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dc.contributor.advisorDeymier, Pierre A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSwinteck, Nichlas Z.*
dc.creatorSwinteck, Nichlas Z.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-08T20:30:22Z
dc.date.available2012-06-08T20:30:22Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228156
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation contains research directed at investigating the behavior and properties of a class of composite materials known as phononic crystals. Two categories of phononic crystals are explicitly investigated: (I) elastic phononic crystals and (II) nano-scale phononic crystals. For elastic phononic crystals, attention is directed at two-dimensional structures. Two specific structures are evaluated (1) a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a square array of cylindrical Polyvinylchloride inclusions in air and (2) a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a square array of steel cylindrical inclusions in epoxy. For the first configuration, a theoretical model is developed to ascertain the necessary band structure and equi-frequency contour features for the realization of phase control between propagating acoustic waves. In contrasting this phononic crystal with a reference system, it is shown that phononic crystals with equifrequency contours showing non-collinear wave and group velocity vectors are ideal systems for controlling the phase between propagating acoustic waves. For the second configuration, it is demonstrated that multiple functions can be realized of a solid/solid phononic crystal. The epoxy/steel phononic crystal is shown to behave as (1) an acoustic wave collimator, (2) a defect-less wave guide, (3) a directional source for elastic waves, (4) an acoustic beam splitter, (5) a phase-control device and (6) a k-space multiplexer. To transition between macro-scale systems (elastic phononic crystals) and nano-scale systems (nano-phononic crystals), a toy model of a one-dimensional chain of masses connected with non-linear, anharmonic springs is utilized. The implementation of this model introduces critical ideas unique to nano-scale systems, particularly the concept of phonon mode lifetime. The nano-scale phononic crystal of interest is a graphene sheet with periodically spaced holes in a triangular array. It is found through equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation techniques, that phonon-boundary collision effects and coherent phononic effects (band-folding) are two competing scattering mechanisms responsible for the reduction of acoustic and optical phonon lifetimes. Conclusions drawn about the lifetime of thermal phonons in phononic crystal patterned graphene are linked with the anharmonic, one-dimensional crystal model.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectElastic Waveen_US
dc.subjectPhonon Decayen_US
dc.subjectPhononic Crystalen_US
dc.subjectPhonon Lifetimeen_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic Waveen_US
dc.subjectAnharmonicen_US
dc.titlePhase-Space Properties of Two-Dimensional Elastic Phononic Crystals and Anharmonic Effects in Nano-Phononic Crystalsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuralidharan, Krishnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZiolkowski, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeymier, Pierre A.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-28T08:05:43Z
html.description.abstractThis dissertation contains research directed at investigating the behavior and properties of a class of composite materials known as phononic crystals. Two categories of phononic crystals are explicitly investigated: (I) elastic phononic crystals and (II) nano-scale phononic crystals. For elastic phononic crystals, attention is directed at two-dimensional structures. Two specific structures are evaluated (1) a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a square array of cylindrical Polyvinylchloride inclusions in air and (2) a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a square array of steel cylindrical inclusions in epoxy. For the first configuration, a theoretical model is developed to ascertain the necessary band structure and equi-frequency contour features for the realization of phase control between propagating acoustic waves. In contrasting this phononic crystal with a reference system, it is shown that phononic crystals with equifrequency contours showing non-collinear wave and group velocity vectors are ideal systems for controlling the phase between propagating acoustic waves. For the second configuration, it is demonstrated that multiple functions can be realized of a solid/solid phononic crystal. The epoxy/steel phononic crystal is shown to behave as (1) an acoustic wave collimator, (2) a defect-less wave guide, (3) a directional source for elastic waves, (4) an acoustic beam splitter, (5) a phase-control device and (6) a k-space multiplexer. To transition between macro-scale systems (elastic phononic crystals) and nano-scale systems (nano-phononic crystals), a toy model of a one-dimensional chain of masses connected with non-linear, anharmonic springs is utilized. The implementation of this model introduces critical ideas unique to nano-scale systems, particularly the concept of phonon mode lifetime. The nano-scale phononic crystal of interest is a graphene sheet with periodically spaced holes in a triangular array. It is found through equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation techniques, that phonon-boundary collision effects and coherent phononic effects (band-folding) are two competing scattering mechanisms responsible for the reduction of acoustic and optical phonon lifetimes. Conclusions drawn about the lifetime of thermal phonons in phononic crystal patterned graphene are linked with the anharmonic, one-dimensional crystal model.


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