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dc.contributor.authorKopec, David M.
dc.contributor.editorKopec, David M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-22T19:49:41Z
dc.date.available2012-03-22T19:49:41Z
dc.date.issued2001-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216390
dc.description.abstractA test was devised to investigate a forced spring transition from perennial ryegrass, back to Tifway (419) bermudagrass with scalping as the main treatment. Scalping of the turf was combined with various nitrogen and aerification treatments performed initially on May 22, 1997. Turfgrass aeration, either with or without extra nitrogen applications, when combined with an initial scalping operation, did not enhance bermudagrass transition by twenty-eight days after treatment (DAT), at the end of June 1997. Turfgrass color, quality and density were adversely affected from initial aerification treatments, especially when combined with initial scalping, The turf recovered best from multiple applications of nitrogen (applied at scalping and again at 7DAT). Turfgrass density (visual estimates) showed that in conjunction with scalping, two applications of nitrogen, totaling 1.5 lbs./month, without aerification, provided a dense turf at 16DAT, which was second only to the untreated control plot. At 27 DAT, scalping + N + N + aerification treated plots had the highest estimate of visual density, eventually showing a benefit from aerification. Scalped and aerified turf alone (no nitrogen) had unacceptable turf density at 16DAT and 27DAT. Generally, two 0.75 lb./N/m applications with aerification proved beneficial over the single application of nitrogen plus aerification, when both turfs were initially scalped. Although non-significant statistically, the additional treatment of nitrogen provided 10% more bermudagrass cover than the single application of nitrogen, for turfs both overseeded and scalped. Scalping alone, plus a single application of N, produced 33% less bermudagrass by June 30, then that of the untreated control.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-126en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1246en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.titleForced Transition of Tifway 419 using Select Cultural Management Practicesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T08:29:47Z
html.description.abstractA test was devised to investigate a forced spring transition from perennial ryegrass, back to Tifway (419) bermudagrass with scalping as the main treatment. Scalping of the turf was combined with various nitrogen and aerification treatments performed initially on May 22, 1997. Turfgrass aeration, either with or without extra nitrogen applications, when combined with an initial scalping operation, did not enhance bermudagrass transition by twenty-eight days after treatment (DAT), at the end of June 1997. Turfgrass color, quality and density were adversely affected from initial aerification treatments, especially when combined with initial scalping, The turf recovered best from multiple applications of nitrogen (applied at scalping and again at 7DAT). Turfgrass density (visual estimates) showed that in conjunction with scalping, two applications of nitrogen, totaling 1.5 lbs./month, without aerification, provided a dense turf at 16DAT, which was second only to the untreated control plot. At 27 DAT, scalping + N + N + aerification treated plots had the highest estimate of visual density, eventually showing a benefit from aerification. Scalped and aerified turf alone (no nitrogen) had unacceptable turf density at 16DAT and 27DAT. Generally, two 0.75 lb./N/m applications with aerification proved beneficial over the single application of nitrogen plus aerification, when both turfs were initially scalped. Although non-significant statistically, the additional treatment of nitrogen provided 10% more bermudagrass cover than the single application of nitrogen, for turfs both overseeded and scalped. Scalping alone, plus a single application of N, produced 33% less bermudagrass by June 30, then that of the untreated control.


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