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dc.contributor.advisorJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdmund, Sara J.
dc.creatorEdmund, Sara J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T19:45:55Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T19:45:55Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228437
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing an existing web based weight loss program and the effectiveness of the program in increasing self efficacy and motivation for weight loss among obese women with PCOS. There is consensus among many infertility experts that weight loss should be the first line of therapy for infertility and PCOS among obese women desiring pregnancy. Web based interventions have been effective in other areas of health behavior change. However, there have been no studies to evaluate use of a web-based weight loss program with the targeted population. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory provides the basis for the contention that self efficacy is a major factor in self regulation. Another factor is motivation, which enhances self efficacy, thus creating behavior change. A sample of nine women participated in the one group pretest/posttest study measuring self efficacy, motivation and web site visits. BMI was calculated based on self-reported height and weight at baseline and after four weeks as a secondary outcome. There were significant increases in both self-efficacy and motivation for weight loss. Feasibility measures were not met at 90%. Eight of nine participants decreased their BMI. These results support utilization of currently available, free, online weight loss programs for this population.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.titleMotivating Weight Loss Among Obese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndromeen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBerg, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShea, Kimberly D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-18T00:48:38Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing an existing web based weight loss program and the effectiveness of the program in increasing self efficacy and motivation for weight loss among obese women with PCOS. There is consensus among many infertility experts that weight loss should be the first line of therapy for infertility and PCOS among obese women desiring pregnancy. Web based interventions have been effective in other areas of health behavior change. However, there have been no studies to evaluate use of a web-based weight loss program with the targeted population. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory provides the basis for the contention that self efficacy is a major factor in self regulation. Another factor is motivation, which enhances self efficacy, thus creating behavior change. A sample of nine women participated in the one group pretest/posttest study measuring self efficacy, motivation and web site visits. BMI was calculated based on self-reported height and weight at baseline and after four weeks as a secondary outcome. There were significant increases in both self-efficacy and motivation for weight loss. Feasibility measures were not met at 90%. Eight of nine participants decreased their BMI. These results support utilization of currently available, free, online weight loss programs for this population.


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