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dc.contributor.authorMatheron, Michael E.
dc.contributor.authorPorchas, Martin
dc.contributor.editorByrne, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.editorBaciewicz, Pattien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-08T19:51:13Z
dc.date.available2012-03-08T19:51:13Z
dc.date.issued2005-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/215017
dc.description.abstractPhytophthora blight of peppers (Capsicum annuum) is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. In Arizona, the root and crown rot phase of the disease initially can appear on plants early in the growing season in areas of the field where soil remains saturated with water after an irrigation. Disease severity can increase dramatically due to summer rains during July and August in the southeastern Arizona production area. The efficacy of the systemic fungicide mefenoxem (Ridomil Gold)) for control of Phytophthora blight on pepper has been documented; however, in many pepper production regions, populations of the pathogen insensitive to this fungicide have developed. Other chemistries, including dimethomorph (Acrobat) as well as two new fungicides in development (Ranman and TM-459) have activity on some species of Phytophthora and associated diseases on crops other than pepper. The objective of the following trials was to evaluate and compare the effects of soil drench treatments with Ridomil, Acrobat, Ranman and TM-459 alone, as well as in combination treatments on subsequent development of root and crown rot on chile pepper plants grown in soil naturally infested with P. capsici. Three separate trials were conducted in the greenhouse. Usually, the top fresh weight of plants treated with an appropriate amount of Ranman, TM-459, or Acrobat did not differ from plants grown in sterilized soil. On the other hand, the top fresh weight of plants treated with Ridomil Gold often was not significantly different from plants grown in untreated infested soil, implying that this soil contained a population of Phytophthora capsici that is insensitive to this fungicide. These trials suggest that soil application of Ranman and TM-459 could effectively inhibit the development of Phytophthora root and crown rot on chile peppers grown in soil infested with Phytophthora capsici.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-144en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1382en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Plant pathologyen_US
dc.titleEffect of Fungicides on Development of Root and Crown Rot on Chile Pepper Plants Grown in Field Soil Naturally Infested with Phytophthora capsicien_US
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalVegetable Reporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T06:38:12Z
html.description.abstractPhytophthora blight of peppers (Capsicum annuum) is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. In Arizona, the root and crown rot phase of the disease initially can appear on plants early in the growing season in areas of the field where soil remains saturated with water after an irrigation. Disease severity can increase dramatically due to summer rains during July and August in the southeastern Arizona production area. The efficacy of the systemic fungicide mefenoxem (Ridomil Gold)) for control of Phytophthora blight on pepper has been documented; however, in many pepper production regions, populations of the pathogen insensitive to this fungicide have developed. Other chemistries, including dimethomorph (Acrobat) as well as two new fungicides in development (Ranman and TM-459) have activity on some species of Phytophthora and associated diseases on crops other than pepper. The objective of the following trials was to evaluate and compare the effects of soil drench treatments with Ridomil, Acrobat, Ranman and TM-459 alone, as well as in combination treatments on subsequent development of root and crown rot on chile pepper plants grown in soil naturally infested with P. capsici. Three separate trials were conducted in the greenhouse. Usually, the top fresh weight of plants treated with an appropriate amount of Ranman, TM-459, or Acrobat did not differ from plants grown in sterilized soil. On the other hand, the top fresh weight of plants treated with Ridomil Gold often was not significantly different from plants grown in untreated infested soil, implying that this soil contained a population of Phytophthora capsici that is insensitive to this fungicide. These trials suggest that soil application of Ranman and TM-459 could effectively inhibit the development of Phytophthora root and crown rot on chile peppers grown in soil infested with Phytophthora capsici.


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