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dc.contributor.authorMatheron, Michael E.
dc.contributor.authorTickes, Barry R.
dc.contributor.authorPorchas, Martin
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Charles A.
dc.contributor.authorDidier, Louis G.
dc.contributor.authorFord, Kevin P.
dc.contributor.editorByrne, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.editorBaciewicz, Pattien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-08T19:14:46Z
dc.date.available2012-03-08T19:14:46Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/214947
dc.description.abstractIn the 2001-2002 production season, Fusarium wilt was observed for the first time in six different lettuce fields in the Gila and Dome Valley production areas of Yuma County, Arizona. The disease was found in 11 additional sites during 2002-2003. Fusarium wilt presents a serious threat to the health of the lettuce industry in Arizona. The only effective means of controlling Fusarium wilt of lettuce at this time is to avoid infested fields. On the other hand, Fusarium wilt in other crops, such as tomatoes and melons, is controlled effectively by planting cultivars resistant to the pathogen. The relative resistance of lettuce cultivars grown in the Arizona desert production region is unknown; therefore, a cultivar evaluation trial was established in a field known to contain the wilt pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lactucae. Tested cultivars were grouped into three different planting dates: Sep 7, Oct 17 and Dec 6, 2002. A majority of the cultivars within each planting date were those that would be planted in the desert at that time. Fusarium wilt was severe in the early planting of lettuce (Sep 7), moderate in the second planting (Oct 17) and very mild in the third planting (Dec 6). Disease severity was low in some lettuce cultivars in the second planting and most cultivars in the third planting. Among the types of lettuce tested, head lettuce was usually least resistant whereas romaine was most resistant. The data presented in this report are preliminary findings, subject to confirmation in another study planned for the next lettuce production season.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1323en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-136en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Plant pathogensen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of Lettuce Cultivars for Resistance to Fusarium Wilt in 2003en_US
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalVegetable Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T19:57:24Z
html.description.abstractIn the 2001-2002 production season, Fusarium wilt was observed for the first time in six different lettuce fields in the Gila and Dome Valley production areas of Yuma County, Arizona. The disease was found in 11 additional sites during 2002-2003. Fusarium wilt presents a serious threat to the health of the lettuce industry in Arizona. The only effective means of controlling Fusarium wilt of lettuce at this time is to avoid infested fields. On the other hand, Fusarium wilt in other crops, such as tomatoes and melons, is controlled effectively by planting cultivars resistant to the pathogen. The relative resistance of lettuce cultivars grown in the Arizona desert production region is unknown; therefore, a cultivar evaluation trial was established in a field known to contain the wilt pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lactucae. Tested cultivars were grouped into three different planting dates: Sep 7, Oct 17 and Dec 6, 2002. A majority of the cultivars within each planting date were those that would be planted in the desert at that time. Fusarium wilt was severe in the early planting of lettuce (Sep 7), moderate in the second planting (Oct 17) and very mild in the third planting (Dec 6). Disease severity was low in some lettuce cultivars in the second planting and most cultivars in the third planting. Among the types of lettuce tested, head lettuce was usually least resistant whereas romaine was most resistant. The data presented in this report are preliminary findings, subject to confirmation in another study planned for the next lettuce production season.


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