• Effect of Foliar Application of Benomyl on Severity of Septoria Leaf Spot on Pistachio in Southeastern Arizona

      Matheron, Michael E.; Kilby, Michael W.; Call, Robert; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      The fungicide, benomyl (Benlate) was foliar applied by a commercial air blast sprayer at the rate of 1.0 lb. a.i. per acre in early to late August. Treatments varied with a number of applications i.e. one or two and were compared to an untreated control. Benomyl significantly reduced leaf necrosis surrounding nut clusters and the number of leaf spot lesions when compared to control. One or two applications were equally effective in controlling Septoria leaf spot.
    • Foliar Applications of Boron to Pecan Trees Does Not Affect Fruit Set

      Kilby, Michael W.; Call, Robert; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Boron was applied as a foliar spray to pecan trees in a pecan orchard located in Cochise County. Single or repeated application prior to pollination did not affect nutlet set. Leaf analysis indicated that the boron levels in all trees were in the sufficient range for optimum growth and production.
    • Nutritional Status of Wine Grap Cultivars Grown in Southern Arizona

      Kilby, Michael W.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Ten winegrape vineyards consisting of different cultivars were leaf petiole sampled at bloomtime. Petioles were analyzed and results composited for the survey. There were indications that boron, iron, nitrogen and phosphorus were nutrients where potential problems (deficiencies) were likely to occur. This survey supplied information for the basis of developing a monitoring program on an annual basis.
    • Pruning Methods Affect Yield and Fruit Quality of 'Merlot' and 'Sauvignon Blanc' Grapevines

      Kilby, Michael W.; Wright, Glenn; Kilby, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      One red and one white cultivar of winegrapes grown in Southern Arizona was pruned to four different methods. The red cultivar was 'Merlot' and the white was 'Sauvignon Blanc'. The pruning methods were 2 bud spur, 4 bud spur, cane and basal buds only. The basal bud treatment was eliminated for 'Sauvignon Blanc'. The 4 bud spur method resulted in significantly greater yield when compared to the other methods. Fruit produced from the basal bud only treatment resulted in fruit that was significantly greater in pH and acid content. The 'Sauvignon Blanc' cultivar had significantly higher yield with cane pruning with no difference in fruit quality.