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dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, John C.
dc.contributor.editorByrne, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.editorBaciewicz, Pattien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-08T19:12:48Z
dc.date.available2012-03-08T19:12:48Z
dc.date.issued2003-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/214967
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies were conducted during the past two growing season to examine the population growth, distribution and damage potential of the foxglove aphid on head lettuce in the Yuma Valley. Light populations of foxglove aphids were first found colonizing untreated head lettuce in small experimental plots at the Yuma Agricultural Center in the spring of 2001. In the spring of 2002 foxglove aphids reached high population levels at YAC on spring plantings, but were not reported in commercial fields. This past spring foxglove aphid populations were wide-spread throughout the Yuma Valley, particularly in fields near the Colorado river, adjacent to citrus orchards and residential areas, and not treated with Admire. Experimental studies suggested that foxglove aphids can reach economic levels on desert head lettuce, particularly crops planted during late November and December.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1323en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-136en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Insectsen_US
dc.titleThe Emergence of the Foxglove Aphid, Aulacorthum solani, as an Economic Pest of Lettuce in the Desert Southwesten_US
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalVegetable Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T06:37:07Z
html.description.abstractSeveral studies were conducted during the past two growing season to examine the population growth, distribution and damage potential of the foxglove aphid on head lettuce in the Yuma Valley. Light populations of foxglove aphids were first found colonizing untreated head lettuce in small experimental plots at the Yuma Agricultural Center in the spring of 2001. In the spring of 2002 foxglove aphids reached high population levels at YAC on spring plantings, but were not reported in commercial fields. This past spring foxglove aphid populations were wide-spread throughout the Yuma Valley, particularly in fields near the Colorado river, adjacent to citrus orchards and residential areas, and not treated with Admire. Experimental studies suggested that foxglove aphids can reach economic levels on desert head lettuce, particularly crops planted during late November and December.


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