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dc.contributor.authorOrtiz, Zachary
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-01T14:52:27Z
dc.date.available2012-05-01T14:52:27Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/221383
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractPrior research shows racial disparities in patient (IP) and emergency department (ED) use for children with asthma. It has been difficult to disentangle the effects of race/ethnicity from the effect of socioeconomic status on IP and ED use. To better understand the relationship between race/ethnicity and care in these settings, data from a cohort of 3490 school-age children with asthma enrolled in the AHCCCS (Medicaid) program in Maricopa County, Arizona in 2008 were analyzed. For children with asthma, odds ratios were estimated by comparing ‘any visit’ (ED or IP) to ‘no visits’ according to race/ethnicity. Among children with asthma, junior high and high school individuals were more likely to experience a visit compared to elementary school age individuals. African-Americans were about twice as likely to have at least one ED or IP visit compared with White, non-Hispanics. Odds ratios for having any ED or IP visit were also increased in Hispanics and Native-Americans compared with White, non-Hispanics but the increases were not statistically significant. Although the generalizability of the study is limited, the data suggest that differences in socioeconomic status do not fully explain racial disparities in use of the ED and IP settings for asthma care. Attempts 5 to further understand any causal relationship between race/ethnicity and asthma should be coupled with targeted interventions to minimize known disparities.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAHCCCSen
dc.subject.meshMedicaiden
dc.subject.meshArizonaen
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen
dc.titleThe Role of Access: Acute Asthma Care Utilization in a 2008 Arizona Medicaid Populationen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorPetitti, Dianaen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T00:28:25Z
html.description.abstractPrior research shows racial disparities in patient (IP) and emergency department (ED) use for children with asthma. It has been difficult to disentangle the effects of race/ethnicity from the effect of socioeconomic status on IP and ED use. To better understand the relationship between race/ethnicity and care in these settings, data from a cohort of 3490 school-age children with asthma enrolled in the AHCCCS (Medicaid) program in Maricopa County, Arizona in 2008 were analyzed. For children with asthma, odds ratios were estimated by comparing ‘any visit’ (ED or IP) to ‘no visits’ according to race/ethnicity. Among children with asthma, junior high and high school individuals were more likely to experience a visit compared to elementary school age individuals. African-Americans were about twice as likely to have at least one ED or IP visit compared with White, non-Hispanics. Odds ratios for having any ED or IP visit were also increased in Hispanics and Native-Americans compared with White, non-Hispanics but the increases were not statistically significant. Although the generalizability of the study is limited, the data suggest that differences in socioeconomic status do not fully explain racial disparities in use of the ED and IP settings for asthma care. Attempts 5 to further understand any causal relationship between race/ethnicity and asthma should be coupled with targeted interventions to minimize known disparities.


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