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dc.contributor.advisorCornell, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHale, Michelle Lynn*
dc.creatorHale, Michelle Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T18:48:59Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T18:48:59Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228455
dc.description.abstractThe Navajo Nation comprises 110 local communities spread over 16 million acres and linked under a highly centralized system of tribal government. Since the creation of the Navajo chapter system, which facilitates local governance for the Navajo Nation, there have been growing tensions between some of these local communities and the central government in Window Rock. In the 1990s and early 2000s, several of these communities moved to claim greater decision-making authority as an assertion of local empowerment. This dissertation examines three such communities and their empowerment strategies: a grassroots secession movement at Tohajiilee, Shonto's use of the Navajo Nation's Local Governance Act (LGA), and the establishment of the Kayenta Township. This comparative study examines these strategies and considers their significance for the future of Navajo leadership and self-government.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectNavajoen_US
dc.subjectReservationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectChapteren_US
dc.subjectDineen_US
dc.titleDevolution and the Navajo Nation: Strategies for Local Empowerment in Three Navajo Communitiesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHiller, Joseph G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParezo, Nancy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCornell, Stephenen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T00:00:49Z
html.description.abstractThe Navajo Nation comprises 110 local communities spread over 16 million acres and linked under a highly centralized system of tribal government. Since the creation of the Navajo chapter system, which facilitates local governance for the Navajo Nation, there have been growing tensions between some of these local communities and the central government in Window Rock. In the 1990s and early 2000s, several of these communities moved to claim greater decision-making authority as an assertion of local empowerment. This dissertation examines three such communities and their empowerment strategies: a grassroots secession movement at Tohajiilee, Shonto's use of the Navajo Nation's Local Governance Act (LGA), and the establishment of the Kayenta Township. This comparative study examines these strategies and considers their significance for the future of Navajo leadership and self-government.


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