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dc.contributor.authorAmado, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-16T20:56:44Z
dc.date.available2012-04-16T20:56:44Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/218655
dc.description.abstractHispanic ownership of businesses has existed in Tucson prior to the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, which allowed the United States to acquire Tucson and part of Southern Arizona. Although ranching and agriculture were main sources of income for this group of pioneer settlers, they were able to diversify their wealth into other sectors of the economy. As the Hispanic population became integrated into American society, an evolution of minority identity towards business ownership occurred. Starting in the twentieth century, Mexican Americans tended to operate mostly in the service industry, such as barber shops and grocery stores. There were a few Hispanic lawyers and doctors. However, their numbers were small in compañson to the growing Mexican American and Anglo populations. The Great Depression of the 1930s affected many of these agriculturally oriented Hispanic families. By the 1940s, more Mexican Americans and Anglos were arriving to the area in search of employment. By the 1980s, a trend was evident of a service sector economy for the Tucson labor market. Most of the twenty Hispanic entrepreneurs interviewed for this study were first or second generation Tucsonans, The pioneer Hispanic families are no longer at the forefront of business opportunities. Instead, sonic of the offspring from these pioneer families have gone into other fields or enterprises in order to develop their own entrepreneurial identity. Some of the interviewees that are descendants of these "latecomers" are undecided as to whether they want their children to enter the family business. As a consequence, some of these establishments may end in the next twenty to thirty years. A cycle of continual Hispanic "latecomers" operating businesses may develop in the Tucson area. The consequence could be the lack of a solid economic base for the Hispanic business community.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizona, Office of Research, Undergraduate Research Award.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 14en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.subjectHispanic American business enterprises -- Arizona -- Tucsonen_US
dc.subjectHispanic American businesspeople -- Arizona -- Tucsonen_US
dc.subjectSmall business -- Arizona -- Tucsonen_US
dc.titleHispanic Businesses in Tucson Since 1854en_US
dc.typetext
dc.typeBook
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc656995860
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T18:48:03Z
html.description.abstractHispanic ownership of businesses has existed in Tucson prior to the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, which allowed the United States to acquire Tucson and part of Southern Arizona. Although ranching and agriculture were main sources of income for this group of pioneer settlers, they were able to diversify their wealth into other sectors of the economy. As the Hispanic population became integrated into American society, an evolution of minority identity towards business ownership occurred. Starting in the twentieth century, Mexican Americans tended to operate mostly in the service industry, such as barber shops and grocery stores. There were a few Hispanic lawyers and doctors. However, their numbers were small in compañson to the growing Mexican American and Anglo populations. The Great Depression of the 1930s affected many of these agriculturally oriented Hispanic families. By the 1940s, more Mexican Americans and Anglos were arriving to the area in search of employment. By the 1980s, a trend was evident of a service sector economy for the Tucson labor market. Most of the twenty Hispanic entrepreneurs interviewed for this study were first or second generation Tucsonans, The pioneer Hispanic families are no longer at the forefront of business opportunities. Instead, sonic of the offspring from these pioneer families have gone into other fields or enterprises in order to develop their own entrepreneurial identity. Some of the interviewees that are descendants of these "latecomers" are undecided as to whether they want their children to enter the family business. As a consequence, some of these establishments may end in the next twenty to thirty years. A cycle of continual Hispanic "latecomers" operating businesses may develop in the Tucson area. The consequence could be the lack of a solid economic base for the Hispanic business community.


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