 1994/1995

      Wilcox, Mark; Oebker, Norman F.; Yuma Valley Agricultural Center (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
    • Use of Non Toxic Materials for Whitefly Control and Growth Enhancement in Crisphead Lettuce

      Molin, W. T.; Oebker, N. F.; Brown, J. K.; Palumbo, J. C.; Oebker, Norman F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1995-08)
      Field studies were conducted in Yuma and Tucson in 1993 to determine the effect of several non toxic substances purported to enhance growth and yield of lettuce, and to determine whether these treatments have an effect on whitefly populations. Five applications of the treatments were made beginning four weeks after planting and continuing at weekly intervals. Results indicated that there may be some positive effects of foliar applied methanol and nutrient (nitrogen/iron) treatments, as well as, from the use of Capture insecticide.