Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChan, Nam
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-30T20:05:17Z
dc.date.available2012-04-30T20:05:17Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/221272
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractAsian Americans are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the United States, with more than 60% of its members being foreign born, and 30% of limited English proficiency. Often perceived as the healthy and wealthy “Model Minority,” Asian Americans in fact suffer disproportionately in a number of areas of health, such as liver cancer and diabetes. There is a paucity of evidence-based interventions specifically adapted for and tested among Asian American to address these health disparities. We therefore aimed to investigate the preferred learning modalities in this population. We utilized a brief questionnaire to investigate how Asian Americans residing in Maricopa County prefer to learn and build skills related to health improvement. The results suggest that there is no dominant preference for learning modalities among Asian Americans; therefore, modalities in both individual and group learning should be offered. The only group that shows a statistically significant preference for individual learning is the respondents with postsecondary education. Consequently, in addition to group interventions such as the Diabetes Prevention Program, researchers should consider developing self-guided training on-line and through printed materials. This initial 4 research will help guide future efforts to educate the Asian American populations on diabetes prevention and other health conditions.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshPatient educationen
dc.titlePreference of Health-related Learning Modalities Among Asian Americans in Maricopa Countyen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorHirano, Dougen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-20T10:23:42Z
html.description.abstractAsian Americans are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the United States, with more than 60% of its members being foreign born, and 30% of limited English proficiency. Often perceived as the healthy and wealthy “Model Minority,” Asian Americans in fact suffer disproportionately in a number of areas of health, such as liver cancer and diabetes. There is a paucity of evidence-based interventions specifically adapted for and tested among Asian American to address these health disparities. We therefore aimed to investigate the preferred learning modalities in this population. We utilized a brief questionnaire to investigate how Asian Americans residing in Maricopa County prefer to learn and build skills related to health improvement. The results suggest that there is no dominant preference for learning modalities among Asian Americans; therefore, modalities in both individual and group learning should be offered. The only group that shows a statistically significant preference for individual learning is the respondents with postsecondary education. Consequently, in addition to group interventions such as the Diabetes Prevention Program, researchers should consider developing self-guided training on-line and through printed materials. This initial 4 research will help guide future efforts to educate the Asian American populations on diabetes prevention and other health conditions.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Chan_Nam_Thesis.pdf
Size:
307.9Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Thesis
Thumbnail
Name:
Chan_Nam_Poster.pdf
Size:
128.6Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Poster

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record