Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Hongmeien_US
dc.creatorWu, Hongmeien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T18:22:54Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T18:22:54Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228453
dc.description.abstractSince it was introduced in Forster and Davis (1984), masked priming has been widely adopted in the psycholinguistic research on visual word recognition, but there has been little consensus on its actual mechanisms, i.e. how it occurs and how it should be interpreted. This dissertation addresses two different interpretations of masked priming, one based on the Interactive Activation Model (McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981), in which priming is seen as a result of persisting activation from the prime, the other based on the Entry Opening Model (Forster & Davis, 1984), which sees priming as a savings effect. Five experiments are reported testing contrasting hypotheses about the role of prime duration and prime-target asynchrony (SOA) in masked priming using both identity and form priming. Overall, this dissertation lends support to the Entry Opening Model, demonstrating that masked priming is essentially a savings effect, and that as such, it is determined by the SOA, not the prime duration per se.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectmechanismsen_US
dc.subjectvisual word recognitionen_US
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
dc.subjectlexical processingen_US
dc.subjectmasked primingen_US
dc.titleMechanisms of Masked Priming: Testing the Entry Opening Modelen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNicol, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberForster, Kenneth I.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition & Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T13:18:40Z
html.description.abstractSince it was introduced in Forster and Davis (1984), masked priming has been widely adopted in the psycholinguistic research on visual word recognition, but there has been little consensus on its actual mechanisms, i.e. how it occurs and how it should be interpreted. This dissertation addresses two different interpretations of masked priming, one based on the Interactive Activation Model (McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981), in which priming is seen as a result of persisting activation from the prime, the other based on the Entry Opening Model (Forster & Davis, 1984), which sees priming as a savings effect. Five experiments are reported testing contrasting hypotheses about the role of prime duration and prime-target asynchrony (SOA) in masked priming using both identity and form priming. Overall, this dissertation lends support to the Entry Opening Model, demonstrating that masked priming is essentially a savings effect, and that as such, it is determined by the SOA, not the prime duration per se.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_12157_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
325.8Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record